Marc Pierce


Associate ProfessorPh.D, Germanic Linguistics, University of Michigan

Assistant Professor
Marc Pierce

Contact

Courses


EUS 346 • Hist Backgrounds Of German Civ

36899 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm BUR 337
(also listed as GER 340C)

These courses cover the topics of European Anthropology, Geography, History, and Sociology

EUS F307 • Grimms' Fairy Tales

84100 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm BUR 337
(also listed as C L F305, GRC F301)

This course focuses on one of the most popular works of German literature, the Kinder- und Hausmärchen of the Brothers Grimm.  After a biographical introduction and a brief discussion of the Grimms’ contributions to various scholarly fields, we will spend the bulk of the semester reading and discussing tales from the Grimms’ collection, as well as some of the relevant secondary literature on the tales.  We will address questions like the following: In what cultural context did Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm collect their fairy tales?  Who did they get the tales from?  Do the tales really reflect Germanic culture, or have they been revised in line with the Grimms’ personal beliefs?  Do the tales advocate any specific values (“the moral of the story is…”)?  We will also look at possible interpretations of the tales from different theoretical perspectives (feminist, psychoanalytic, etc.).  Knowledge of German is not required, as all readings and discussions are in English.  However, if you do know German, I strongly encourage you to read at least some of the tales in German. 

Required Texts:

Maria Tatar, The Hard Facts of the Grimms’ Fairy Tales, expanded 2d ed.

Jack Zipes, The Brothers Grimm: From Enchanted Forests to the Modern World, 2d ed.

Jack Zipes (editor and translator), The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm

[These texts are available at the University Co-Op.]

Additional texts may be distributed as necessary by the instructor.

Grading scheme:

Papers:    20%

Tests:      50%

Attendance and Participation:    20%

EUS 307 • Grimms' Fairy Tales-W

83660 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm RLM 5.112
(also listed as C L 305, GRC 301)

Description:
This course focuses on one of the most popular works of German literature, the Kinder- und Hausmärchen of the Brothers Grimm.  After a biographical introduction and a brief discussion of the Grimms’ contributions to various scholarly fields, we will spend the bulk of the semester reading and discussing tales from the Grimms’ collection, as well as some of the relevant secondary literature on the tales.  We will address questions like the following: In what cultural context did Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm collect their fairy tales?  Who did they get the tales from?  Do the tales really reflect Germanic culture, or have they been revised in line with the Grimms’ personal beliefs?  Do the tales advocate any specific values (“the moral of the story is…”)?  We will also look at possible interpretations of the tales from different theoretical perspectives (feminist, psychoanalytic, etc.).  Knowledge of German is not required, as all readings and discussions are in English.  However, if you do know German, I strongly encourage you to read at least some of the tales in German. 


Required Texts:
Maria Tatar, The Hard Facts of the Grimms’ Fairy Tales, expanded 2d ed.
Jack Zipes, The Brothers Grimm: From Enchanted Forests to the Modern World, 2d ed.
Jack Zipes (editor and translator), The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm
[These texts are available at the University Co-Op.]
Additional texts may be distributed as necessary by the instructor.


Grading scheme:
Papers:                20%
Tests:                50%
Attendance and Participation:    20%

Publications


2014    Hans C. Boas, Marc Pierce, and Collin Brown.  On the variability of Texas German wo as a complementizer.  Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung —Language Typology and Universals 67: 589-611.

2014    The Further Degrammaticalization of ishAmerican Speech 89: 115-118.

2013    Syllable Weight in Gothic.  Indogermanische Forschungen 118: 213-226.

2013    The Onset Principle in Finnish.  Nordic Prosody: Proceedings of the XIth Conference, Tartu 2012, edited by Eva Liina Asu and Pärtel Lippus, 283-291.  Frankfurt: Peter Lang.

2012    Zum Status des Onset-Prinzips im Altenglischen.  Anglia 130: 526-532.

2012    Evaluating the Evidence for Old Norse Syllable Structure.  Vox Germanica: Essays in Germanic Culture in Honor of James E. Cathey, edited by Stephen Harris, Michael Moynihan, and Sherrill Harbison, 49-67.  Tempe, AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

2011    On the Resilience of Edgerton’s Law.  Folia Linguistica Historica 32: 189-218.

2011    The Status of the Onset Principle in Early Germanic.  Proceedings of the 22d Annual UCLA Indo-European Conference, edited by Stephanie W. Jamison, H. Craig Melchert, and Brent Vine, 193-208.  Bremen: Hempen Verlag.

2010    Marc Pierce and Hans C. Boas.  First Diminutive Formation and [d]-Epenthesis in Yiddish.  Interdisciplinary Journal for Germanic Linguistics and Semiotic Analysis 15: 213-230.

2010    Slobbovia: An Etymological Note.  American Speech 85: 464-465.

2010     Hans C. Boas, Marc Pierce, Hunter Weilbacher, Karen Roesch, and Guido Halder.  The Texas German Dialect Archive: A Multimedia Resource for Research, Teaching, and Outreach.  Journal of Germanic Linguistics 22: 277-296.

2010     An Overview of Old Saxon Linguistics, 1992 to 2008.  Perspectives on the Old Saxon Heliand: Introductory and Critical Essays, with an Edition of the Leipzig Fragment, edited by Valentine Pakis, 63-89.  Morgantown, WV: West Virginia University Press.

 

 

Profile Pages



  • Center for European Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st Street
    A1800
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-232-3470