Per Urlaub


Assistant ProfessorPh.D., German Studies, Stanford University

Per Urlaub

Contact

  • Phone: 5162-232-4355
  • Office: BUR 330
  • Office Hours: Monday 2-4
  • Campus Mail Code: C3300

Interests


German Studies, Reading Research, Second Language Studies, Language and Culture, Curriculum

Courses


EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

35340 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 208

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the significance of "United Europe" as a historical necessity and a historical accident, and how various political entities and social problems work for or against that unification

  • frame arguments about Europe in terms of the needs and experiences of three post-war generations' politics and experiences

  • find and assess current event and scholarly sources pertaining to the study of contemporary Europe, justifying their pertinence and quality with references to today's research norms.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    Scholars often claim that "Europe does not exist." Yet the continent is there, home to a bewildering puzzle of

    many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union -- a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey. As the political, social and economic relationships among the member states of that European Union shift on an official level, Europe and European identities have constantly to be (re)defined and renegotiated, and "average Europeans" seek to understand the relationships between official accounts of "their" situations, the histories they were taught in school and by their families, and their everyday experiences.

    What, then, does it mean to study a Europe that is in flux this way? This course cannot answer that question straightforwardly, because US scholars in the social sciences and humanities who claim allegiance to "European Studies" all use different disciplines' strategies for understanding "Europe."

    To resolve that problem in another way, this course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent. Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states -- to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

    A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them. Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure.

    The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union. The next part of the course will introduce the evolving structure of European governance as a precursor to discussion of case studies about what this "Europeanization" does to individuals, groups, and nation-states.

    In the transition from official Europe to Europe's culture, the class will present resources and desiderata for researching issues in the European Studies context. The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. In each case, readings form official sources are juxtaposed with news sources, writings from think tanks, and academic writing. The purpose of using official sources is to give students a springboard for juxtapositions between the "European" points of view and national ones that they research as the semester goes on.

    Assignments in this course are designed to introduce students to the materials, research strategies, and forms of professional communication that they will encounter later in specific disciplines' versions of European studies. The assignments build on each other to help each learner acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses.

    This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

    ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

305 Course Description, 1

  • Chapter review = 10%

  • Webpage: 5 tasks (one in two parts) assigned in syllabus to situate your country = 10%

    (2 points each: one for submitting it on time, one for correctness)

  • Source Analysis Assignment = 10%

  • Three one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 30%

  • Policy Brief= 20%

  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar = 20%

    READINGS: BOOK TO BUY

    Tony Judt. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: The Penguin Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59420-065- 3. [[ORDERED AT COOP]]

    READINGS: PDFed materials on Class Canvas Site

    Michel de Certeau, Luce Giard, and Pierre Mayol. The Practice of Everyday Life, Vol. 2: Living and Cooking. Trans. Timothy J. Tomasik. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998, plus two pages from Volume 1.

    Jonathan W. Garlough. "Weighing in on the Wine Wars." William and Mary Law Review 46/4 (2005): Article 13.
    Richard Goff, et al. The Twentieth Century and Beyond: A Global History. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 (excerpts). Tony Judt, A Grand Illusion?: An Essay on Europe. New York: New York UP, 2011 [orig. 1996]. ISBN 978-0-8147-4358-4. Ruth Keeling. "The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Research Agenda: the European Commission’s expanding role in higher

    education discourse." European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 2 (2006)
    Magdalini Kolokitha. “It’s the End of the ‘University’ as we know it.” Unpublished speech: First RESUP International

    Conference. Paris 1st, 2nd and 3rd February 2007."European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country

    Nationals." N. P.: European Commission, 2011.
    "Migration and Integration in Europe: State of the Research." ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS).

    Oxford: Oxford University, 2008.

    WEB-BASED READINGS ON SYLLABUS

    Many readings are parts of websites. Generally, an excerpt from Wikipedia is present for its readibility, but WIkipedia is only usable as a point of comparison, not as "official" materials, which need to be found on official websites for governments and entities. The online archives of the various European Agencies, moreover, contain reference materials that are straightforwardly considered government documents. Use Wikipedia to steer you toward the right names and issues, especially in an area like European Studies, which present a dizzying array of names, dates, and quotations. Use websites that stem from the organizations themselves for quoting and for authoritative definitions in your written work; use scholarly literature for definitive work on your final projects.

    CLASS WEBSITE: Canvas Learning System
    BANDWIDTH: You will need enough bandwidth to post newslinks with commentary 5 times during the semester 

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

36815 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm RLM 5.104

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the significance of "United Europe" as a historical necessity and a historical accident, and how various political entities and social problems work for or against that unification

  • frame arguments about Europe in terms of the needs and experiences of three post-war generations' politics and experiences

  • find and assess current event and scholarly sources pertaining to the study of contemporary Europe, justifying their pertinence and quality with references to today's research norms.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    Scholars often claim that "Europe does not exist." Yet the continent is there, home to a bewildering puzzle of

    many different histories, nations, cultures and languages, with more than 450 million people now living in the European Union -- a Union that argues whether it can stay together as part of the "Eurozone" or even expand eastward to include supposedly "non-Christian" countries like Turkey. As the political, social and economic relationships among the member states of that European Union shift on an official level, Europe and European identities have constantly to be (re)defined and renegotiated, and "average Europeans" seek to understand the relationships between official accounts of "their" situations, the histories they were taught in school and by their families, and their everyday experiences.

    What, then, does it mean to study a Europe that is in flux this way? This course cannot answer that question straightforwardly, because US scholars in the social sciences and humanities who claim allegiance to "European Studies" all use different disciplines' strategies for understanding "Europe."

    To resolve that problem in another way, this course will start by introducing several earlier attempts to make a more united, and presumably more peaceful and prosperous, "Europe" out of the nation-states on the continent. Each "imagined" Europe, as we shall see, was proposed to correct problems with the nation-states -- to change politics and everyday lives in particular ways.

    A recent history of post-World-War-II Europe by Tony Judt will anchor the class' original work on Europe and its member nations. Judt tells the continent's story from the point of view of the era's global power politics, and then situates individual European states within them. Judt's text, then, provides accounts of Europe from the top-down and points to moments when those official accounts diverge for particular states and when they place individuals and groups who do not fit the national stereotypes under pressure.

    The historical account of Europe as seen from the point of view of world politics is an interesting counterpoint to the evolution of European government since World War II, as realized in the Council of Europe and the European Union. The next part of the course will introduce the evolving structure of European governance as a precursor to discussion of case studies about what this "Europeanization" does to individuals, groups, and nation-states.

    In the transition from official Europe to Europe's culture, the class will present resources and desiderata for researching issues in the European Studies context. The largest section of the course is devoted to a workshop on issues in contemporary Europe. In each case, readings form official sources are juxtaposed with news sources, writings from think tanks, and academic writing. The purpose of using official sources is to give students a springboard for juxtapositions between the "European" points of view and national ones that they research as the semester goes on.

    Assignments in this course are designed to introduce students to the materials, research strategies, and forms of professional communication that they will encounter later in specific disciplines' versions of European studies. The assignments build on each other to help each learner acquire a body of skills and knowledge that will aid in their personal studies of Europe and in their major courses.

    This course is the introductory core course for a concentration or major in European Studies at UT, but it requires no prerequisites except for the willingness to work in collaboration with others and to engage in a discovery process rather than seeking "right" answers.

    ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

305 Course Description, 1

  • Chapter review = 10%

  • Webpage: 5 tasks (one in two parts) assigned in syllabus to situate your country = 10%

    (2 points each: one for submitting it on time, one for correctness)

  • Source Analysis Assignment = 10%

  • Three one-hour online tests @ 10% each = 30%

  • Policy Brief= 20%

  • Final Evaluative Book Review of Postwar = 20%

    READINGS: BOOK TO BUY

    Tony Judt. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: The Penguin Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59420-065- 3. [[ORDERED AT COOP]]

    READINGS: PDFed materials on Class Canvas Site

    Michel de Certeau, Luce Giard, and Pierre Mayol. The Practice of Everyday Life, Vol. 2: Living and Cooking. Trans. Timothy J. Tomasik. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998, plus two pages from Volume 1.

    Jonathan W. Garlough. "Weighing in on the Wine Wars." William and Mary Law Review 46/4 (2005): Article 13.
    Richard Goff, et al. The Twentieth Century and Beyond: A Global History. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 (excerpts). Tony Judt, A Grand Illusion?: An Essay on Europe. New York: New York UP, 2011 [orig. 1996]. ISBN 978-0-8147-4358-4. Ruth Keeling. "The Bologna Process and the Lisbon Research Agenda: the European Commission’s expanding role in higher

    education discourse." European Journal of Education, Vol. 41, No. 2 (2006)
    Magdalini Kolokitha. “It’s the End of the ‘University’ as we know it.” Unpublished speech: First RESUP International

    Conference. Paris 1st, 2nd and 3rd February 2007."European Agenda for the Integration of Third-Country

    Nationals." N. P.: European Commission, 2011.
    "Migration and Integration in Europe: State of the Research." ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS).

    Oxford: Oxford University, 2008.

    WEB-BASED READINGS ON SYLLABUS

    Many readings are parts of websites. Generally, an excerpt from Wikipedia is present for its readibility, but WIkipedia is only usable as a point of comparison, not as "official" materials, which need to be found on official websites for governments and entities. The online archives of the various European Agencies, moreover, contain reference materials that are straightforwardly considered government documents. Use Wikipedia to steer you toward the right names and issues, especially in an area like European Studies, which present a dizzying array of names, dates, and quotations. Use websites that stem from the organizations themselves for quoting and for authoritative definitions in your written work; use scholarly literature for definitive work on your final projects.

    CLASS WEBSITE: Canvas Learning System
    BANDWIDTH: You will need enough bandwidth to post newslinks with commentary 5 times during the semester 

Publications


See curriculum vitae 

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages



  • Center for European Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st Street
    A1800
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-232-3470