John Hoberman


ProfessorPh.D. Scandinavian Languages and Literature, University of California, Berkeley

John Hoberman

Contact

Biography


John Hoberman is a social and cultural historian who has researched and published extensively in the fields of sports studies, race studies, human enhancements, medical history, and globalization studies. His work in sports studies encompasses race relations, politics and the Olympics, and performance-enhancing drug use. His interests in medical history include the social and medical impacts of androgenic drugs (anabolic steroids) and the history of medical racism in the United States. He has lectured at many medical schools and other medical institutions on this topic.

 Prof. Hoberman is the author of Sport and Political Ideology (1984), The Olympic Crisis: Sport, Politics, and the Moral Order (1986), Mortal Engines: The Science of Performance and the Dehumanization of Sport (1992), Darwin’s Athletes: How Sport Has Damaged Black America and Preserved the Myth of Race (1997), Testosterone Dreams: Rejuvenation, Aphrodisia, Doping ((2005), Black & Blue: The Origins and Consequences of Medical Racism (2012), and Age of Globalization, the text of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) broadcast on the edX global platform during 2013 and 2014 and published online by the University of Texas Press in January 2014.

Prof. Hoberman has also published widely for general audiences. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street JournalForeign PolicyThe NationThe Wilson QuarterlySocietyScientific American, the Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionThe National (Canada), and Der Spiegel (Germany). Interviews with Prof. Hoberman have appeared in Norwegian, Swedish, French and German publications. Interviews on media outlets include all of the national networks: PBS, ABC. NBC, CBS, FOX, ABC (Australia), CBC (Canada), and BBC (UK).

 

Courses


EUS 346 • Anti-Semitism In Hist & Lit

35410 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GEA 114
(also listed as C L 323, GSD 360, J S 364)

FLAGS:   GC  |  Wr  | EL

Description:

The origins of Western (Christian) anti-Semitism can be traced to the Gospel of St John in the New Testament, which stigmatizes the Jews as “the children of the Devil.” Anti-Semitism thus originates in the religious feud that gradually intensified between the Jewish community and the followers of Jesus Christ. The early Church Fathers denounced the Jews using the most violent language, and a pattern was established. The first part of the course consists of an examination of the Christian critique of the Jews through the Middle Ages.

The second part of the course focuses primarily on the development of an intensified anti-Semitism in Europe during the 19th and 20th centuries, culminating in the Holocaust in Europe. Literary texts by Henri de Montherlant, Somerset Maugham, Aharon Applefeld, Ernest Hemingway, and Georges Perec are used to explore the nature of anti-Semitic perspectives on the Jews as a group or “tribe.” The course covers anti-Semitic developments up to the present day.

Selected Readings:

Ashley Montagu, "Are 'the' Jews a Race?" in Man's Most Dangerous Myth: The Fallacy of Race (1974): 353-377.

Léon Poliakov, "The Fateful Summer of 1096," in The History of Anti-Semitism, Vol. 1 (1974): 41-72. 

Léon Poliakov, "Activated Anti-Semitism: Germany," in The History of Anti-Semitism, Vol. 1 (1974): 210-245.

Joshua Trachtenberg, The Devil and the Jews (1943): 11-52.

David I. Kertzer, "Introduction," in The Popes Against the Jews: The Vatican's Role in the Rise of Modern Anti-Semitism  (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2001): 3-21.

George L. Mosse, "Eighteenth-Century Foundations," "The Birth of Stereotypes," "Nation, Language, and History," in Toward the Final Solution (1978): 1-50. 

John M. Efron, "The Jewish Body Degenerate?" in Medicine and the German Jews: A History (2001): 105-150.

Maurice Fishberg, "Pathological Characteristics," in The Jews: A Study of Race and Environment (1912): 270-295.

Somerset Maugham, “The Alien Corn” (1931).

Henri de Montherlant, “A Jew-Boy Goes to War” (1926).

Jean-Paul Sartre, Anti-Semite and Jew (1946): 7-54.

Michael H. Kater, “Everyday Anti-Semitism in Prewar Nazi Germany: The Popular Bases” (1984): 129-159.

Grading:

Examination #1  — 20% of grade

Examination #2 — 20% of final grade

Paper #1 (4 pages) — 10% of final grade

Paper #2 (4 pages) — 10% of final grade

Paper #3 (10 pages) — 40% of final grade

EUS 348 • Sports/Politics In Germany

35530 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GEA 114
(also listed as GSD 360)

FLAGS:   GC  |  Wr

Description:

Sport and other forms of physical culture have played important political roles in German history over the past two centuries. The gymnastics movement of the early 19th century promoted an intense German nationalism based on racial/ethnic identity. The late-19th century gymnastics movement was both politically conservative and engaged in an unsuccessful struggle with the foreign “sport” culture that eventually conquered the world in the form of the Olympic Games and global soccer. The 1936 Berlin (“Nazi”) Olympics promoted Hitler’s foreign policy objectives by serving as a propaganda platform that persuaded much of the world that Nazi Germany would not go to war. An anti-Nazi boycott effort in the United States did not succeed. The next German dictatorship to adopt sport as a political strategy was East Germany (1949-1989), which produced huge numbers of internationally successful athletes by creating a system of early recruitment, expert coaching, and a secret doping program that fed anabolic steroids to thousands of young men and women, including children: criminal medicine in the service of sportive nationalism. In recent decades, democratic Germany has pursued a very successful program to become a world soccer power. The 2006 World Cup competition in Germany marked a turning point by producing a politically acceptable form of German nationalism. The German victory at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil has confirmed traditional stereotypes about German efficiency that reflect well on Germany’s political system. The inclusion of players of non-German origin on the national team serves as a symbol of German multicultural policy in an era of troubled race relations across the face of Europe.

Selected Readings:

Léon Poliakov, “Arndt, Jahn and the Germanomanes,” in The History of Anti-Semitism: From Voltaire to Wagner (New York: The Vanguard Press, 1975): 380-391.

John Hoberman, “The Origins of Socialist Sport: Marxist Sport Culture in the Years of Innocence,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 170-189.

John Hoberman, “Fascism and the Sportive Temperament,” “Nietzsche and the Authority of the Body,” “Fascist Style and Sportive Manhood,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 83-109.

John M. Hoberman, “”Nazi Sport Theory: Racial Heroism and the Critique of Sport,” in Sport and Political Ideology (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1984): 162-169.

Marcel Reinold and John Hoberman, “The Myth of the Nazi Steroid,” The International Journal of the History of Sport  (2014).

Allen Guttmann, “’The Nazi Olympics’,” in The Games Must Go On: Avery Brundage and the Olympic Movement (New York: Columbia University Press, 1984): 62-82.

Richard Mandell, The Nazi Olympics (1971).

Alan Tomlinson, “FIFA and the Men Who Made It,” Soccer & Society 1 (2000): 55-71.

Werner Krauss, “Football, Nation and Identity: German Miracles in the Post-War Era,” in Dyck, Noel and Eduardo P. Archetti, eds., Sport, Dance and Embodied Identities (Oxford and New York: Berg, 2003): 197-216.

John Hoberman, “The Politics of Doping in Germany,” “The German Sports Medical Establishment,” in Mortal Engines: The Science of Performance and the Dehumanization of Sport (New York: Free Press, 1992): 237-252, 252-265.

John Hoberman. "The Reunification of German Sports Medicine, 1989-1992," Quest 45 (1993): 277-285.

Werner W. Franke and Brigitte Berendonk, “Hormonal doping and androgenization of athletes: a secret doping program of the German Democratic Republic government,” Clinical Chemistry 43 (1997): 1262-1279.

Grading:

Examination #1 (25%)

Examination #2 (25%)

Quizzes (5 worth 5% apiece)

Term paper (25%)

EUS 306 • Bad Blood

36820 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm JES A217A
(also listed as GRC 301)

INTRODUCTION

During the nineteenth century, important scientific developments promoted a popular theory of “race.” Perhaps the most famous are Darwin’s theories, which paved the way for the development of physical anthropology, Social Darwinism and scientific speculations about biological traits that supposedly characterized the various “races.” Biological typing of human beings became a standard procedure for establishing physical and psychological “differences” between human populations – the precursor to today’s racial profiling. The history of these ideas provides us with a way to understand how pseudo-scientific “racial” representations of vulnerable minorities in popular literature and mass media, during the nineteenth century and up to the present day. have influenced the lives of millions of people and shaped our own thinking about “racial” difference.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed to meet four objectives: 

     1) to introduce you to biological typing in the nineteenth century with particular attention given to German-speaking countries;

     2) to build skills in critical cultural literacy by analyzing how developments in science influenced other domains; such as criminology (Lombroso), film (“M”), mental illness (Nordau), and gender and racial repression;

     3) to encourage you to consider the legacy of biological typing and its implications for contemporary society; and

     4) to assist you in refining your writing skills.  

EUS 347 • Socl Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

37000 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GEA 114
(also listed as C L 323, E 322, SCA 323)

Description:

This course offers a detailed introduction to Ibsen's social dramas (1877-1899), emphasizing their unity as a prolonged commentary on the society of his era and the variety of its human problems. Eight of the twelve plays are read in chronological order so as to show how each play stands in relation to those which precede or follow. Particular attention is paid to how Ibsen interprets basic human situations in different ways in different plays. Ibsen's patterned use of certain Norwegian words to create thematic ties between specific plays and characters is explored. The course pays special attention to the following topics: (1) the family, the home, the sphere of private life and their relationship to the public world of reputation, work, and citizenship; (2) the predicaments and choices of men and women in a male-dominated society; (3) Ibsen's interest in biological themes such as health, sickness, and heredity; (4) the origins and risks of various kinds of human creativity; and (5) the motives of interventions into the lives of others

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

EUS 346 • Scandinavia And Globalization

36735 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 337
(also listed as SCA 335)

Description:

Globalization, the greatest project in human history, is an historical process that encompasses worldwide cultural and economic integration. This new global order is characterized by multinational corporations and an increasingly free flow of capital and labor across the world, internationalizing the products, services, careers, travel opportunities, and mass media programming that are now available to people everywhere. All countries must now adapt to changing economies and the cultural trends transnational markets carry around the world. Cultural globalization has been driven largely by American influences -- popular music, television programming, and Hollywood films -- along with the sheer power of the English language to insinuate itself into virtually all aspects of modern experience. 

Scandinavia consists of five small countries (Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Iceland) which, like nations everywhere, must adapt to the merciless competition of globalization by innovating and drawing upon their own social, cultural, and natural resources. In fact, Scandinavia is a conspicuously prosperous and peaceful region that has developed the most effective welfare state models in the world. This is one reason why Scandinavian societies have met the challenges of globalization and labor competition from low-wage countries so effectively. At the same time, these very small countries are vulnerable to various globalization pressures such as military threats, world economic instability, European Union policies, the charismatic influence of American popular culture, U.S.- based social media platforms, and the power of the English language to infiltrate small languages and even threaten their eventual extinction.

Yet these small Scandinavian countries also have ways of asserting themselves, via diplomatic initiatives, displays of moral leadership, the exporting of cultural products (especially films), and the production of medal-winning athletes and chess champions (Magnus Carlsen of Norway). In summary, this course examines how the small Scandinavian countries have coped with political and cultural vulnerability while cultivating the components of national identity that sustain small populations through traumatic national experiences as severe as military occupation and as intractable as peacetime economic competition with much more powerful economies and cultural products. 

Selected Texts:

Manfred Steger: Globalization: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2009)

"Can the Scandinavian Model Adapt to Globalization?" (Scandinavian Studies, 2004)

Christine Ingebritsen, "Ecological Institutionalism: Scandinavia and the Greening of Global Capitalism" (Scandinavian Studies, 2012)

Hans Hognestad, "Transglobal Scandinavian? Globalization and the contestation of identities in football" (Soccer & Society, 2009)

Grading/Requirements:

Examination #1      20%

Examination #2      20%

4-page Paper         20%

Term Paper             40%

EUS 347 • Socl Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

36405 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GEA 114
(also listed as E 322, SCA 323, WGS 345)

Description:

This course offers a detailed introduction to Ibsen's social dramas (1877-1899), emphasizing their unity as a prolonged commentary on the society of his era and the variety of its human problems. Eight of the twelve plays are read in chronological order so as to show how each play stands in relation to those which precede or follow. Particular attention is paid to how Ibsen interprets basic human situations in different ways in different plays. Ibsen's patterned use of certain Norwegian words to create thematic ties between specific plays and characters is explored. The course pays special attention to the following topics: (1) the family, the home, the sphere of private life and their relationship to the public world of reputation, work, and citizenship; (2) the predicaments and choices of men and women in a male-dominated society; (3) Ibsen's interest in biological themes such as health, sickness, and heredity; (4) the origins and risks of various kinds of human creativity; and (5) the motives of interventions into the lives of others

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

Texts:

Haugen, Einar.  Ibsen's Drama: Author to Audience, University of Minnesota Press; Ibsen (Rolf Fjelde,trans.); The Complete Major Prose Plays, NAL; Additional critical essays will be distributed in photocopied form.

Requirements & Grading:

Students will write three papers between six and eight pages in length, one of which may be substantially revised (60%). There will also be a final examination and occasional quizzes (40%).

 

EUS 306 • Bad Blood

36255 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.124
(also listed as GRC 301)

INTRODUCTION

During the nineteenth century, important scientific developments promoted a popular theory of “race.” Perhaps the most famous are Darwin’s theories, which paved the way for the development of physical anthropology, Social Darwinism and scientific speculations about biological traits that supposedly characterized the various “races.” Biological typing of human beings became a standard procedure for establishing physical and psychological “differences” between human populations – the precursor to today’s racial profiling. The history of these ideas provides us with a way to understand how pseudo-scientific “racial” representations of vulnerable minorities in popular literature and mass media, during the nineteenth century and up to the present day. have influenced the lives of millions of people and shaped our own thinking about “racial” difference.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed to meet four objectives:

      1) to introduce you to biological typing in the nineteenth century with particular attention given to German-speaking countries;

      2) to build skills in critical cultural literacy by analyzing how developments in science influenced other domains; such as criminology (Lombroso), film (“M”), mental illness (Nordau), and gender and racial repression;

      3) to encourage you to consider the legacy of biological typing and its implications for contemporary society; and

      4) to assist you in refining your writing skills. 

REQUIRED TEXTS:

1. Course Packet available at Jenn’s Copy (approx. $45),2200 Guadalupe St (Lower Level), 473-8669.

2. Films on reserve at the Flawn Academic Center (FAC, formerly UGL)

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING (See Guidelines and Grading for Assignments section)

40%    Homework Assignments and Quizzes (in-class quizzes on homework assignments; worksheets to accompany assigned readings and prepare for class discussions)

20%    In-class examinations.

40 %    Critical Review Papers (5 papers, each 2-3 pp). 

Final grades will be assigned based on the traditional scale:A = 90-100%; B = 80-89%; C = 70-79%; D = 60-69%; F = 0-59%

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

35950 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 337

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the significance of "United Europe" as a historical necessity and a historical accident, and how various political entities and social problems work for or against that unification

  • frame arguments about Europe in terms of the needs and experiences of three post-war generations' politics and experiences

  • find and assess current event and scholarly sources pertaining to the study of contemporary Europe, justifying their pertinence and quality with references to today's research norms.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    Scholars often claim that "Europe does not exist." Yet the continent is there, home to a bewildering puzzle of

    many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union -- a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey. As the political, social and economic relationships among the member states of that European Union shift on an official level, Europe and European identities have constantly to be (re)defined and renegotiated, and "average Europeans" seek to understand the relationships between official accounts of "their" situations, the histories they were taught in school and by their families, and their everyday experiences.

    What, then, does it mean to study a Europe that is in flux this way? This course cannot answer that question straightforwardly, because US scholars in the social sciences and humanities who claim allegiance to "European Studies" all use different disciplines' strategies for understanding "Europe."

    To resolve that problem in another way, this course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent. Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states -- to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

    A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them. Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure.

    The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union. The next part of the course will introduce the evolving structure of European governance as a precursor to discussion of case studies about what this "Europeanization" does to individuals, groups, and nation-states.

    In the transition from official Europe to Europe's culture, the class will present resources and desiderata for researching issues in the European Studies context. The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. In each case, readings form official sources are juxtaposed with news sources, writings from think tanks, and academic writing. The purpose of using official sources is to give students a springboard for juxtapositions between the "European" points of view and national ones that they research as the semester goes on.

    Assignments in this course are designed to introduce students to the materials, research strategies, and forms of professional communication that they will encounter later in specific disciplines' versions of European studies. The assignments build on each other to help each learner acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses.

    This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

    ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

305 Course Description, 1

  • Chapter review = 10%

  • Webpage: 5 tasks (one in two parts) assigned in syllabus to situate your country = 10%

    (2 points each: one for submitting it on time, one for correctness)

  • Source Analysis Assignment = 10%

  • Three one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 30%

  • Policy Brief= 20%

  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar = 20%

    READINGS: BOOK TO BUY

    Tony Judt. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: The Penguin Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59420-065- 3. [[ORDERED AT COOP]]

    READINGS: PDFed materials on Class Canvas Site

    Michel de Certeau, Luce Giard, and Pierre Mayol. The Practice of Everyday Life, Vol. 2: Living and Cooking. Trans. Timothy J. Tomasik. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998, plus two pages from Volume 1.

    Jonathan W. Garlough. "Weighing in on the Wine Wars." William and Mary Law Review 46/4 (2005): Article 13.
    Richard Goff, et al. The Twentieth Century and Beyond: A Global History. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 (excerpts). Tony Judt, A Grand Illusion?: An Essay on Europe. New York: New York UP, 2011 [orig. 1996]. ISBN 978-0-8147-4358-4. Ruth Keeling. "The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Research Agenda: the European Commission’s expanding role in higher

    education discourse." European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 2 (2006)
    Magdalini Kolokitha. “It’s the End of the ‘University’ as we know it.” Unpublished speech: First RESUP International

    Conference. Paris 1st, 2nd and 3rd February 2007."European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country

    Nationals." N. P.: European Commission, 2011.
    "Migration and Integration in Europe: State of the Research." ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS).

    Oxford: Oxford University, 2008.

    WEB-BASED READINGS ON SYLLABUS

    Many readings are parts of websites. Generally, an excerpt from Wikipedia is present for its readibility, but WIkipedia is only usable as a point of comparison, not as "official" materials, which need to be found on official websites for governments and entities. The online archives of the various European Agencies, moreover, contain reference materials that are straightforwardly considered government documents. Use Wikipedia to steer you toward the right names and issues, especially in an area like European Studies, which present a dizzying array of names, dates, and quotations. Use websites that stem from the organizations themselves for quoting and for authoritative definitions in your written work; use scholarly literature for definitive work on your final projects.

    CLASS WEBSITE: Canvas Learning System
    BANDWIDTH: You will need enough bandwidth to post newslinks with commentary 5 times during the semester 

EUS 347 • Socl Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

36090 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GEA 114
(also listed as C L 323, E 322, SCA 323, WGS 345)

Description:
This course offers a detailed introduction to Ibsen's social dramas (1877-1899), emphasizing their unity as a prolonged commentary on the society of his era and the variety of its human problems. Eight of the twelve plays are read in chronological order so as to show how each play stands in relation to those which precede or follow. Particular attention is paid to how Ibsen interprets basic human situations in different ways in different plays. Ibsen's patterned use of certain Norwegian words to create thematic ties between specific plays and characters is explored. The course pays special attention to the following topics: (1) the family, the home, the sphere of private life and their relationship to the public world of reputation, work, and citizenship; (2) the predicaments and choices of men and women in a male-dominated society; (3) Ibsen's interest in biological themes such as health, sickness, and heredity; (4) the origins and risks of various kinds of human creativity; and (5) the motives of interventions into the lives of others.

Possible Texts/Readings:
Haugen, Einar. Ibsen's Drama: Author to Audience, Univ. of Minnesota Press
Ibsen (Rolf Fjelde,trans.) The Complete Major Prose Plays, NAL
Additional critical essays will be distributed in photocopied form.

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

36075 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm RLM 5.112

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the significance of "United Europe" as a historical necessity and a historical accident, and how various political entities and social problems work for or against that unification

  • frame arguments about Europe in terms of the needs and experiences of three post-war generations' politics and experiences

  • find and assess current event and scholarly sources pertaining to the study of contemporary Europe, justifying their pertinence and quality with references to today's research norms.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    Scholars often claim that "Europe does not exist." Yet the continent is there, home to a bewildering puzzle of

    many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union -- a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey. As the political, social and economic relationships among the member states of that European Union shift on an official level, Europe and European identities have constantly to be (re)defined and renegotiated, and "average Europeans" seek to understand the relationships between official accounts of "their" situations, the histories they were taught in school and by their families, and their everyday experiences.

    What, then, does it mean to study a Europe that is in flux this way? This course cannot answer that question straightforwardly, because US scholars in the social sciences and humanities who claim allegiance to "European Studies" all use different disciplines' strategies for understanding "Europe."

    To resolve that problem in another way, this course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent. Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states -- to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

    A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them. Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure.

    The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union. The next part of the course will introduce the evolving structure of European governance as a precursor to discussion of case studies about what this "Europeanization" does to individuals, groups, and nation-states.

    In the transition from official Europe to Europe's culture, the class will present resources and desiderata for researching issues in the European Studies context. The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. In each case, readings form official sources are juxtaposed with news sources, writings from think tanks, and academic writing. The purpose of using official sources is to give students a springboard for juxtapositions between the "European" points of view and national ones that they research as the semester goes on.

    Assignments in this course are designed to introduce students to the materials, research strategies, and forms of professional communication that they will encounter later in specific disciplines' versions of European studies. The assignments build on each other to help each learner acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses.

    This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

    ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

305 Course Description, 1

  • Chapter review = 10%

  • Webpage: 5 tasks (one in two parts) assigned in syllabus to situate your country = 10%

    (2 points each: one for submitting it on time, one for correctness)

  • Source Analysis Assignment = 10%

  • Three one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 30%

  • Policy Brief= 20%

  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar = 20%

    READINGS: BOOK TO BUY

    Tony Judt. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: The Penguin Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59420-065- 3. [[ORDERED AT COOP]]

    READINGS: PDFed materials on Class Canvas Site

    Michel de Certeau, Luce Giard, and Pierre Mayol. The Practice of Everyday Life, Vol. 2: Living and Cooking. Trans. Timothy J. Tomasik. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998, plus two pages from Volume 1.

    Jonathan W. Garlough. "Weighing in on the Wine Wars." William and Mary Law Review 46/4 (2005): Article 13.
    Richard Goff, et al. The Twentieth Century and Beyond: A Global History. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 (excerpts). Tony Judt, A Grand Illusion?: An Essay on Europe. New York: New York UP, 2011 [orig. 1996]. ISBN 978-0-8147-4358-4. Ruth Keeling. "The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Research Agenda: the European Commission’s expanding role in higher

    education discourse." European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 2 (2006)
    Magdalini Kolokitha. “It’s the End of the ‘University’ as we know it.” Unpublished speech: First RESUP International

    Conference. Paris 1st, 2nd and 3rd February 2007."European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country

    Nationals." N. P.: European Commission, 2011.
    "Migration and Integration in Europe: State of the Research." ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS).

    Oxford: Oxford University, 2008.

    WEB-BASED READINGS ON SYLLABUS

    Many readings are parts of websites. Generally, an excerpt from Wikipedia is present for its readibility, but WIkipedia is only usable as a point of comparison, not as "official" materials, which need to be found on official websites for governments and entities. The online archives of the various European Agencies, moreover, contain reference materials that are straightforwardly considered government documents. Use Wikipedia to steer you toward the right names and issues, especially in an area like European Studies, which present a dizzying array of names, dates, and quotations. Use websites that stem from the organizations themselves for quoting and for authoritative definitions in your written work; use scholarly literature for definitive work on your final projects.

    CLASS WEBSITE: Canvas Learning System
    BANDWIDTH: You will need enough bandwidth to post newslinks with commentary 5 times during the semester 

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links



  • Center for European Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st Street
    A1800
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-232-3470