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Gary Freeman

ProfessorPh.D., University of Wisconsin

Gary Freeman



Prof. Freeman specializes in the politics of immigration, comparative social policy, and politics in western democracies. His most recent writing has been directed at understanding the form of immigration politics in different countries and explaining the integration strategies employed by countries as they grapple with immigrant populations. He is currently working on the question of the linkage between immigration and the welfare state, especially the impact of ethnic and other forms of diversity on the solidaristic foundations of social policies.

In addition to two books, Immigrant Labor and Racial Conflict in Industrial Societies and Nations of Immigrants: Australia, the United States, and International Migration (edited with James Jupp), he is the author or co-author most recently of "National Models, Policy Types and the Politics of Immigration in Liberal Democracies," West European Politics (2006); "Disaggregating Immigration Policy: The Politics of Skilled Labor Recruitment in the U.S." (with David Hill), in Smith and Favell, eds., The Human Face of Global Mobility (2006); "Politics and Mass Immigration," in Goodin and Tilly, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Contextual Political Analysis (2006); "Does Politics Trump the Market in Contemporary Immigration?" in Guigni and Passy, eds., Dialogues on Migration Policy (2006); "Political Science and Comparative Immigration Politics," in Bommes and Morawska, International Migration Research (2005), and "Immigrant Incorporation in Western Democracies," International Migration Review (2004).


EUS 350 • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

36584 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 MEZ B0.306

Europe has experienced a remarkable transformation in the last century: from the mass destruction of World War II to the emergence of prosperous multiparty democracies, from the erection of the Iron Curtain to the fall of the Berlin Wall, from centuries-long divisions to a European Union of 28 states that stretches from Lisbon to Bucharest to Helsinki. Many of us know this recent past from history books, others have visited the other side of the Atlantic for vacation or study. But despite our apparent familiarity with our transatlantic neighbors, the governments and politics of Europe often remain unfamiliar. How exactly does a parliament work? Why are there so many political parties? How can governments just call new elections? How do European democracies compare with one another, and with the United States? European politics becomes even more mystifying when discussing the European Union, an entity encompassing 28 member states, over 500 million people, and one of the world’s largest economies. What is the European Union exactly? Is it an international organization, a federation of countries, or something else entirely? Who actually makes the decisions for Europe today?

This course will seek to answer to all of these questions by focusing on the major political, social, and economic dynamics shaping contemporary European politics. In the first part of the course, we will examine the historical origins of contemporary European politics, the features of parliamentary government, multiparty democracy and electoral systems, and other essentials of European politics today. We will highlight how these operate in a number of country contexts, but especially Great Britain, France, and Germany. The second half of the course will provide students with a detailed introduction to the European Union, including its tumultuous history, its decision-making institutions, and its relations with member states and the international community. Finally, the course will conclude with an investigation of some major policy issues and challenges in Europe today, notably the Euro crisis, European integration and enlargement, immigration, and European foreign policy.

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  • Center for European Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st Street
    Austin, Texas 78712