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Alison K. Frazier


Associate ProfessorPh.D., 1997, Columbia University

Alison K. Frazier

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-6375
  • Office: GAR 2,198
  • Office Hours: Spring 2016: M 2-3pm and Th 8-9am and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography


Research interests

Current research projects include editions of humanist saints' lives; a study of a quattrocento hexameral commentary; a census of Bonino Mombrizio's c. 1477 "Sanctuarium"

Courses taught

Medieval and Renaissance Continental Europe, especially intellectual history, religion, hagiography, biblical exegesis, manuscripts and printing

Courses


EUS 346 • Machiavelli-Honors

36245 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 0.132
(also listed as AHC 330, CTI 375, HIS 350L, LAH 350, R S 357)

This upper-division research seminar takes students through Niccolò Machiavelli’s chief writings. We consider the local, regional, Mediterranean, European, and global aspects of his work. Through class discussion and short written assignments (20%), students will identify a research topic in consultation with the professor.

There are no prerequisites but His 343g “Italian Renaissance” (offered Spr 2016) is strongly recommended.

Texts:

Readings will include:

Machiavelli: The Prince; The Discourses; The Art of War; Mandragola; Clizia; The Florentine Histories; selected letters and short writings (buy the required translations)

Black: Machiavelli (the best recent biography)

Najemy, ed.: Cambridge Companion to Machiavelli

Course packet of scholarly articles

Grading:

Each student will write a historiography essay (15%); draft a prospectus (20%); and complete a major research paper (30%). Students will give two oral presentations, one at the prospectus stage (5%), and one upon completion of the research paper (10%).

EUS 346 • Italian Renaissance, 1350-1550

35555 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ 1.120
(also listed as HIS 343G, R S 357, WGS 340)

Please check back for updates.

EUS S346 • Italian Renaissance, 1350-1550

84085 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am CLA 0.122
(also listed as HIS S343G, R S S357)

This upper-division course combines lecture, group work, and discussion to introduce the political, social, economic, and cultural phenomena that made the Italian peninsula such a lively place between 1350 and 1550. Drawing on a wide range of primary sources, we examine cultural production in many realms of human experience. Emphasis falls upon the “recovery of learning” and its effect on areas ranging from religion and gender, to economics, politics, technology, and art.

This course aims to teach the analysis of historical evidence. By semester’s end, you will have read some of the most influential and controversial works from this period. You will be able to put them in historical context, to describe how historians use them, and to explain why they remain compelling today.

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

Texts:

Boccaccio, Decameron

Alberti, On the Family

Machiavelli, Mandragola

Castiglione, The Courtier

Vasari, Lives of the Artists

Aretino, Master of the Horse

Grading:

Quizzes

Reading worksheets

Two essay exams

EUS F346 • Italian Renaissance, 1350-1550

84180 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am GAR 1.126
(also listed as HIS F343G, R S F357, WGS F340)

Description. This upper-division course combines lecture, group work, and discussion to introduce the political, social, economic, and cultural phenomena that made the Italian peninsula such a lively place between 1350 and 1550. Drawing on a wide range of primary sources, we examine cultural production in many realms of human experience. Emphasis falls upon the “recovery of learning” and its effect on areas ranging from religion and gender, to economics, politics, technology, and art.

 

This course aims to teach the analysis of historical evidence. By semester’s end, you will have read some of the most influential and controversial works from this period. You will be able to put them in historical context, to describe how historians use them, and to explain why they remain compelling today.

 

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

 

Readings may include:

Boccaccio, Decameron

            Alberti, On the Family

            Machiavelli, Mandragola

            Castiglione, The Courtier

            Vasari, Lives of the Artists

            Aretino, Master of the Horse

 

Assignments include:

            Quizzes

            Reading responses

            Two exams

 

 

EUS 346 • Creation

36494 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as HIS 350L, R S 373, WGS 345)

HIS 350L

This senior-level, writing-intensive seminar examines interpretations of Genesis 1-3 in the premodern world. By reading authors from Plato to Galileo, and by considering a variety of religious traditions, students investigate the rich variety of responses to the idea of Creation. In conversation, students explore together the implications of arguments about Creation for early developments in western theology, science, and philosophy. Reading worksheets and small group work help students learn to articulate their responses fully.

By the end of the semester, you will be able to describe how premodern efforts to understand Genesis 1-3 affected developments in science, philosophy, and theology. You will have written essays leading to a research paper that deepens your knowledge in a specialized area and develops your analytic skills.

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon readings and discussion.

A SEMINAR IS NOT A LECTURE COURSE. YOUR CAREFUL PREPARATION OF ALL ASSIGNMENTS IS REQUIRED FOR THE COURSE TO WORK.

Readings may include

Plato, Timaeus

Augustine, Genesis against the Manichees

Selections from al-Tabari

Selections from Maimonides

Selections from Thomas Aquinas

Selections from Luther’s Sermons

Galileo, Letter to Queen Christina

Assignments may include

Map quiz

Reading worksheets

Two essays of graduated length (3/5 pp)

Final research paper (8-10pp)

 

Publications


Books & Articles

  • "Liturgical Humanism: Saints' Offices from the Italian Peninsula." For A.M. Busse Berger and J. Rodin, eds., Cambridge Companion to Fifteenth-Century Music. New York: Cambridge University Press.  2015. 310-329.
  • Ed., The Saint Between Manuscript and Print (Italy 1400-1600). Toronto: Center for Renaissance and Reformation Studies. 2015. Introduction;translation of five of the twelve articles.
  • Co-ed. with Patrick Nold. Essays in Renaissance Thought and Letters. In Honor of John Monfasani. Leiden: Brill Press, 2015. Introduction; translation of three articles.
  • “Biography as an Genre of Moral Philosophy” in D.A. Lines and S. Ebbersmeyer, eds., Rethinking Virtue, Reforming Society: New Directions in Renaissance Ethics (Turnhout: Brepols, 2013), 215-49.
  • Sub-ed., Renaissance Studies in Honor of Joseph Connors, ed. M. Israels and L. Waldman. Florence: Villa I Tatti-Harvard University/ Olschki, 2013. In charge of sixteen articles.
  • “Who Wrote the First Life of Lorenzo de’ Medici?” in Renaissance Studies in Honor of Joseph Connors, ed. M. Israels and L. Waldman (Florence: Villa I Tatti, Harvard University / Olschki, 2013).58-63.
  • “Humanist Lives of St. Catherine of Siena” in J. Hamburger and G. Signori, eds.,  Catherine of Siena: The Creation of a Cult (Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts) (Turnhout: Brepols, 2013), 109-34.
  • “Les Augustins patrons d’un humaniste laïc? Le cas de Giovanni Garzoni de Bologne” in C. Caby and R.M. Dessi, eds., Les Humanistes et l’Eglise. Pratiques culturelles et échanges entre les litterati laïcs et ecclésiastiques (Italie, début XIIIe-début XVIe siècle). Paris/Nice: CNRS, 2012.  Pp. 195-214.
  • A Layman’s Life of St. Augustine: Patronage and Polemic” with edited text and appendix. Traditio 65 (2010): 231-86.
  • “Luca della Robbia’s Narrative on the Deaths of Boscoli and Capponi.”  In The Art of Executing Well:  Rituals of Execution in Renaissance Italy, edited by N. Terpstra.  Kirksville, MO:  Truman State University Press, 2008.
  • “Machiavelli, Trauma, and the Scandal of The Prince:  An Essay in Speculative History.”  In History in the Comic Mode:  Medieval Communities and the Matter of Person, edited by R. Fulton and B. Holsinger.  New York:  Columbia University Press, 2007.
  • Possible Lives:  Authors and Saints in Renaissance Italy.  New York:  Columbia University Press, 2005.
    Winner of the 2006 Gordon Prize from the Renaissance Society of America for the best book in Renaissance Studies.
  • “The First Instructions on Writing about Saints:  Aurelio Brandolini (c.1454-97) and Raffaele Maffei (1455-1522).” Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome 48 (2003).
  • “Katherine’s Place in a Renaissance Collection:  Evidence from Antonio degli Agli (c. 1400-1477), De vitis et gestis sanctorum.”  In St. Katherine of Alexandria.  Texts and Contexts in Western Medieval Europe, edited by Jacqueline Jenkins and Katherine Lewis.  Brepols:  Turnhout, 2003.

Forthcoming:

The Death of Pietro Paolo Boscoli: In the Mirror of THE PRINCE. Annotated translation of Luca della Robbia’s Recitazione, with three introductory chapters and appendices. Toronto: CRRS, expected submission 2016.

“Latin / Vernacular, Manuscript / Print, Venice / Siena: The Life of St. Catherine of Siena [BHL 1706a] by Lay Professor of Humanities Niccolò Borghesi (1432-1500)” with an edition of the text. In preparation.

 

Curriculum Vitae


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