The Department of French and Italian

Marc Bizer


ProfessorPhD, Princeton University

Professor of French Literature
Marc Bizer

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-7780
  • Office: HRH 3.112B
  • Office Hours: Tu Th 11-12 and by appt.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7600

Interests


early modern Europe & France, classical reception, national identity, gender, tragedy and the tragic

Biography


Marc Bizer, originally from Amherst, Massachusetts, has taught at UT since 1992. He holds an A.B. in Comparative Literature from Brown University, a Maîtrise ès lettres modernes from the Université de Paris-Sorbonne, and a Ph.D. in Romance Languages and Literatures from Princeton University. He is the author of three books, as well as of numerous articles: Homer and the Politics of Authority in Renaissance France (Oxford University Press, 2011), Les Lettres Romaines de Du Bellay: Les Regrets et la Tradition Epistolaire (University of Montreal Press, 2001), and La Poésie au Miroir: Imitation et Conscience de soi dans la Poésie Latine de la Pléiade (Champion, 1995). He is the recipient of sabbatical fellowships from the Fulbright Scholar Program, the American Philosophical Society, and the Loeb Classical Library Foundation. He won a silver award for innovative instructional technology for his Reading Between the Lines web site (2008).

Book cover

Courses


FR 326K • Intro Fr Lit I: Mid Ages-18c

35795 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BEN 1.108

Fall 2015

FR 326K : Introduction to French Literature I

 

Course Description

This course will be taught in French and carries a Global Cultures flag

This course is designed not only to familiarize you with the important texts, literary traditions, and genres of French literature from its beginnings to the 18th century, but teach you the techniques of close literary analysis through historical and cultural contextualization, in particular the practice of the explication de texte. Much learning in the course will take place through group work.

Readings

Littérature française: Textes et contextes, Tome I, R.-J. Berg

Racine, Phèdre

Course packet

 

Grading Policy

Class Participation                               15%

Quizzes                                              10%

Discussions/exercises on Canvas          10%

Two 4-5 page papers   (2 x 15%)         30%

Exams  (10%, 10%, 15%)                   35%

FR 358 • French Literature & Gastronomy

35815 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 2.122

Eating is commonly recognized as an integral (and problematic) part of national and individual identity. This course will focus on the evolving relationship between eating and identity by looking at cultural, literary, and filmic manifestations accounts of eating (including cannibalism), and gastronomy from the medieval period to the present, in literature, cultural criticism, and film. Our understanding of this relationship will be enlightened and enlivened by various historical, psychoanalytic, and philosophical readings.  

Readings:

Medieval

Lai d’Ignauré

Roman du chatelaine de Couci et de la dame de Fayel

La Châtelaine de Vergi

Renaissance

Rabelais, Œuvres (extraits)

Montaigne, “Des cannibales”

17e siècle

La Fontaine, Fables

Madame de Sévigné: Lettre sur la mort de Vatel

18e siècle

L’Encyclopédie (extraits photocopiés)

Brillat-Savarin, Physiologie du gout

Grimod de la Reynière

19e siècle

Baudelaire, Les paradis artificiels

Gautier, divers poems sur le haschisch et l’opium

Balzac, “Traité des excitants modernes”

Zola, Le Ventre de Paris et Germinal

Charles Monselet, critique gastronomique

20e siècle

poems de Valéry, Ponge

Proust, extraits de A la recherché du temps perdu

Roland Barthes, Mythologies et L’Empire des signes (extraits)

 

films:

Le Festin de Babette

Vatel

Le Charme Discret de la Bourgeoisie

La Grande Bouffe

 

Grading:

Participation                           20%

Commentaires de lecture         10%

Presentation                            10%

Short paper                             25%

FR 326K • Intro Fr Lit I: Mid Ages-18c

36035 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.210

 Spring 2015

FR 326K : Introduction to French Literature I

 

Course Description

This course will be taught in French and carries a Global Cultures flag

This course is designed not only to familiarize you with the important texts, literary traditions, and genres of French literature from its beginnings to the 18th century, but teach you the techniques of close literary analysis through historical and cultural contextualization, in particular the practice of the explication de texte. Much learning in the course will take place through group work.

Readings

Littérature française: Textes et contextes, Tome I, R.-J. Berg

Racine, Phèdre

Course packet

 

Grading Policy

Class Participation                               15%

Quizzes                                              10%

Discussions/exercises on Canvas          10%

Two 4-5 page papers   (2 x 15%)         30%

Exams  (10%, 10%, 15%)                   35%

FR 180P • Intro To Studies In Lit & Cul

37185 • Fall 2013
Meets W 500pm-600pm HRH 2.112
(also listed as ITL 180P)

Required of all first-year graduate students in the Department of French and Italian.  

ITL 180P • Intro To Studies In Lit & Cul

37465 • Fall 2013
Meets W 500pm-600pm HRH 2.112
(also listed as FR 180P)

Required of all first-year graduate students in the Department of French and Italian.

FR 326L • Intro Fr Lit II: Fr Rev-Pres

36850 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm HRH 2.112

FLAGS:   GC

FR 180P • Intro To Studies In Lit & Cul

36840 • Fall 2012
Meets W 500pm-600pm HRH 2.112

Required of all first-year graduate students in the Department of French and Italian.  

ITL 180P • Intro To Studies In Lit & Cul

37110 • Fall 2012
Meets W 500pm-600pm HRH 2.112

Required of all first-year graduate students in the Department of French and Italian.

FR 326L • Intro Fr Lit II: Fr Rev-Pres

36705 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.208

FLAGS:   GC

FR 326L • Intro Fr Lit II: Fr Rev-Pres

36895 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 1.126

FLAGS:   GC

External Grants


Fellowships

 

  • 2007-8  Loeb Classical Library Foundation Fellowship (year); Renaissance Society of America Senior Scholar Research Grant for research in Paris (one month).
  • 2002-3  Sabbatical Fellowship, American Philosophical Society.
  • 2001 Marandon Fellowship, Society of American Professors of French, 6 mos.
  • 1996-97 Fulbright-Hays senior research fellowship (Paris, France), 6 mos.

 

Publications


Bizer, M. (2011)Homer and the Politics of Authority in Renaissance France. New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press. 272pp. Oxford Scholarship Online. Oxford University Press. January 2012.

http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/ClassicalStudies/?view=usa&ci=9780199731565

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199731565.001.0001

Bizer, M. (2010). "From Lyric to Epic and Back: Joachim Du Bellay's Epic Regrets." Modern Language Quarterly 71.2. 107-127.

Bizer, M. (2008). “Homer, La Boétie, Montaigne, and the Question of Sovereignty.” In Zahi Zalloua and Reinier Leushuis (Eds.), “Esprit généreux, esprit pantagruélicque”: Essays by His Students In Honor of François Rigolot. Geneva: Droz, 259-277.

Bizer, M. (2006). “Men are from Mars: Jean de Sponde’s Homeric Heroes and Vision of Just French Leaders.” In Philip Ford and Paul White (Eds.), Masculinities in Sixteenth-Century France. Cambridge: Cambridge French Colloquia, 167-179.

Bizer, M. (2006). “Garnier’s La Troade between Homeric Fiction and French History: the Question of Moral Authority.” Romance Notes 46.3 (2006). 331-39.

Bizer, M. (2004, September). What’s in a Name? Biography vs. Wordplay in Du Bellay’s Regrets. Early Modern France, 9, 99-109.

Bizer, M. (2002). ‘Qui a païs n'a que faire de patrie’: Joachim Du Bellay’s Resistance to a French Identity. Romanic Review 91.4, 375-395.

Bizer, M. (2002). A Source of Du Bellay’s Most Famous Sonnet: ‘Heureux qui comme Ulysse’. Romance Notes, 42.3, 371-375.

Bizer, M. (2001). Les Lettres Romaines de Du Bellay: Les Regrets et la Tradition Epistolaire. Montreal: University of Montreal Press. 302pp.

Bizer, M. (1999). “Letters from Home: The Epistolary Aspects of Joachim Du Bellay’s Regrets.” Renaissance Quarterly 52.1, 140-79.

Bizer, M. (1996). “The Reflection of the Other in One’s Own Mirror: The Idea of the Portrait in Renaissance imitatio.”Romance Notes 36.2, 191-9.

Bizer, M. (1995). “Ronsard the poet, Belleau the Translator: The Difficulties of Writing in the Laureate’s Shadow”. In K. Lloyd-Jones & J. Beer (Eds.), Humanist Translators and their Craft. Kalamazoo: Western Michigan University, 175-226.

Bizer, M. (1995). La Poésie au Miroir: Imitation et Conscience de Soi dans la Poésie Latine de la Pléiade. Paris: Honoré Champion. 227pp.

Bizer, M. (1995). “Salammbô, Polybe et la rhétorique de la violence.” Revue d’Histoire Littéraire de la France 6, 974-88.

Bizer, M. (1994). “The Genealogy of Poetry According to Ronsard and Julius Cesar Scaliger.” Humanistica Lovaniensia 43, 304-318.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links



  • Department of French and Italian

    University of Texas at Austin
    201 W 21st Street STOP B7600
    HRH 2.114A
    Austin, TX 78712-1800
    512-471-5531