History Department
History Department

HIS 301G • Modern World

38385 • Matysik, Tracie M.
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm CLA 0.128
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This course will concentrate on the themes and methodologies necessary to thinking about the history of the planet, roughly 1500-present.  It will not provide a synthetic, chronological overview of everything that has happened on this planet in the last 500 years.  Rather, it will concentrate on the movements of technology, ideas, and persons that have made possible something like a globalized, interconnected – albeit differentiated – world.  Attention will be given to the interplay between universalizing forces and local specificities, to shifting conceptions of the universal and of difference, and to instabilities of boundaries and borders – geographical, political, and conceptual – that result from and regulate the tensions between broadly planetary and locally differentiated developments.  In the course we will devote as much time to the concepts and methodologies of global history as we will to the content of empirical historical developments.

Texts:

Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Brief Global History, Vol. 2 (Boston and New York:  Bedford/St. Martin’s (2009).

Tayeb Salih, Season of Migration to the North, trans. Denys Johnson-Davies (New York: New York Review Books, 1969).

Jonathan Spence, The Question of Hu (New York: Vintage, 1989).

Grading:

Midterm: 25%

Midterm: 30%

Final Exam: 30%

Weekly Quizzes and Participation: 15%


HIS 306N • Revltn/Decoloniztn N Africa

38390 • Brower, Benjamin Claude
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 301
(also listed as MES 310)
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This class addresses the history of anti-colonial struggles in North Africa and the victory over European colonial powers.  These struggles gained momentum after World War II, leading to the independence of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya in the 1950s and 60s.  Coursework will seek to explain the various processes by which independence was achieved, looking at local circumstances as well as the larger regional (Africa, Middle East, and Europe) and global (Cold War, Third World, oil resources) contexts.  The course will also present the complex nature of the armed struggle: wars against the colonial powers unleashed a fury of conflicts, or wars within wars, some of which were not immediately tied to the colonial/anti-colonial struggle. Our study will conclude by highlighting the many successes of these revolutions as well as pointing to their problematic legacies, which serve as the backdrop to today’s revolutions and civil wars in the region.  Students will examine all these questions through sources that will include films, photographs, political propaganda texts, and memoires.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Students will learn the skills of critical analysis and interpretation, along with the empirical material associated with the time period itself, including primary sources. Skills will focus on the ability to grasp the complexity of historical debates and rethink received understandings and concepts in light of new evidence.  Coursework and evaluations will focus on students’ ability to marshal evidence to articulate coherent and sustained arguments in writing and verbally.  There are no pre-requisites beyond those generally associated with a course of this level.

 

Texts:

REQUIRED TEXTS: 

Hamou Amirouche, Memoirs of a Mujahid, Algeria’s Struggle for Freedom, 1945-1962

Martin Evans, Algeria, France’s Undeclared War

Franz Fanon, A Dying Colonialism

Albert Memmi, The Colonizer and the Colonized       

 

 

Grading:

ASSIGNMENTS:

•           Exams: There will be two exams.  Both will consist of analytical ID’s and essays.  A list of potential ID’s and questions will be available beforehand to help prepare for the exams. You will be expected to respond with material from the readings and lectures.

•           Writing Assignment: You will prepare a short essay based on a series of primary sources.

 

Grades:

Midterm                     25%               

Final Exam                25%

Essay                         25%

Participation                         25%


HIS 306N • History Of Human Sexuality

38395 • Levine, Philippa
Meets MW 300pm-430pm GAR 0.102
(also listed as WGS 301)
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History of Human Sexuality - Philippa Levine

The course will approach the history of sexuality from four angles: sexual behaviors (including but not limited to sexual orientation, prostitution, rape, use of pornography); sexual consequences (including but not limited to STDs, conception, birth control, abortion); sexual regulation (including but not limited to laws on abortion , obscenity, age of consent, and  race-mixing; role of religion; role of the state) and sexual science (including but not limited to gender assignment and intersex; circumcision; sexology).

 

 

Texts:

Course texts will include Robert Buffington, Eithne Luibhéid and Donna Guy, A Global History of Sexuality (Wiley, 2014) and Robert A. Nye, Sexuality (Oxford, 1999).

 

 

Grading:

Assessment will be based on a series of assignments completed at regular intervals throughout the course, culminating in a research paper, the topic of which will be chosen in consultation with the instructor and TAs.  Students will be asked to write a short paragraph weekly (ungraded) on the topics to be covered, will sit one (graded) in-class mid-term exam, and keep a journal which will detail their progress on the research paper due at the end of the semester.  The journal will be submitted for grading every three weeks, which will allow the instructor and TAs to intervene early where necessary if a student is not meeting the standards of the course.


HIS 306N • Intro M East: Adj/Chg Mod Tm

38400 • Di-Capua, Yoav
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 0.102
(also listed as GOV 314, MES 301L)
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Introduction to the Middle East:  Adjustment and Change in Modern Times

This is an introductory class to the history of the Middle East in the 20th century. The main question for consideration is which forces and what sort of developments transformed this region from a relatively peaceful region to a radicalized environment and a source for opposition against the “West.” By exploring critical political, social, intellectual and economic themes such as colonialism, Arab nationalism, secular modernism, the impact of Zionism and military conflict, the rise of political Islam, the status of women and the oil revolution, we would identify the main internal and external forces, as well as the critical processes, that shaped the region during the last century.

 

 

Texts:

·        James Gelvin, The Modern Middle East; A History (Oxford: Oxford 

                 University Press, 2004).

·        James Gelvin, The Israel-Palestine Conflict : One Hundred Years of War 

                  (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005).


HIS 306N • Introduction To Islam

38401-38404 • Azam, Hina
Meets W 200pm-400pm
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HIS 306N • Jewish Civ: 1492 To Present

38405 • Bodian, Miriam
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as EUS 306, J S 304N, R S 313N)
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This is the second half of a two-semester survey of Jewish civilization, and deals with the period from the Expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492 to the present. It will give students a grasp of major demographic shifts, the impact of the Reformation, the emergence of new attitudes to Jews, the breakdown of traditional authority and the trend toward secularization. It will deal with the following transformative events: the rise of eastern European Jewry, the spread of kabbalah (a form of mysticism), the entry of Jews into a capitalist economy, Hassidism, Jewish Enlightenment (Haskalah), emancipation, modern antisemitism, Zionism, Jews in the Muslim world, the rise American Jewry, the Holocaust, the establishment of the State of Israel, and the Arab-Israeli conflict. The thematic core of the course will be the concepts of exile and return – their various meanings and interpretations as new historical contexts took shape.

 

Texts:

Eli Barnavi, A Historical Atlas of the Jewish People: From the Time of the Patriarchs to the Present. 

Paul Mendes-Flohr and Jehuda Reinharz, eds., The Jew in the Modern World: A Documentary History.


 

Grading:

First mid-term (25%), second mid-term (25%), final exam (50%).

 


HIS 309K • Western Civ In Medieval Times

38410 • Kaufman, Cheryl
Meets MW 400pm-530pm WEL 2.312
(also listed as AHC 310)
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This course offers an introductory survey of Western European history, from about 300 to 1500 C.E. Although textual sources are central to the study of history, we will also focus on visual and material sources to discuss the cultural, social, political, economic, and intellectual history of the Middle Ages, with a focus on the formation of identity. Classes will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, and collaborative assignments.

Objectives:

Learn to analyze and articulate meaning from primary sources created in the Middle Ages - both texts and material culture. Learn to read critically and gain a broad understanding of European history. Gain the ability to describe the major historical trends in the history of Western Civilization during the Middle Ages. Become more aware of material culture and the significance of place/space both in the medieval and modern world. Develop a deeper understanding of cultures that may be different from our own. (Note that this course has a Global Cultures flag)

Texts:

Rosenwein, Barbara, A Short History of the Middle Ages (2009, single volume) Augustine, Confessions (translated by F.J. Sheed)

Einhard and Notker the Stammerer, Two Lives of Charlemagne (Penguin Classics, translated by Lewis Thorpe)

The Letters of Abelard and Heloise (translated by Betty Radice)

Additional required readings will be made available electronically on Canvas. (If you need help with Canvas, you can find on-line tutorials and assistance at: http://canvas.utexas.edu/)

 

 

Grading:

Map quiz: 5%

Quizzes (including pop quizzes): 15%

Mid-semester tests: 30% (2 @ 15% each)

Final exam (cumulative): 30%

Attendance: 10%

Class Participation: 10%


HIS 309L • Western Civ In Modern Times

38415 • Vaughn, James M.
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm WEL 2.308
(also listed as CTI 310)
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This lecture course surveys the history of Europe and its overseas expansion from the late Middle Ages to the present.  The central theme of this survey is the origins and evolution of modernity, including the development of the centralized state and its democratization, the secularization of society, the disenchantment of nature, and the emergence and transformation of global capitalism.  Class lectures are supplemented by readings from the textbook and from primary sources.

Text for the course:

Judith Coffin, Robert Stacey, Joshua Cole, and Carol Symes, Western Civilizations: Their History and Their Culture (course textbook)

Grading policy:

Attendance and Participation: 10%

Mid-Term Essay Exam 1: 25%

Mid-Term Essay Exam 2: 25%

Final Essay Exam: 40%


HIS 310 • Introduction To Modern Africa

38420 • Falola, Toyin
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 3.134
(also listed as AFR 310K, WGS 301)
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Introduction to modern Africa, with focus on colonial and postcolonial development in political organization, economics, sociolinguistics, and literature.


HIS 310N • Film/Hist Latin Amer: Mod

38425 • Twinam, Ann
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 116
(also listed as LAS 310)
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Film History in Latin America: Modern

This course introduces students to selected topics in Latin American history and culture through film, readings, documentaries, class discussion and lectures.  One goal is to explore significant influences that have molded Latin American history from the conquest through the early twentieth century.  Another is for students to develop their analytical capabilities to utilize both visual and written materials as they engage in discussion, write analytical essays, and prepare individual projects. Topics include but are not limited to: The Mexican Revolution; Borders between Central America, Mexico, The US; The Argentine Dirty War, The Cuban Revolution.

 

Texts:

Donald Stevens, Based on a True Story: Latin American History at the Movies, Scholarly Resources, 1998.

 Other readings will be posted on Blackboard.

 

Grading:

Essays            6/9  (67%)

Outlines          1/9  (11%)

Discussion      2/9  (22%)


HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In US

38430 • Zamora, Emilio
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 208
(also listed as MAS 316)
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The reading and lecture course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848, with an emphasis on the period between 1900 and the present.  The primary purpose of the course is to address time and place specific variations in the incorporation of the Mexican community as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  One of my central concerns is to explain two inter-related historical trends in this incorporation, steady upward mobility and unrelenting social marginalization.  I emphasize work experiences, race thinking, social relations, trans-border relations, social causes and larger themes in U.S. history such as wars, sectional differences, industrialization, reform, labor and civil rights struggles, and the development of a modern urbanized society. Also, I incorporate relevant aspects of the history of Latinos, African Americans, and Mexico.

 

Texts:

Manuel G. Gonzales, Mexicanos, A History of Mexicans in the US (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999).

Angela Valenzuela, “The Drought of Understanding and the Hummingbird Spirit,” Unpublished essay in my possession.

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

Emilio Zamora, “Guide for Writing Family History Research Paper.

 

Grading:

Mid-term examination (25%),

Final examination (25%),

Research paper (30%),

Two chapter reports (10%)

Film report (10%).


HIS 315G • Intro To American Studies

38435 • Cordova, Cary
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.306
(also listed as AMS 310)
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Description

This class introduces students to the field of American Studies. The guiding objective of the class is to use interdisciplinary lenses – such as music, dance, material culture, and urban studies – to develop a more complex understanding of American culture. In this class, we will investigate select aspects of American culture using various methodological approaches. The course outline follows a semi-linear pattern in history, but is hardly comprehensive. We will look broadly at the tensions between individual identity formation and the many social constructions that operate in American culture. The class is loosely tied around the connection, or disconnection, of individuals with mass culture (music, in particular, but also cars, corporations, television, and even fashion).

 

This class is organized into three sections, starting with swing culture in the 1930s and 40s, shifting to the dynamics of popular music and culture from the 1950s to the 1980s (think girl groups, salsa, disco, and rap), and finally, looking at the politics of consumerism and globalization in our everyday lives. We will use these three modules to think critically about the relationship between the past and present, to examine the relationship between individual identity formation and the larger cultural zeitgeist, and to develop an understanding of how social inequalities, particularly guised through race, class, gender, and sexuality, infiltrate all areas of American life.

 

While mass culture often provides a context for making sense of the world, it also simplifies and negates a variety of more complex issues. Thus, if there is an overriding theme to the class, it is the concept of visibility versus invisibility. Who becomes the representative American? What is un-American? Who feels displaced, or invisible? How do ideologies of race, class, gender, and sexuality penetrate popular culture? And how have individuals responded? The goals of the course are to develop a more nuanced understanding of American culture and American Studies, to build critical thinking skills, and to generate new paradigms for looking at the world.    

 

Requirements

Midterm Exam:                     25%

Final Exam:                             30%

Reading Response Papers:          10%

Discography:                         20%

Attendance and Participation:      15%


HIS 315G • Intro To American Studies

38440 • Underwood, Elissa
Meets MW 300pm-430pm MEZ 1.306
(also listed as AMS 310)
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This course will introduce students to key themes and methodological approaches involved in the interdisciplinary and historical analysis of American culture.  In this particular section of AMS 310, we will use carceral spaces and incarceration to frame our interrogation and understanding of U.S. cultural history.  By studying a wide range of texts, including memoirs, photographs, legal decisions, and films, we will work to illuminate the causes and impacts of imprisonment in the U.S., and more specifically mass/hyper-imprisonment of low-income communities of color.  Our examination of historical and contemporary primary source materials will raise questions pertaining to race, ethnicity, citizenship, class, gender, sexuality, age, disability, and other systems and categories of marginalization as we develop a discourse around the purposes of and potential alternatives to one of America's oldest and strongest institutions -- the prison.Exam 1 (25%)Midterm (35%)Final (40%)


HIS 315G • Intro To American Studies

38443 • Vaught, Jeannette
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GAR 0.102
(also listed as AMS 310)
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Introduction to American Studies: Cyborg Americans

 

This course introduces students to the field of American studies.  The guiding objective of this course is to use various interdisciplinary lenses – such as forms of material culture, technology, and performance – to investigate the United States as a contested set of identities and representations. 

 

In this particular section of AMS 310, we’re going to look at the human-technology interface – the cyborg! – in American culture.  The course emphasizes these concurrent and parallel histories of Americans by focusing on the adoption of and responses to new technologies from the late 19th century to the present.  The semester will be organized into four units, starting with the germ revolution in the 1880s and 1890s, then moving through the electrification of the nation from 1900 to 1940, shifting into the Cold War cultural relationships between nuclear particle physics and the boom in consumer domestic products, and finally investigating the turn to computing.  We end by considering the global dimensions of the internet age. 

 

In each of these units, we will use these examples to think critically about the relationship between the past and the present, to examine how individual identity formation relates to the larger cultural zeitgeist, and to understand more fully how social inequalities, particularly in the forms of race, class, gender, and sexuality, infiltrate all areas of American life.  By the end of the course, students will develop a more nuanced understanding of American culture and American studies, build critical thinking skills, and become cognizant of the multiple histories at play at any given period. 

 

Possible course texts:

Louis Menand, The Metaphysical Club

Carolyn De La Peña, The Body Electric

Lizabeth Cohen, The Consumer’s Republic

Lisa Nakamura, Cybertypes

 

Assignments:

Midterm: 30%

Final: 30%

Digital History project: 25%

Attendance and Participation: 15%


HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

38445 • Ernst, Christopher
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CAL 100
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This course explores the most vital—and occasionally controversial—aspects of the social, cultural and political developments in the European colonization of North America and the emergence of the United States.  Surveying nearly 400 years, it ranges from the early period of European exploration to the American Civil War.  Lectures will provide a detailed examination of such topics as race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration, religion, regional tension, dominance and resistance.  We will explore the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government and the expansion of American territory. Major themes will include the cultural collision of the contact period, the development of slavery, religious and intellectual trends, the American Revolution, the divergence of the northern and southern United States, the dominance of market capitalism and the rise of the American working class, continuous immigration, geographic and economic expansion and the sectional divisions preceding the Civil War.

 

Throughout the course, we will read cutting-edge scholarship and analyze compelling primary sources.  Students will become adept at interpreting images, deconstructing texts and evaluating historical evidence.

 

Texts:

Of the People: A History of the United States,Volume 1: To 1877, Second Edition, by James Oakes, et al.

 

Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, vol. 1, To 1877, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

 

The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass

 

Grading:

Attendance and class participation                                                                                 20%

Midterm                                                                                                                     20%

Essay (2000 words)                                                                                                            30%

Final examination                                                                                                    30%

 


HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

38450 • Ernst, Christopher
Meets MWF 900am-1000am CAL 100
show description

This course explores the most vital—and occasionally controversial—aspects of the social, cultural and political developments in the European colonization of North America and the emergence of the United States.  Surveying nearly 400 years, it ranges from the early period of European exploration to the American Civil War.  Lectures will provide a detailed examination of such topics as race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration, religion, regional tension, dominance and resistance.  We will explore the emergence of an American identity, the evolution of American self-government and the expansion of American territory. Major themes will include the cultural collision of the contact period, the development of slavery, religious and intellectual trends, the American Revolution, the divergence of the northern and southern United States, the dominance of market capitalism and the rise of the American working class, continuous immigration, geographic and economic expansion and the sectional divisions preceding the Civil War.

 

Throughout the course, we will read cutting-edge scholarship and analyze compelling primary sources.  Students will become adept at interpreting images, deconstructing texts and evaluating historical evidence.

 

Texts:

Of the People: A History of the United States,Volume 1: To 1877, Second Edition, by James Oakes, et al.

 

Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, vol. 1, To 1877, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

 

The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass

 

Grading:

Attendance and class participation                                                                                 20%

Midterm                                                                                                                     20%

Essay (2000 words)                                                                                                            30%

Final examination                                                                                                    30%

 


HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

38455 • Seaholm, Megan
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 1.308
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Lectures, readings, videos, maps and other graphics are used to provide students with a survey of US history from before the European encounter through the Civil War. Students will study significant aspects of the nation’s political, economic, and cultural history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history. You begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequences.

Moving from what happened to why or how, and, then, to so what students will sharpen their skills in critical thinking. Both exams will include essay questions to encourage students in their written communication skills. Along the way, students will consider some of the ethical dilemmas confronted by Americans who lived long ago.

Students will examine issues of personal responsibility and social responsibility as they learn about how previous generations understood these responsibilities. For example, many Americans in the late 18th century and in the first decades after the creation of the United States, emphasized “civic virtue” as essential if republican (representative) government was to survive.

 

Texts:

Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty, brief 3rd edition, volume 1.

Eric Foner, ed., Voices of Freedom, 3rd edition, volume 1

Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin or Life Among the Lowly

 

Grading:

1st Midterm Exam:  (30% of course grade)

2nd Midterm Exam: (30% of course grade)

1 in class multiple choice test, (10% course grade),

3rd Exam: (30% of course grade)


HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

38460 • Seaholm, Megan
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 1.308
show description

Lectures, readings, videos, maps and other graphics are used to provide students with a survey of US history from before the European encounter through the Civil War. Students will study significant aspects of the nation’s political, economic, and cultural history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history. You begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequences.

Moving from what happened to why or how, and, then, to so what students will sharpen their skills in critical thinking. Both exams will include essay questions to encourage students in their written communication skills. Along the way, students will consider some of the ethical dilemmas confronted by Americans who lived long ago.

Students will examine issues of personal responsibility and social responsibility as they learn about how previous generations understood these responsibilities. For example, many Americans in the late 18th century and in the first decades after the creation of the United States, emphasized “civic virtue” as essential if republican (representative) government was to survive.

 

Texts:

Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty, brief 3rd edition, volume 1.

Eric Foner, ed., Voices of Freedom, 3rd edition, volume 1

Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin or Life Among the Lowly

 

Grading:

1st Midterm Exam:  (30% of course grade)

2nd Midterm Exam: (30% of course grade)

1 in class multiple choice test, (10% course grade),

3rd Exam: (30% of course grade)


HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

38465 • Miller, Aragorn Storm
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm JGB 2.216
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In just over a century the United States transformed from a nation scarred by civil war to perhaps the most powerful, prosperous, yet conflicted polity in human history.  How did this happen?  This course examines the dominant discourses, crises, and questions associated with the growth of the United States as a political and socioeconomic world power. We begin with a discussion of the ways in which the nation attempted to recover from the Civil War in the context of renewed territorial expansion, accelerating industrialization, and diversifying immigration.  From there we examine the rise of the United States to global prominence and the emergence of new strains of domestic ambivalence regarding macroeconomic prosperity, social discord, and geopolitical influence.  We conclude with a consideration of the contested meanings of freedom, prosperity, and national identity, as the nation grappled with the Cold War and the rapidly evolving socioeconomic realities of the late 20th and turn of the 21st century world.

 

The goal of this course is to develop your ability to master and apply content and facts, in order to interrogate competing interpretive positions and make critical judgments about history.  This course also aims to teach you critical thinking skills that cross over to disciplines other than History.  In other words, if you apply yourself in this course you will become a more skillful student and a more informed citizen. 

This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board:  communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

 

Texts:

James Henretta, et. al., America:  A Concise History, Volume Two:  Since 1865, 6th edition (2014)

Selected Primary Source Documents as Provided by Instructor (via URLs pasted into the syllabus and PDFs posted to our Canvas page 

 

Grading:

Your final grade will be based on an  (30%), a 5-page (1250 word) paper on an assigned topic (30%), and a final essay exam (40%). I do not tolerate late papers without a very good reason.  Papers are docked one full grade every day they are late.


HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

38470 • Miller, Aragorn Storm
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm JGB 2.216
show description

In just over a century the United States transformed from a nation scarred by civil war to perhaps the most powerful, prosperous, yet conflicted polity in human history.  How did this happen?  This course examines the dominant discourses, crises, and questions associated with the growth of the United States as a political and socioeconomic world power. We begin with a discussion of the ways in which the nation attempted to recover from the Civil War in the context of renewed territorial expansion, accelerating industrialization, and diversifying immigration.  From there we examine the rise of the United States to global prominence and the emergence of new strains of domestic ambivalence regarding macroeconomic prosperity, social discord, and geopolitical influence.  We conclude with a consideration of the contested meanings of freedom, prosperity, and national identity, as the nation grappled with the Cold War and the rapidly evolving socioeconomic realities of the late 20th and turn of the 21st century world.

 

The goal of this course is to develop your ability to master and apply content and facts, in order to interrogate competing interpretive positions and make critical judgments about history.  This course also aims to teach you critical thinking skills that cross over to disciplines other than History.  In other words, if you apply yourself in this course you will become a more skillful student and a more informed citizen. 

This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board:  communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

 

Texts:

James Henretta, et. al., America:  A Concise History, Volume Two:  Since 1865, 6th edition (2014)

Selected Primary Source Documents as Provided by Instructor (via URLs pasted into the syllabus and PDFs posted to our Canvas page 

 

Grading:

Your final grade will be based on an  (30%), a 5-page (1250 word) paper on an assigned topic (30%), and a final essay exam (40%). I do not tolerate late papers without a very good reason.  Papers are docked one full grade every day they are late.


HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

38475 • Suri, Jeremi
Meets TTH 800am-930am
show description

This online interactive course is designed to provide students with a grounding in some of the mostcontroversial, enduring, and relevant topics in the history of the United States, broadly defined.Students will read a wide range of monographs and primary source materials. Lectures anddiscussions will encourage students to compare and contrast various points of view, and interrogatebroad historical transformations since the Civil War. The course will emphasize intensive reading,analytical writing, and critical thinking. The instructor and teaching assistants will, at all times,encourage students to articulate different points of view. Our central purpose is to stimulateinformed, thoughtful, and intelligent perspectives on the American experience. This includes closeattention to politics, society, culture, economy, diplomacy, and military affairs. It also includes aninternational and transnational understanding of how Americans have interacted historically withthose defined as non-Americans. Instead of comprehensiveness and textbook detail, this will be acourse about big ideas, big transformations, and big debates – that continue into the twenty-firstcentury. We will not strive for consensus or agreement in this course; we will nurture learneddiscussion and collective engagement with the complexities of our society’s history.

Course meets online during scheduled class times and includes a live-streaming video component. Students are encouraged to visit http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/online/courses/ to test their computer and network connection and learn about the course structure.

Students will be required to attend several sessions in person in the on-campus studio.

Texts:

Brinkley, Alan. Franklin Delano Roosevelt (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).

Foner, Eric. Voices of Freedom: A Documentary History, Volume 2, Fourth Edition

(New York: W.W. Norton, 2014).

Hahn, Steven. A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South

from Slavery to the Great Migration (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University

Press, 2005).

Leffler, Melvyn P. The Specter of Communism: The United States and the Origins of the Cold War, 1917-1953 (New York: Hill and Wang, 1994).

McGerr, Michael. A Fierce Discontent: The Rise and Fall of the Progressive Movement in America, 1870-1920 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2005).

McPherson, James M. Abraham Lincoln and the Second American Revolution (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992).

Self, Robert O. All in the Family: The Realignment of American Democracy since the 1960s (New York: Hill and Wang, 2012).

Suri, Jeremi. Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Détente (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2005).

Grading:

Weekly Response Essays: 20%

Document Analysis: 20%

Examination #1: 20%

Examination #2: 30%

Lecture Attendance: 10%


HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

38480 • Brands, Henry W.
Meets MW 300pm-430pm BUR 106
show description

Subject and themes

The course covers American history from the end of the Civil War to the present. The basic themes are (1) the struggle to define the boundary between the public sector and the private sector in American life, or between democracy and capitalism; and (2) the striking fact that a nation that professes to love peace has so often gone to war.

 

Course objectives

The course has two primary objectives: (1) to make students more familiar with the major events and developments of American history since the Civil War, and (2) to help students learn to think like historians: that is, to imagine how the world looked to people in the past, to try to understand why they did what they did, to formulate historical explanations and test them using historical evidence.

 

Texts:

Required materials

- Revel online text and quizzes for "The United States since 1865 - HIS 315L (38445)." The access code can be purchased athttps://console.pearson.com/enrollment/ejn4q2

 (Links to an external site.)

 or at the UT Co-op.

- The Murder of Jim Fisk for the Love of Josie Mansfield, paperback book. At UT Co-op.

- Four movies, to be assigned and placed on reserve.

 

Grading:

Assignments

 

Chapter quizzes

These online quizzes are in the Revel text. The deadline for each chapter is Friday at 6 pm. Extensions will be granted only for sudden documented illness or grave family emergency. Computer and network problems are not acceptable excuses. It is the responsibility of students to monitor their grades for the quizzes. The exams will add up to 40 percent of the semester grade.

 

Essays

Two, on topics to be assigned. 20 percent total.

 

Movie responses

Two, from prompts to be given. 15 percent total.

 

Book report

On The Murder of Jim Fisk for the Love of Josie Mansfield. 15 percent total.

 

Attendance

10 percent.


HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

38483 • Miller, Aragorn Storm
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 


HIS 317L • The Sixties: Protest/Soc Pltcs

38487 • Parrott, R. Joseph
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GAR 0.132
show description

Ask most Americans to summarize the 1960s in one word and you are likely to get a familiar set of responses: hippies, Woodstock, and Vietnam. None of these keywords would be wrong, but the decade was more complex. Ideological debates and the trauma of war challenged entrenched American traditions, creating opportunities for many new forms of individual and political expression. A variety of movements worked together and independently during this period to alter fundamental characteristics of the nation. As a result, many of the cherished ideas of the immediate postwar era gave way to more skeptical, diverse, and in some ways democratic visions of the United States, paving the way for Ronald Reagan, grassroots campaigning, and the age of identity politics. 

In this class, we will explore a sampling of these social debates and movements, which will celebrate the full diversity that typified this period of questioning and transition. Themes will include civil rights, anti-war protest, government cynicism, environmentalism, ethnic nationalism, women’s rights, and national morality. Together, we will seek to identify what common elements of protest, skepticism, hope, experimentation, internationalism, and reform allow historians to define events as belonging to the single conceptual and chronological decade of the 1960s.

 

Texts:

Lisa McGirr, Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right (Princeton, 2002)

Doug Rossinow, The Politics of Authenticity: Liberalism, Christianity, and the New Left in America (Columbia, 1998)

Brian Ward, ed. 1960s: A Documentary Reader (Blackwell-Wiley, 2009)

Additional short articles and multimedia will be posted on Canvas


HIS 317L • Urban Econ Development-Rsa

38490 • Moore, Leonard N.
Meets
show description

This course will look at the history of urban economic development within the United States and South Africa, with a special focus on the growth, development, and neglect of low-income racially homogenous communities. Both countries share a racial past and both countries are still trying to find ways to bring its low-income residents into the economic mainstream. Within the United States inner-city communities are now becoming prime business locations because of its close access to downtown and the city’s financial and business markets. Further, emerging entrepreneurs are not only choosing to locate their firms in the ‘hood but they are also using local residents who were previously unemployed or underemployed. The goal of these efforts is to create jobs and income for inner-city residents, instead of relying upon charity and goodwill. A similar market-led approach is taking place in South Africa as well as entrepreneurs and developers are finding ways to bring economic development efforts to the countries notorious townships. 

 

While these efforts have only recently received widespread media attention, this course will show that the drive for vibrant communities is nothing new. Within the townships of South Africa there has been a sustained drive for economically competitive communities and likewise within inner-city America. This course will look at these efforts within the historical context of apartheid and the post colonial era within South Africa; and in the historical context of post-war and post-civil rights America.

 

Texts:

Black Liberation: A Comparative History of Black Ideologies in the U.S. and South Africa, Fredrickson

After Mandela: The Struggle for Freedom in Post-Apartheid South Africa, Foster

American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland, Self

Khayelitsha: uMlungu in a Township, Otter

The Business of Black Power: Community Development, Capitalism, and Corporate Responsibility in Postwar America, Hill and Rabig

The New Urban Renewal: The Economic Transformation of Harlem and Bronzeville, Hyra

 

Grading:

Grades will be based upon the following:

•           Two critical book reviews

•           Weekly blogging

•           Two exams

•           Oral History Project

•           A fifteen page historical paper that compares and contrasts inner-city economic development efforts in the United States with similar efforts in Khayelitsha. Your oral history project should form the basis for the South African portion of the paper.

•           Internship

•           Class participation

 

Grade Breakdown

•           Two critical book reviews (20%)

•           Weekly Blogging (10%)

•           Internship (10%)

•           Class Participation (10%)

•           Mid-Term exam (20%)

•           Oral history Project and Final Paper (30%)


HIS 317L • Era Of American Revolution

38495 • Olwell, Robert A.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 0.102
show description

Through a mixture of lectures and discussion (and a few film clips), this course will examine the causes, course, and consequences of the American Revolution from 1760 to 1800. Assignments will consist of four in-class exams, plus a brief analytical paper based on reading primary sources.

Books that may be assigned:

Robert Gross, The Minutemen and their World

Lawrence Babits, A Devil of a Whipping

Rhys Isaac, The Transformation of Virginia

Woody Holton, Forced Founders

Grading:

Attendance/Participation 10%Exams 65%Research paper 25%


HIS 317L • Intro To Asian American Hist

38500 • Hsu, Madeline Y.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as AAS 312)
show description

This class introduces key themes in Asian American history by exploring the crucial roles Asian have played in framing American ideas and institutions regarding citizenship, national belonging, border control, and multiracial democracy.  Seen as inassimilable aliens and essentially foreign, Asians were the first targets of legal immigration restrictions and enforcement.  Asian Americans persevered in continuing migration to establish communities and forge ethnic identities and cultures by claiming the promise  of equality in America.  We will consider variations on Asian American history and culture through memoirs, legal documents, cultural productions, media representations, and reinterpretations of mainstream tropes of American identity.

 

Texts:

Erika Lee, The Making of Asian America: A History (Simon and Schuster, 2015)

Gary Okihiro, Margins and Mainstreams (UW Press, 1994)

Eric Liu, The Accidental Asian (Vintage, 1999)


HIS 317L • US In 17th-C Atlantic World

38505 • Kamil, Neil D.
Meets MWF 900am-1000am UTC 3.122
show description

With global expansion from the spread of warfare, commerce and credit, exploration, New World Colonization, technological innovation, and religious reformation and counter-reformation, the seventeenth century saw the spread of knowledge and experience of the world through human interaction in the form of conflict, economic exchange, and cultural creativity. Extensions of human geography and puzzling encounters with strange people, gods, material culture, and flora and fauna in exotic places, also formed the basis of a remarkable convergence of science, art and culture between east and west during this period. The purpose of this lecture course is to begin to map just a few of the major patterns in this enormous global process as they touch upon the various regions of Spanish, British, and French North America during the earliest period of settlement.

Texts:

Daniel K. Richter, Facing East from Indian Country (Electronic Resource on UTCAT); Franklin W. Knight, ed., Andrew Hurley translator, Bartolome de las Casas, An Account, Much Abbreviated , of the Destruction of the Indies;   David Cressy, Coming Over (pdf available on Canvas)

Grading:

Midterm and Final Essay Examinations, one 2-page book review, one quiz.  Grading percentages are not written in stone but may be calculated roughly as follows:  midterm (30%), final (40%), book review (20%), and quiz (10%). Please note:  while there are no explicit percentages for class participation listed in this framework, enthusiastic engagement with the readings during discussions is expected and will be rewarded in the final grade.  As a result, those of you who do not participate will suffer by comparison.


HIS 317L • Intro To Amer Indian History

38510 • Bsumek, Erika M.
Meets MW 300pm-430pm JGB 2.324
show description

This survey course will examine the history of Native American societies in North America from the earliest records to the present. We will explore the diverse ways in which American Indian societies were structured, the different ways that indigenous peoples have responded to colonization and the complex history of European/Indian relations. Attention will be paid to political, social, economic and cultural transformation of Native American societies over time. We will cover, among other things, the following topics: disease, religion, trade, captivity narratives, warfare, diplomacy, removal, assimilation, education, self-determination, and gaming.

Texts:

1. Colin G. Calloway, First Peoples: A Documentary Survey of the American Indian History (Boston: Bedford St. Martins) – third edition. 

2. Mary Crow Dog, Lakota Woman (New York: Harper Collins, 1990) 

3. Douglas C. Sackman, Wildmen: Ishi and Kroeber in the Wilderness of Modern America (Oxford University Press, 2010). 

4. David Edmunds, Tecumseh and the Quest for Indian Leadership (New York: Longman, 2006). 

Grading:

Assessment for this class will be based on class participation, a mid-term examination, one short paper, 2¬4 reading quizzes, in-class participation, a book review, and a final examination. 

The final grade breakdown is as follows: 

Midterm: 100 points 

Paper: 50 points 

Final exam: 100 points 

Book Review: 25 points 

Reading quizzes: 10 points each 

In class participation: 25 points.


HIS 317L • Building America

38515 • Bsumek, Erika M.
Meets MWF 900am-1000am UTC 3.102
(also listed as AMS 315)
show description

This course will look at roughly 100 years of building in American society from 1867-1980. It will focus on the ways in which politicians, architects, engineers, urban planners, construction workers, naturalists, environmentalists, novelists, filmmakers and the American populous approached the relationship between large-scale infrastructure projects and social development. This course will pay special attention to  the design of specific dams, highways, and urban areas and will place them in larger historical perspective by evaluating key locations before and after they were built or expanded. Hoover Dam, for instance, would provide a key case study in this class. Hoover Dam does more than hold water and generate electricity. It dramatically changed (and continues to change) the relationship that people had with technology, the surrounding area, and with each other. The closest urban area, Las Vegas, will also be evaluated when discussing Hoover Dam, but so too will Southern California. Special attention will also be paid to the engineering innovations that changed construction techniques used in large scale projects.

Texts:

Selected readings from the following and other sources, including primary sources.: 

To Engineer Is Human: The Role of Failure in Successful Design by Henry Petroski (Mar 31, 1992)

Snyder, Logan Thomas. “The Creation of America’s Interstate Highway System.” American History 41, no. 2 (June 2006): 32–39.

Moudry, Roberta, ed. The American Skyscraper: Cultural Histories. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

McCullough, David G. The Great Bridge: The Epic Story of the Building of the Brooklyn Bridge. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001.

Cooke, Amanda, and Avi Friedman. “Ahead of Their Time: The Sears Catalogue Prefabricated Houses.” Journal of Design History 14, no. 1 (January 1, 2001): 53–70. 

Grading:

Midterm: 100 points

Paper: 50 points

Final exam: 100 points

Book Review: 25 points

Reading quizzes: 10 points each


HIS 317L • Hist Of Religion In The US

38520 • Graber, Jennifer
Meets TTH 930am-1100am NOA 1.124
(also listed as AMS 315, R S 316U)
show description
This class explores the history of religions in the United States with a focus on changing ideas about and experiences of religious freedom. We will look at colonial-era precedents for church-state relations and accommodations for religious minorities, as well as new formulations of these arrangements in the early American republic. We will track efforts to protect religious practices by groups including Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, the Nation of Islam, and evangelical Protestants.  

 

Texts

Sehat, The Myth of American Religious Freedom

 

Grading

Short papers and unit exams

 


HIS 317N • Discovery History

38525 • Martínez, Alberto A.
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 0.120
show description

There is a mismatch between popular culture and academia. Some stories that in popular culture are celebrated as bright moments of discovery or insight are instead dismissed in academia as merely popular myths. We will analyze claims from popular books in the light of accurate historical sources. This course will introduce students to the process of making discoveries in historical research.

We will place special attention on debunking myths. Each day, as a group, we will develop interesting questions for research. Students will each freely propose topics that draw their curiosity. Our discussions will be guided by those questions. In this course, history will not be presented as knowledge that is prepackaged in books and articles to be memorized. Instead, we will use history as a tool for making discoveries about what really happened. The professor will give examples and anecdotes, from his own research, showing why he became interested in particular puzzles, why they seem fascinating, and how he managed to make new findings. Throughout the semester, the professor will also present findings from his ongoing research projects, to illustrate how historical discoveries are made.

This course is designed for first-year students, and it has no prerequisites. However, upperclassmen are also invited to enroll.

Texts:

Scott Berkun, The Myths of Innovation (Sebastopol, Canada: O’Reilly, 2007/2010).

Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success (New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2008).

John Stossel, Myths, Lies, and Downright Stupidity (New York: Hyperion, 2006).

 

Optional Books

James Burke, The Pinball Effect: How Renaissance Gardens Made the Carburetor Possible (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1996).

Alberto Martínez, Science Secrets: the Truth About Darwin’s Finches, Einstein’s Wife, and Other Myths (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011).

 

Grading:

Participation 20%, Presentation 10%, Research Project 40%, Final Exam 30%


HIS 319D • Ancient Mediterranean World

38545 • Perlman, Paula J
Meets MW 1000am-1100am CLA 0.126
(also listed as AHC 319, C C 319D)
show description

Survey of the ancient Mediterranean from ca. 3000 BC to AD 476. Focus on

the development of ideas and institutions in the Greek and Roman worlds

and on the active cultural exchange among the diverse civilizations of

the broader region that shaped Greek and Roman history and cultural

 identity.


HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

38550 • Zamora, Emilio
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 112
(also listed as URB 353)
show description

The reading and lecture course surveys change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history and Mexico-U.S. relations.  Special attention is given to Mexico-U.S. relations, politics and social relations between 1900 and 1970, as well as the home front experience of Texans during the Second World War.  The overriding theme is the incorporation of Texas into the national socio-economy from the state’s early “colonized” status to its modern position as a fully integrated part of the nation.  The course is organized around our readings.  The De la Teja/Marks/Tyler text provides a synthesis of Texas history while the Zamora text provides a closer examination of home front experiences.  The two chapters from the Campbell book will serve as a basis for an examination of the post-war period extending into 2001.

            Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the American history requirement.  Course materials, including a copy of my resume, this syllabus, lecture notes, bibliographies, and notes on interviewing techniques, will be available on Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu), UT’s course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have problems accessing the site.

 

Texts:

Randolph B. Campbell, Chapter 16, “Modern Texas, 1971-2001,” In Gone To Texas, A History of the Lone Star Stateby Randolph B. Campbell (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003): 438-67.

Jesús de la Teja, Paula Marks, and Ron Tyler, Texas, Crossroads of North America (New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004).

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII(College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

 

Grading:

Research paper (35%), 5 chapter reports (25%), and 4 film reports (40%).


HIS 321 • History Of Rome: The Empire

38555 • Riggsby, Andrew M
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 101
(also listed as AHC 325, CTI 375)
show description

This class will cover the story of the Roman empire from the death of Caesar to the fall of Rome in A.D. 476.  After working our way through the narrative of this period (about half th semester), we will examine a number of topics that cut across time.  The course will touch on politics, law, war, the economy, social classes, gender, and psychopathic emperors.


HIS 322M • History Of Modern Science

38560 • Hunt, Bruce J.
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 0.102
show description

In this course, we will survey the development of modern science from the time of Isaac Newton to the present, and will examine the growth of scientific ideas and institutions and their changing place in society.

 

Texts:

Thomas L. Hankins, Science and the Enlightenment,

Charles Darwin, Evolutionary Writings (ed. James Secord),

Bruce J. Hunt, Pursuing Power and Light: Technology and Physics from James Watt to Albert Einstein,

James D. Watson, The Double Helix (Norton Critical Ed., ed. G. S. Stent),

plus a set of additional  readings posted on Canvas.

 

Grading:

Grades will be based on three essay exams (25% each) and a short paper on a topic to be assigned (25%).


HIS 329U • Perspectives On Science & Math

38565-38570 • Raby, Megan
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAI 4.18
show description

Perspectives on Science and Math explores the intellectual, social, and cultural history of science and mathematics, focusing on the 17th century to the present. This is an upper-division history course designed for students in UTeach Natural Sciences. This course has four interlocking goals: to give you an overview of the history of science and math in order to broaden your understanding of subjects you will teach in the future; to enable you to put this broader history and context to work in science and math pedagogy; to improve your ability to research, analyze, and evaluate information; and to improve your writing and communication skills.

 

This is a Writing Flag course. It is designed to give you experience writing within an academic discipline––in this case, history. You can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback to help you revise your writing. You will also have the opportunity to read and discuss your peers’ work. For more information about the benefits and expectations of Writing Flag courses, see http://www.utexas.edu/ugs/core/flags/writing.

 

Texts:

Ede, Andrew, and Lesley B. Cormack. A History of Science in Society: From Philosophy to Utility. Second ed. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012.

Additional required primary and secondary source readings online.

Grading:

Participation (includes attendance) 10%

Reading Comprehension/Reflection Questions 25%

Research Essay: "Textbook Histories" 25%

5E Lesson Plan Project (group project, graded individually) 40%


HIS 329U • Perspectives On Science & Math

38575-38580 • Raby, Megan
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAI 4.18
show description

Perspectives on Science and Math explores the intellectual, social, and cultural history of science and mathematics, focusing on the 17th century to the present. This is an upper-division history course designed for students in UTeach Natural Sciences. This course has four interlocking goals: to give you an overview of the history of science and math in order to broaden your understanding of subjects you will teach in the future; to enable you to put this broader history and context to work in science and math pedagogy; to improve your ability to research, analyze, and evaluate information; and to improve your writing and communication skills.

 

This is a Writing Flag course. It is designed to give you experience writing within an academic discipline––in this case, history. You can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback to help you revise your writing. You will also have the opportunity to read and discuss your peers’ work. For more information about the benefits and expectations of Writing Flag courses, see http://www.utexas.edu/ugs/core/flags/writing.

 

Texts:

Ede, Andrew, and Lesley B. Cormack. A History of Science in Society: From Philosophy to Utility. Second ed. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012.

Additional required primary and secondary source readings online.

Grading:

Participation (includes attendance) 10%

Reading Comprehension/Reflection Questions 25%

Research Essay: "Textbook Histories" 25%

5E Lesson Plan Project (group project, graded individually) 40%


HIS 334L • Amer Rev/Fnd Of US, 1763-1800

38585 • Forgie, George B.
Meets MW 400pm-530pm JGB 2.202
show description

The Revolutionary transformation of America between 1763 and 1800.  This course studies the history of the thirteen colonies and the United States during the last third of the eighteenth century, with a concentration on the origins, nature, process, and effects of the American Revolution. Specific topics include: American colonial society in the mid-eighteenth century, the French and Indian War, the collapse of the colonial system in British North America, the War for Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, the launching of the national government, and the beginnings of American party politics

 

BOOKS:  The following paperbacks should be purchased:

Gordon S. Wood, The American Revolution: A History   

Woody Holton, Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making

of the American Revolution in Virginia

Pauline Maier, American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence

Joseph J. Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING

Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade. The final examination will count 50% of the course grade. Exams, designed to assess your command of course material and your ability to think critically and write clearly, will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor). Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at all of these examinations. Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given, for any reason.


HIS 340T • Taiwan: Colniz/Migratn/Ident

38590 • Hsu, Madeline Y.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am JGB 2.202
(also listed as AAS 325, ANS 340T)
show description

Taiwan: Colonization, Migration, and Identity

Contemporary Taiwan’s claims of an ethnic identity distinct from the Chinese mainland reference a history of multiple colonizations and migrations to and from the island.  This course will explore questions of ethnicity, empire, and modernization in East Asia from the sixteenth century to the present through encounters between aborigines, Han Chinese, Dutch, Portuguese, the imperial Qing, Fujianese, Japanese, mainlander KMT, and the United States on Taiwan. 

Texts:

Shih-Shan Henry Tsai, Maritime Taiwan: Historical Encounters with the East and the West (M.E. Sharpe, 2009)

Denny Roy, Taiwan: A Political History (Cornell University Press, 2003)
Vivian S. Louie, Compelled to Excel: Immigration, Education, and Opportunity among Chinese Americans (Stanford University Press, 2004)
Course Reader prepared by the instructor, available on Blackboard

Grading:

Map quiz:  5%

Exam: 30% Short IDs and essay

Class participation and attendance: 15%

Writing assignments: 50% Three 5-6 page essays, with one rewrite required.


HIS 343G • Italian Renaissance, 1350-1550

38595 • Frazier, Alison K.
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ 1.120
(also listed as EUS 346, R S 357, WGS 340)
show description

Description. This upper-division course combines lecture and discussion to introduce the political, social, economic, and cultural phenomena that made the Italian peninsula such a lively place between 1350 and 1550. Drawing on a range of primary source readings, we will analyze continuity and change in many realms of human experience. Emphasis will be placed upon the “recovery of learning” and its effect on areas ranging from religion and gender, to economics, technology, and art.

 

The aim of this course is to help you become more thoughtful about historical analysis of continuity and change in such contentious fields as politics, gender, and religion. By semester’s end, you will have read some of the most influential and controversial works from this period, and will be able to put them in historical context and explain why they remain compelling today.

 

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

 

Readings may include:

Boccaccio, Decameron

            Alberti, On Painting

            Machiavelli, Discourses

            Nogarola, Letters

            Castiglione, The Courtier

            Aretino, Master of the Horse

 

Assignments include:

            Map quiz

            Reading worksheets

            Two essay exams

 


HIS 343M • History Of Russia Since 1917

38600 • Wynn, Charters
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.128
(also listed as REE 335)
show description

                                  HISTORY OF RUSSIA FROM 1917

                                         HIS 343M/REE 335

 

Course Description:Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir, a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

 

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each. 

 

Textbooks:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.

Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.

Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

Course Packet: The Packet is available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

Grading:

Three in-class examinations worth one-third each.

 


HIS 343W • Witches, Workers, And Wives

38605 • Gossard, Julia M
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ B0.306
(also listed as EUS 346, WGS 345)
show description

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place. In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe. The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially. Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life. In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents. Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

Texts

Discussion of the assigned readings (see below) will be an important element of this class: you will learn more effectively when you take an active part in the analysis of the material to be covered.  Consequently you must expect to read every reading assignment very carefully and thoughtfully.  You should come to each class ready to ask questions and contribute observations.

You will need to demonstrate mastery of the readings to do well on the exams. 

Warning: absence from class will inevitably have a serious impact on your grade because you cannot participate if you are not present. Each of you may be absent twice with no penalty.  For every absence after that, three points will be deducted from your participation grade for each absence not justified by a written explanation. Please note, however, that attendance is the only the first prerequisite for participation, so that perfect attendance and complete silence will result in a grade that reflects only partial fulfillment of participation.

Daily class readings are available on electronic reserve (ER) or online through the Library Catalogue (both accessible through the library homepage) or in a xerox packet.  

Grading

Midterm     25%

Final       35%

Reading grids 20%

Witchcraft group projects   10%

Participation  10%         

 


HIS 344G • 12th-Century Renais: 1050-1200

38610 • Newman, Martha G.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as AHC 330, R S 357)
show description

European society changed so rapidly and extensively between 1050 and 1200 that medievalists often call it a "renaissance," ( a period of rebirth not to be confused with the later Italian Renaissance.) During this period, agricultural technologies changed, new forms of religious life developed, schools and universities emerged, cathedrals were built, towns became self-governing, and royal governments experimented with new forms of administration and law. Though a reading of primary documents - including love letters, memoirs, accounts of religious visions, chronicles of urban revolts, court poetry, theological treatises, and artistic creations – this course examines a series of these intellectual, religious, social, and political developments.

The goals of this course are for students 1) to identify the important events and figures in this period of rapid change; 2) to learn to read and analyze different types of medieval documents;  3) to understand how historical arguments and accounts are constructed from the analysis of primary documents; 4) to understand the interconnections between economic, social, religious, and cultural developments; and 5) to construct and write their own historical analyses.

Texts:

REQUIRED BOOKS:

Colin Morris, The Discovery of the Individual (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1987).

Galbert of Bruges, The Murder of Charles the Good, trans. James Bruce Ross (New York:  Harper and Row, 1967;  reprinted by Toronto University Press).

Paul Archambault, ed. , A Monk’s Confession:  The Memoirs of Guibert of Nogent (Pennsylvania State University Press, 1995).

Peter Abelard and Heloise, Letters and other Writings, ed. William Levitan (Hackett Publishing Company, 2007).

Georges Duby, William Marshal:  Flower of Chivalry, (New York:  Pantheon, 1987).

Highly recommended:

Christopher Brooke, Europe in the Central Middle Ages, 3nd edition (London, Longman, 2000).

In addition, selected primary documents are available on Blackboard.

Grading:

Course Requirements and Grades

•3 short (2-3-page) papers                               30% (10% each)        

•Map Test                                                       5%

•Midterm Exam                                                20%

•Final Paper (10 pages)                                    35%

•Class Participation                                           5%

•Attendance                                                     5%


HIS 345J • Coming Of Civil War, 1829-1861

38615 • Forgie, George B.
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
show description

This course investigates the political, constitutional, economic, and social causes of disunion and the American Civil War. It seeks to provide students with an understanding of how the stability of the Union was affected by key developments of the period 1829-1861, including the growth of slavery, the rise of abolitionism, the development of modern political parties, economic modernization, immigration, and territorial expansion.

Planned texts (titles subject to change):
William W. Freehling, Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy

in South Carolina, 1816-1836

Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (second edition, edited

by Blight)

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Eric Foner, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War

Grading: There will be two midterm exams; each will count 25% of the course grade. The final examination, which will be cumulative, will count 40% of the course grade. These exams will consist mainly of essay questions on the material from the classes and readings. In addition to the three exams, unannounced short, objective-question quizzes will be given frequently at the beginning of class, testing mastery of  recent course material. These quizzes will constitute 10% of a student’s course grade.


HIS 346T • Cuban Revolution & The US

38630 • Brown, Jonathan C.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 3.122
(also listed as LAS 366)
show description

Students in this course will investigate why the Cuban Revolution of 1959 had an impact beyond its shores, essentially transforming both Inter-American and East-West relations. At the outset, students then will survey the history of Cuban-U.S. relations from the so-called Spanish American War to the Great Depression. We will next analyze the populist period in Cuba that ended up in the dictatorship of General Fulgencio Batista and how a middle-class rebellion forced him from power on January 1, 1959. Then we will take a long look at the process by which Fidel Castro consolidated political power, mobilized the popular classes for revolutionary reforms, and turned to an alliance with the Soviet Union. We pay special attention to the revolution's influence on social organization, gender relations, and education. The students must also understand the relationship between popular demands, political consolidation, and Cuba's external relations. Finally, the class will assess how the Cuban Revolution affected U.S.-Latin American relations and why Castro choose to support other revolutions in Latin America and Africa.

Texts:

Sebastian Balfour, Castro
Lois M. Smith, Sex and Revolution
Ernesto “Che” Guevara, Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War

Grading:

Student requirements and preparations for the course include reading three paperback books and two articles in a reading packet, viewing video documentaries, participating in class discussions, and attending lectures. In addition, each student will turn in a map assignment and a 5-page essay based on a book selected from the bibliography of our readings. 

One's final grade will consist of the following graded exercises:
-A map assignment worth 5 % of the final grade or 50 points.
-A mid-term exam worth 20 % of the final grade or 200 points.
-A written book essay worth 35 % of the final grade or 350 points.
-A final exam worth 40 % of the final grade or 400 points.

The accumulation of points at the end of the semester will determine the student's final grade: i.e., 900 points or more for an A, 800 or more for a B, and so forth.


HIS 346W • Church & State In Lat Amer

38635 • Stauffer, Brian
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am NOA 1.102
(also listed as LAS 366, R S 368)
show description

This class surveys the conflict-ridden history of Church-State relations in Latin America from the late colonial period to the current era of Pope Francis. Since Catholicism has exerted a singularly powerful influence in the region since the Iberian conquests of the fifteenth century, the class focuses especially on the history of the Roman Catholic Church and its changing relationship to Latin America’s emerging national states. Organized both chronologically and thematically, it examines the challenges facing Latin American churches after independence, the origins of the Church-State conflicts of the early republican period, and the development of liberalism and anticlericalism. We also consider the Church’s role in the partisan and revolutionary conflicts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and we assess its varied responses to the great political and social transformations of the period (the rise of social Catholicism and Catholic political parties, the “feminization of piety,” the mobilization of the laity, the development of Liberation Theology). In order to illuminate these broader themes and draw comparative conclusions between them, we focus in on particular cases (especially Mexico, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecuador, Argentina, and Brazil) in our readings, lectures, and film viewings. Religious pluralism and the rise of Latin American Protestantism are also briefly considered in the final weeks of the course, particularly in light of the their ramifications for the development of nominally secular polities in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.


HIS 347L • Seminar In Historiography

38640 • Spellberg, Denise A.
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 0.132
show description

SEMINAR IN HISTORIOGRAPHY: HONORS PROGRAM

Open only to students admitted to the History Honors program.

This seminar introduces students to a range of historical methods, topics, and sources, with no claim to being comprehensive. We will consider how “history” has changed along with other forms of knowledge. We will read different kinds of history (social, intellectual, cultural, and so on). We emphasize research with primary sources that students will be able to use in their theses.

Faculty from the Department of History will lead discussions about their areas of expertise, giving the class examples of documents and sources that historians use, or showing how they generate questions for research.  By the end of the semester, each student will have come up with an advisor and a prospectus for the senior thesis she or he will write next year.

This is a reading- and writing-intensive course, and it moves quickly from introductory to advanced work.

 REQUIREMENTS:

1)   preparation for and participation in each weekly seminar, including short writing assignments (40%). Reading is about 200 pages a week.

2)   the various steps in drafting and revising a 10-12 page research prospectus as described below (60%). The preliminary stages of research entail reading at least 10-15 books, review essays, and articles.

You will meet with me individually to consult on your topic a little over halfway through the semester. Short topic statements and bibliography are due a week later. We will spend the last three weeks of class in editorial session: discussing the structure, prose, style, and subject of each prospectus.

PROSPECTUS

         A prospectus is a “description in advance of a proposed undertaking.” It sets out your topic based on preliminary research. It should identify the problem or event that will be investigated, explain why it is important, survey the historical literature on the subject, describe the primary sources you will use, and discuss how you intend to carry out the work.

 The prospectus is not binding; you will certainly change your topic in some way during your senior year, and you may change it entirely. It is nonetheless very important preparation. It also requires substantial background work. I expect you to have looked at and read in at least 10 books, articles, and review essays.

The prospectus should also include a bibliography and four to six photocopied samples of primary sources. You may discuss the usefulness of the sources in either the text of the prospectus or in notes attached to the copies of the sources.


HIS 350L • Medicine In African History

38645 • Osseo-Asare, Abena Dove
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 1.122
(also listed as AFR 372D)
show description

Medicine in African History

 

How do societies understand illness, and how do they restore good health? In this course, we explore how communities have confronted disease throughout Africa’s history. During the first six weeks, we read about the changing role of specialist healers since the 1700s, including shamans, malams, nurses, and drug peddlers. The second half of the course turns to the history of specific health concerns and diseases including malaria, reproductive health, and AIDS through regional case studies. Particular emphasis is placed on pre-colonial healing, medical education, colonial therapeutics, and the impact of environmental change.

 

This course offers participants a nuanced, historical perspective on the current health crisis in Africa. Staggering figures place the burden of global disease in Africa; not only AIDS and malaria, but also pneumonia, diarrhea and mental illness significantly affect the lives of everyday people. Studying the history of illness and healing in African societies provides a framework with which to interpret the social, political, and environmental factors shaping international health today.

 

Texts:

Timothy Burke

Lifebuoy Men, Lux Women: Commodification, Consumption and Cleanliness in Modern Zimbabwe (Duke, 1996)

 

Steven Feierman, John M. Janzen

The Social Basis of Health and Healing in Africa (California, 1992)

 

Nancy Rose Hunt

A colonial lexicon: Birth Ritual, Medicalization, and Mobility in the Congo

(Duke, 1999)

 

John Illiffe

The African AIDS Epidemic: A History

(Ohio, 2006)

Maryinez Lyons,

The Colonial Disease: A Social History of Sleeping Sickness in Northern Zaire, 1900-1940

(Cambridge, 2002)

Malidoma Patrice Some

Of Water and the Spirit: Ritual, Magic, and Initiation in the Life of an African Shaman (Penguin Books, 1995)

 

Grading:

Course participants will make two oral and written reports on weekly assignments. There will also be one longer research paper (12-15 pages) on the history of a particular health concern.


HIS 350L • Poland & The Second World War

38650 • Lichtenstein, Tatjana
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 2.606
show description

One historian has described Poland during the Second World War as “the devil’s playground.” During the war, 1 in 5 Pole died, hundreds of thousands were displaced, entire cities, regions, and communities destroyed. The Germans murdered almost all of Poland’s Jews and made the country the staging ground for the Holocaust. This course examines the occupation of Poland by Germany and the Soviet Union and the ways in which this dual occupation impacted people and their communities. We will explore topics such as the social and racial experiments undertaken by German and Soviet authorities; mass displacement and interethnic relations; collaboration and resistance; genocide and ethnic cleansing, as well as the ways in which the memory of the Second World War in Poland has evolved.

 

Texts:

  • Wesley Adamczyk, When God Looked the Other Way: An Odyssey of War, Exile, and Redemption (The University of Chicago Press, 2004)
  • Jerzy Andrzejewski, Holy Week: A Novel of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising (1945)
  • The Diary of Mary Berg: Growing Up in the Warsaw Ghetto (originally published 1945)
  • Jan T. Gross, Neighbors: The Destruction of the Jewish Community of Jedwabne, Poland (Penguin, 2000).
  • Jan Karski, Story of a Secret State: My Report to the World (Georgetown University Press, reprint edition, 2013)
  • Halik Kochanski, The Eagle Unbowed: Poland and the Poles in the Second World War (Harvard University Press, 2012)
  • Course reader

 

Grading:

Attendance and Participation                                     30%

Book Essay I                                                                       15%

Book Essay II                                                                     15%

Group Project (Presentation)                                      40%


HIS 350L • Struggle For Asian Democrcy

38660 • Guha, Sumit
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

India: The struggle to build an Asian democracy, 1947-2008

HIS 350 L (38660); ANS 361 (30820). Meets Mondays 3-6 PM, GAR 0.132

Instructor: Sumit Guha

Office: GAR 2.140 Email: sguha@austin.utexas.edu

Office hours: Wed. 2-4 PM & by appointment

Description:

The republic of India was the largest of the many Asian and African states that emerged from the retreat of Western empires after 1945. It emerged in unpropitious circumstances of bloodshed and acute poverty, but has uniquely avoided both civil war and dictatorship through the decades that followed. Students in this course will explore the dangers that beset the fledgling democracy and the many efforts needed to sustain and widen it.

            This course carries a Writing Flag. Such classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility as established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Writing Flag courses are designed to improve student expertise with writing in an academic discipline, in this case, History.  This course teaches students two distinct and graduated forms of analytic writing. One is the art of reviewing: it begins with learning to summarize (present the main points of another text concisely) and is completed by learning the skill of evaluating texts in comparison with other texts.

Textbooks:

Ramachandra Guha India after Gandhi: The History of the World’s Largest Democracy. New York: Harper Collins, 2008. Paperback edition. ISBN: 9780060958589. Required

Mukulika Banerjee Why India Votes? London: Routledge 2014. ISBN 978-1-138-01971-3 Required

Other readings will be available free on Canvas, or online via the UT Library system.

Evaluation:

Attendance and participation 33%

Précis of early reading 10%.

Book Review draft and final version 22%

Final essay draft and final 35%

Points will be converted to letter grades as follows:

 

86-100=       A

70-85=         B

55-69=          C

40-54=         D

Below 40=   F


HIS 350L • The Galileo Affair

38670 • Hunt, Bruce J.
Meets MW 300pm-430pm GAR 0.120
(also listed as R S 357)
show description

This course focuses on the life and work of Galileo Galilei (1564–1642), particularly his conflict with Church authorities and his condemnation in 1633. We will also put Galileo’s work in several broader contexts: the development of science in the 16th and 17th centuries; court life and patronage in early modern Italy; and the history of relations between science and religion.

This course carries flags for Writing, Global Cultures, and Independent Inquiry. We will emphasize clear and effective writing, attention to cultural differences, independent research in primary sources, and active class discussion.

Texts:

Richard Blackwell, Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible,

Maurice Finocchiaro (ed.), The Galileo Affair: A Documentary History,

Maurice Finocchiaro (ed.), The Essential Galileo,

Dava Sobel, Galileo’s Daughter,

plus a set of additional readings.

Grading:

Each student will co-lead a class discussion during the semester, and will write:

— a short paper (3–4 pages) on a topic related to the class presentation;

— a longer research paper (16–20 pages), a draft version of which the student will present and circulate to the class for discussion;

— a formal critique (2–3 pages) of another student’s draft paper.

Grades will be based on the class presentation (10%), the short paper (10%), the presentation of the draft of the longer paper (10%), the final version of the longer paper (45%), the critique (10%), and participa­tion in class discussions (15%).


HIS 350L • Hist Of Modern Central Amer

38673 • Garrard-Burnett, Virginia
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GDC 1.406
(also listed as LAS 366)
show description

This course will chronicle the history of Central America from the independence period to the present day.  The class will focus on the Liberal-Conservative political polemic during the nineteenth century.  It will examine the economic and political relationships that evolved between these nations and the foreign industrial powers, particularly the United States at the beginning of this century.  Moving forward, we will explore the social and political turmoil that characterized the region during the last decades of the twentieth century, interrogating the “Central American crisis” of the late 1970s and 1980s through the interpretive lenses of the Cold War and also of local resistance. Finally, this course will examine the “paradox of peace”—the rebuilding of civil society in Central America and issues of historic memory in the post-war period.

Learning Objectives:

Part I: Explores the formative political ideologies and economic and social structures that evolved during the Central American nations’ quests for nationhood during the nineteenth century.

Part II: Deals with the Anglo-American rivalry on the isthmus and the emergence of the American economic and political hegemony in Central American during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Part III: Examines Central America’s social and political revolutions that took place during the second half of the twentieth century. Here, we will explore the impact of the Cold War on Central America, and the paradox of peace in the early 21st century.

Texts:

Woodward, R.L.  Central America: A Nation Divided, 3rd ed. (Oxford, 1999).

Please bring a notebook to keep track of the (many) primary-source readings we will go over in class.

Grading:

Final grades are based on the following:

                                    Reviews and projects: 30%

                                    Research paper:  60%

                                    Participation:    10%


HIS 350L • Law & Society Early Mod Eur

38675 • Hardwick, Julie
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as EUS 346, WGS 340)
show description

This research seminar will focus on how historians have explored the significance of law, criminal and civil, in the lives of early modern Europeans. We will explore how historians have used legal records to explore patterns of criminality (which were very highly gendered at the time, for example infanticide and fornication for women and drunkenness and theft for men) and rapidly growing rates of civil litigation (for instance over debt, slander and family disputes of various kinds).   We will investigate how historians have used court cases to examine a wide variety of issues for which few other sources survive, especially in terms of everyday social, cultural and economic patterns for families and communities.  We will combine reading the work of historians with our own readings of cases as preliminaries to research projects in which students will work on a case of their own choosing for their term papers.

Texts:

Readings will be assigned for most class meetings in the first part of the semester until we move to working on the research projects.  The readings will be a mixture of journal articles (available on line through the PCL website), original legal documents (posted on BlackBoard) and a course packet to be purchased.

For some basic background into early modern Europe, I recommend: Euan Cameron, ed., Early Modern Europe: an Oxford History (in the PCL and widely available on line either new or used).

Grading:

Research papers 60% (5% proposal, 20% paper, 35% revised paper)

Peer review of research paper 5%

Group projects 20%

Participation 15% (attendance, informed discussion, engagement with presentations, leading discussion)


HIS 350L • Stalin's Russia At War

38680 • Wynn, Charters
Meets WF 130pm-300pm CLA 2.606
show description

Violence, famine, and epidemic disease took more than fifty million Soviet lives between 1914 and 1953.  Over half of these deaths occurred between 1941 and 1945, when the Soviet Union fought the most savage and immense war in history.  No other nation ever endured anything like it.  The Soviets defeated the invading Axis powers despite the purge of its military leadership in 1937, horrible mistakes at the outset of the war, and widespread hostility within the country to the Stalinist regime.  We will focus on the impact of the Stalinist state’s brutal revolution from above, popular and elite fears and beliefs during the Great Terror, the death and destruction during the German occupation, as well as the courage and barbarism in the fight to the death on the Eastern Front, especially during the Battles of Moscow, Stalingrad, Kursk, and Berlin.  Evaluating the role of Stalin (or “Uncle Joe” as the American and British public knew him) and his inner circle, as well as what the Stalinist Revolution and “Great Patriotic War” meant for ordinary Soviets, will be of particular concern.

Texts:

Kevin McDermott, Stalin.

S. A. Smith, The Russian Revolution.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Lydia Chukovskaya, Sofia Petrovna.

Richard Overy, Russia’s War.

Catherine Merridale, Ivan’s War.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Lee Baker, The Second World War on the Eastern Front.

Course Packet available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St.

Grading:

This course contains a substantial writing component.  During the course of the semester students will write four critical analyses of assigned reading, five pages in length each.  In addition, by 11:00 a.m. on most class days, students will e-mail me three questions dealing with that day’s reading.  The final grade is based on both the written assignments (60% essays; 10% questions) and classroom participation (30%).


HIS 350L • Einstein In Age Of Conflict

38685 • Martínez, Alberto A.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.122
(also listed as CTI 371)
show description

While age-old scientific concepts were being overturned by the rise of modern physics, Europe was torn apart by wars of unprecedented scale. This history course analyzes these developments, examining the rise of the theories of relativity and quantum mechanics against the stage of international political upheavals. Following the life of Albert Einstein, the course focuses on conceptual developments (from the 1880s through the 1940s) and intellectual conflicts. It also studies the lives of physicists such as Max Planck, Werner Heisenberg, and J. Robert Oppenheimer, in the context of changing cultural and political environments. We will read and discuss various kinds of materials: manuscripts, letters, accounts by historians, physicists, essays, and even secret transcripts of controversial conversations. The material will be understandable even to students with no significant background in physics. Among the topics involved are the following: How did relativity and the quantum clash with earlier conceptions of nature? Why did physics become so apparently difficult to understand? In Europe and America, how did scientists and politicians behave in times of international catastrophe? How were the academic and social orders affected by the development of nuclear weapons?

 

Texts:

•           Jürgen Neffe, Einstein: A Biography, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.

•           John Heilbron, The Dilemmas of an Upright Man. Max Planck and the Fortunes of German Science. Harvard University Press, 2000.

 

Grading:

•           One reaction essay, of 600 words in length. 

•           One historical analysis paper, 1000 words. The topic of the historical analysis paper will be individually selected by each student from a few alternatives. 

•           Final Research Paper, of at least 2500 words. A draft of the introduction or outline of the Research Paper will be expected 3 weeks before the final due date; for critical feedback. The subject of the final Research Paper will be designed by each student under advisement with the Instructor. This will equal 75% of the grade for the course.


HIS 350L • Decolonizatn Of Brit Empire

38690 • Louis, Wm. Roger
Meets TH 330pm-630pm CLA 0.104
(also listed as LAH 350)
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 


HIS 350L • Indian Ocean Travel & Trade

38700 • Talbot, Cynthia
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

This undergraduate seminar examines long-distance travel and trade in the Indian Ocean region from approximately 1000 to 1700 AD.  It looks both at the experiences of individual travelers as recorded in narratives about their journeys, and also at larger patterns of trade, migration, exploration, and conquest within this extensive region extending from the shores of East Africa to Japan.  Although the course explores the significance of travel narratives as a genre of literature, the emphasis is on the historical developments that led to growing travel from one world region to another and also on the cultural differences reflected in the accounts.  The greatest attention is paid to the Indian subcontinent, due to its focal point in the region, but other sectors of the Indian Ocean are also considered.  A comparative perspective is fostered through analysis of travel accounts written by people from the Middle East and China, in addition to the more abundant travel literature produced by Europeans.

Students will be exposed to a variety of traders and travelers in the first part of the course, as well as to recent ideas about travel literature as a whole.  Toward the end of the semester, students will engage in individual research on a topic of their own choice.  Possible topics for research include an in-depth analysis of a specific traveler, a comparison of writings on a particular region by different types of travelers such as traders and missionaries, an analysis of differing attitudes towards different regions by the same type of traveler, or a study of changes in trade routes to a region.

Texts:

1) Michael Pearson, The Indian Ocean (Seas in History)

2) Louise Levathis, When China Ruled the Seas

3) Michael Fisher , Visions of Mughal India

4) Michael Cooper, They Came to Japan

5) Roxani E. Margariti, Aden and the Indian Ocean Trade

6) course pack

 

Grading:

5 reading responses                                20%

2 drafts of analytical paper                     25%

research paper proposal                            5%

oral presentation of research                    5%

2 drafts of research paper                       30%

attendance & participation                     15%


HIS 350L • Writing Violence In History

38705 • Brower, Benjamin Claude
Meets T 330pm-630pm BEN 1.122
(also listed as MES 343)
show description

Violence has been a constant feature of history yet it is a topic that historians have had trouble understanding and explaining.  Endemic and problematic, violence is also ever changing and many hued, making its study especially difficult. This seminar will focus on the skills necessary for the historian working on violent phenomena.  We shall examine how historians themselves have approached episodes of violence, but we will also look outside of the discipline of history to see how psychoanalysts, anthropologists, novelists, and activists have both understood violence and how they represent it in their work. This is a research and writing course.  This means that students will be required to develop experience working in historical sources and, in particular, demonstrate mastery of advanced writing skills.

Texts:

•           Alain Corbin, Village of Cannibals (Harvard University Press: 2006). ISBN 0674939018.

•           Sven Lindqvist, A History of Bombing (New Press, 2003).  ISBN 1565848160.

•           Toni Morrison, Beloved (Vintage, 2004). ISBN 1400033411.

•           Enzo Traverso, The Origins of Nazi Violence (New Press, 2003). ISBN 1565847881.

•           Simone Weil and Rachel Bespaloff, War and the Iliad (NYRB Classics, 2005). ISBN 1590171454.

•           Georges Vigarello, A History of Rape: Sexual Violence in France from the 16th to the 20th Century (Polity Press, 2001), ISBN: 0745621708

Grading:

Short Papers:           30% (15% each)                 

Final Essay               50%

Presentation             10%

Participation             10%


HIS 350R • Jews In American Entertainment

38710 • Ernst, Christopher
Meets TTH 800am-930am GAR 2.128
(also listed as AMS 370, J S 364)
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 350R • Myth/Construc Of Amer Ident

38715 • Restad, Penne L.
Meets MW 300pm-430pm SAC 5.102
show description

What defines an American? Is it the love of liberty, the pursuit of justice, the urge to invent, the desire for wealth, the drive to explore? The purpose of this seminar is to examine--through reading, discussion, and writing—the historical origins of and perspectives on “American identity,” to investigate the stories about ourselves and our past that we have developed to illustrate and confirm its elements, and to assess ongoing claims to American exceptionalism.  

Texts:

Tentative Text Assignments:

Crevecouer,  “What is an American?”  

Horwitz, Confederates in the Attic

David R. Jansson, “American National Identity and the Progress of the New South”

Horatio Alger, Ragged Dick  

Kao and Copulsky, “The Pledge of Allegiance” 

Tom Englehardt, The End of Victory Culture

Jim Cullen, The American Dream

Hackney, “The American Identity”

Additional readings as assigned on the course website.

Grading:

Grades will be determined on the basis class participation and attendance (15%), short papers (40%), individual and collaborative visual presentations (5%), and a 7 to 10-page research paper project (assembled in stages) (40%). Plus and minus will be used in assigning a course grade.


HIS 350R • Amer Cul Hist Alchl/Drugs

38720 • Smith, Mark C.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 436A
(also listed as AMS 370)
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of United States history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

 

 



HIS 350R • Black Women In America

38725 • Berry, Daina Ramey
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as AFR 374D, WGS 340)
show description

In an White House Blog posted on 10 February 2012, First Lady Michelle Obama announced the 2012 theme for Black History Month: Celebrating Black Women in American Culture and History. “They are women,” she explained, “who fought against slavery, who stood up for

Women’s suffrage, and marched in our streets for our civil rights.”  Continuing, she noted that African American women also  “… stirred our souls and they’ve open our hearts.”  In addition to celebrating Black Women’s contributions, we must also look at the struggles women overcame to be a part of the American fabric; struggles over their images, representation, and reputation.

To that end, the course will use primary sources, historical monographs, and essays to provide a chronological and thematic overview of the experiences of black women in America from their African roots to the circumstances they face in the present era.  This seminar class will be discussion driven and will address the following topics: the evolution of African American women’s history as field of inquiry; African American women historians; the trans-Atlantic slave trade; enslavement in the United States; abolition and freedom; racial uplift; urban migration; labor and culture; the modern civil rights movement; organized black feminism; hip-hop culture; AIDS and the Black Women's Health study.  Additionally, the course will draw upon readings written by and about African American women with a particularly emphasis on their approach to gender and race historiography

Texts:

Assata Shakur, Assata: An Autobiography

Tera Hunter, To Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labor After the Civil War (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1997).

Catherine M. Lewis and J. Richard Lewis, eds., Women and Slavery in America: A Documentary History (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 2011).

Eric McDuffie, Sojourning for Freedom: Black Women, American Communism, and the Making of Black Left Feminism (Durham: Duke University Press, 2011).

Deborah Gray White, Ar’n’t I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South (New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 1985).

Additional readings will be distributed electronically on Blackboard.

Grading:

Class Engagement       20%  

Posting Responses to the Week’s Readings   10%

Cultural Critique         20%

Outline of Research Paper with Annotated Bibliography      15%

Final Research Paper and Presentation           35%


HIS 350R • Hist Of American Feminism

38730 • Seaholm, Megan
Meets T 330pm-630pm WEL 3.260
(also listed as WGS 345)
show description

This upper-division seminar class will investigate various aspects and/or movements of feminism in the United States.  Although we will look at issues of women’s equality in the colonial period, we will spend most of our time studying 19th and 20th century feminist or female advocacy activity including women in the anti-slavery movement, mid-19th century women’s rights advocates, the 19th and early 20th century woman suffrage movement, late 19th century women’s advocacy groups like the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, post World War II women’s rights activism and the Women’s Liberation Movement, as well as what is being tentatively called “Third Wave Feminism.”

        Students will be expected to read several book length publications over the course of the semester, and students will be expected to participate in weekly class discussion.

Texts:

•  Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women’s Movement Changed America (Penguin Press, 2000).

•  Nancy Cott, The Grounding of Modern Feminism

•  Rosalyn Terborg-Penn, African American Women and the Struggle for the Vote

•  In addition, several essays and documents will be required reading posted on the class Canvas website.

Grading:

• 60% of course grade based on weighted average of writing assignments.

• 40% of course grade based on class participation.


HIS 350R • Domestic Slave Trade

38735 • Berry, Daina Ramey
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 0.132
(also listed as AFR 374D, WGS 340)
show description

In 1846, Archibald McMillin a North Carolina planter wrote to his wife during one of his many sojourns in the domestic slave trade. He informed her that he “could not sell in Darlington or Sumpter, [South Carolina,]” but that he was going to spend the day” in Charleston looking at sales at auction.”  Perhaps Charleston would prove a better market then the other cities, but if not, he would probably go further into the Deep South. Like the invention of the cotton gin was to the expansion of slavery into western territories, the domestic slave trade represented “the lifeblood of the southern slave system” according to historian Steven Deyle.  More than one million African Americans entered the domestic market and found themselves in coffles traveling by foot to various markets or were placed on boats and taken down the Mississippi River. Some traveled by ship along the Atlantic seaboard to port cities with large markets such as Savannah. 

This course will explore the inner-workings of the domestic slave trade from the perspectives of slaveholders, speculators, and the enslaved.  Students will have the opportunity to analyze maps, letters, diaries, newspaper advertisements, and legislation relating to the domestic slave trade. 

Texts:

Johnson, Walter. Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market. New York:

 Harvard University Press, 2001.

Johnson, Walter, ed. The Chattel Principle: Internal Slave Trades in the Americas. New

 Haven: Yale University Press, 2005.

 Shermerhorn, Calvin. Money Over Mastery Family Over Freedom: Slavery in the

 Antebellum Upper South. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011.

Tadman, Michael. Speculators and Slaves: Masters, Traders, and Slaves in the Old South.        Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1989.

Recommended Readings:

 Bancroft, Frederic. Slave Trading in the Old South. 1931. Reprint, Columbia: University of

South Carolina Press, 1996.

 

Campbell, Stanley W. The Slave Catchers. Chapel Hill University of North Carolina Press,

 1970.

 

Catterall, Helen Tunncliff, ed. Judicial Cases Concern American Slavery and the Negro, 5

vols.  Washington, D.C.: Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1926-37.

 

Deyle, Steven. Carry Me Back: The Domestic Slave Trade in American Life. New York:

Oxford University Press, 2005.

 

Gudmestad, Robert. A Troublesome Commerce: The Transformation of the Interstate Slave

Trade. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2003.

 

Hadden, Sally. Slave Patrols: Law and Violence in Virginia and the Carolinas. New York:

 Harvard University Press, 2001.

 

Martin, Jonathan. Divided Mastery: Slave Hiring in the American South. New York:

Harvard University Press, 2004.

 

Rothman, Adam. Slave Country: American Expansion and the Origins of the Deep South.

 New York: Harvard University Press, 2005.

Electronic readings will be distributed or placed on Blackboard

Grading:

Attendance and Participation 10%

Response Papers 10%

Mapping and Historical Marker Project 10%

Primary Document Analysis 10%

Oral Presentation 20%

Research Proposal and Bibliography 5%

Rough Draft of Final Paper 10%

Final Paper 25%

 


HIS 350R • Debating Amer Revolution

38740 • Olwell, Robert A.
Meets TH 330pm-630pm GAR 0.132
show description

In this course, students will examine, through discussions,  lectures, and an extended exercise in historical role playing, the precipitant events and ideas leading up to the American Declaration of Independence in July 1776.  The first half of the semester will be comprised of lectures, readings, and discussions on the Imperial Crisis between Britain and the British American colonies.  The second half of the semester will be organized around the “Reacting to the Past” game: “Patriots, Loyalists, and Revolution, in New York City, 1775-1776” (created by William Offutt). At the start of the game, students will each be assigned a “character” (who might be a patriot, loyalist, or neutral, wealthy, “middling,” poor, or slave) who they will portray through the subsequent six class sessions, moving through time from the spring of 1776 until the summer of 1776.  Students must individually determine, describe, and depict how they believe their character would respond to historical events, and attempt to persuade others to support their position. Collectively, the class will decide if New York City will decide to join the revolution and declare independence or support the King in his effort to suppress the rebellion. During this half of the course, besides their active participation in the “game,” students will each write several “position papers” explaining their assigned character’s perspective on changing events.

Texts:

Bernard Bailyn, The Ordeal of Thomas Hutchinson, (1974).

Theodore Draper, A Struggle for Power: The American Revolution, (1997).    

Richard Ketchum, Divided Loyalties: How the American Revolution Came to New York, (2002).

William Offutt, Patriots, Loyalists, and Revolution in New York City, 1775-1776, (2011).

Alfred Young, The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution,  (1999).

Grading:

Participation 20%

Book report  20%

Take-home exam 30%

Position papers 30%


HIS 354D • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

38755 • Gulizio, Joann
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WEL 3.266
(also listed as AHC 325, C C 354D)
show description

This course covers Greek history from the fall of Athens in 404 BC through Greece's loss of independence to Rome some 250 years later--an era defined by the figure of Alexander the Great.

Classes will focus on five successive periods: (1) the decline of Greece's independent city-states; (2) their subordination to a Greek-speaking Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; (3) Alexander's conquest of the Persian Empire; (4) the resulting Hellenistic Age of Greek kingdoms in Egypt, Syria and Macedonia; and (5) Rome's absorption of both Macedonia and mainland Greece.

The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key developments in culture and society, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era.  There will be two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.


HIS 354N • France In Modern Times

38765 • Coffin, Judith G.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 2.606
show description

This course surveys the major themes of French history from 1900 to the present, with an emphasis on World Wars 1 and 2 and their legacies. For most of the nineteenth century, France stood as a beacon of democracy, liberalism, and European culture. In the first half of the twentieth century, the country provided one of the most dramatic examples of the sudden and devastating collapse of all those things. In the second half of the century, France has offered a case study in a crisis of national identity -- a crisis produced by the traumas of war, the end of colonial empire, and the pressures of "Americanization" and European integration. We will look especially closely at victory in World War I and then defeat and collaboration in World War II.

Open to students in the Normandy program.


HIS 355N • Main Curr Of Amer Cul To 1865

38770 • Smith, Mark C.
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 130
(also listed as AMS 355)
show description

"Who is this new man, this American?" Hector St. John de Crevecoeur

 

In many ways, what we now call the United States began as a national entity as a blank slate.  As late as two hundred years ago, there was no conception of what it meant to be American.  Yet, within seventy-five years, this entity would fight its most bloody and vicious war ever over insistence upon this very identity.

 

This course traces the concept of the American identity in cultural terms from the time of first settlements up until the Civil War.  We will study not politics per se but political ideas and institutions as well as such subjects as religion, work, gender roles, race, painting, literature, philosophy, the law, and social reform.  Throughout the course and especially in the assigned reading the emphasis will be upon the interaction of the lives of ordinary people including women, Native Americans, ethnic immigrants, and African Americans and the newly developing ideas and institutions that helped create this new American identity.  The books, indeed, will all be about very specific ordinary people—except for the very extraordinary Frederick Douglass—and the impact of a rapidly changing society upon their lives.

 

Requirements

There will three exams with the first counting slightly less than the final two.  Both will consist of identification and essay questions.

 

Possible Texts

William Cronon Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England

James Horn A Land as God Made It: Jamestown and the Birth of America

Alfred Young, The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution

Laurel Taylor Ulrich A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard Based on Her Diary,1785-1812

Carol Sheriff, The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and the Paradox of Progress

Paul Johnson, Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper

Frederick Douglass, A Narrative of the Life of


HIS 355P • United States Since 1941

38775 • Lawrence, Mark Atwood
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am GAR 0.102
show description

This course surveys the rich and controversial history of the United States since the nation’s entry into the Second World War, arguably the most important breaking point in American history.  Above all, the course focuses on the rise of the United States as a global power, the expansion of rights for women and minorities, and the debate over the appropriate role of the federal government in regulating the American economy and society.  At the end of the course, students should be prepared for more specialized coursework in recent American history.  The course also aims to encourage students to think like historians.  That is, it encourages students to evaluate primary sources and competing opinions about the past and arrive at their own conclusions. 

Course requirements will be one midterm, a paper of approximately 5 pages, a final exam, and several quizzes scattered throughout the term.

Possible texts include H.W. Brands, American Dreams; Julian E. Zelizer, The Fierce Urgency of Now; Ann Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi; Lisa McGirr, Suburban Warriors; Elaine Tyler May, Homeward Bound; James Mann, Rise of the Vulcans; Kurt Vonnegut, Cat’s Cradle; and Gregory Schneider, ed., Conservatism in America Since 1930

 


HIS 356K • Main Curr Amer Cul Since 1865

38780 • Davis, Janet M.
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 136
(also listed as AMS 356)
show description

This interdisciplinary survey explores various cultural and social transformations in  American society from the post-Civil War era to the present.  Broadly construed, this course will examine the relationship between culture, technology, industrialization, urbanization, and American identity (using race, gender and class as ways to analyze America’s multicultural society)  over the last century and a half.  After a brief,  introductory exploration of the enormous social,  cultural and economic changes wrought by the Civil War—the bloodiest conflagration in American history—we  will study  the cultural landscape of a rapidly industrializing society in which roaring locomotives created a new sense of time and national identity .  Our journey will take us from the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad to the moon landing and internet.  Along the way, we will also consider the rise of the consumer society, the birth of mass culture, immigration, overseas expansion, modernism, feminism, regionalism, the new leisure culture, and the enduring mythology of the self-made man/woman.  Our examination of American culture is interdisciplinary and broadly defined to include fine arts, sports, music, literature, popular culture, architecture, anthropology, social thought, the built environment and  material culture. Ultimately, our goal is to investigate and evaluate how multiple  Americans—from presidents to the dispossessed—have made sense of explosive social transformations through cultural forms.

 

 

Class format:  This is primarily a lecture course, but I will always leave some time available during each class for discussion.

Requirements:   Regular attendance, completion of all reading assignments, three in-class ID (short answer) exams, and two take-home essay exams, one of which will be cumulative. 

                      

Possible Reading List (Please Note: This will likely change):

 

Horatio Alger, Ragged Dick

Booker T. Washington, Up from Slavery

Sinclair Lewis, Babbitt

Studs Terkel, Hard Times (selected portions)

Laura Hillenbrand, Unbroken

Tony Horwitz, Confederates in the Attic


HIS 357D • African Amer Hist Since 1860

38785 • Walker, Juliet E. K.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 1.126
(also listed as AFR 357D, AMS 321F, URB 353)
show description

Assessments of the historic experience of African Americans from the Civil War and Reconstruction to the Civil Rights Era and the Second Reconstruction, i.e., the post-Civil Rights Era from the 1970s through 2014, provide the focus of this course.  Emphasis will be placed on the political, economic, including the business activities, as well as social and cultural activities of African Americans. The course begins with assessing the Black American experience during the Civil War and Reconstruction.  In the immediate first post-Reconstruction, the Exodus of 1879 is considered along with the founding and building of Black Towns. Also, legal and extralegal means, including violence, disfranchisement and segregation of Blacks, that is, the rise of Jim Crow, at the turn of the century and the Great Migration of the WWI era are examined. Ideologies of black leaders during that period, W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells and Marcus Garvey are compared.

 

The rise of the black urban ghetto and impact of African American working class as it relates to African American culture provide the focus for examining the twentieth century Black Experience. The Harlem Renaissance and the conditions of blacks in the Great Depression and WWII to the 1954 Brown decision provide an introduction to the Black Freedom Movement of the 1960s. Assessments are made of the riots in the 1960s, ideologies of Black leaders and black organizations, CORE, SNCC, and Black Panthers. Agendas of post-Civil rights era black social, political and business leaders are examined, such as Houston’s Case Lawal, hip hop entrepreneurs and the first two black billionaires, Robert Johnson (BET) and Oprah Winfrey..

 

Significantly, the course begins with a Civil War, marking an end of slavery and the beginning of black political participation. It ends with the historical phenomenon of the election of Barack Obama, the first African American President of the United States. What does this say about race/racism in America? What about Katrina and Black Reconstruction in New Orleans in 2009 as well as “the $40 Million Dollar slave” 149 years after the 13th Amendment? The course ends with commentaries on retrenchment in affirmative action, commodification of African American culture, and assessments of America’s changing racial demographics on African Americans in the 21st century.

 

Texts:

Franklin, John H. and Evelyn Higginbotham,  From Slavery to Freedom,9th ed, paper

Henry, Charles P, Allen, R , and Chrisma, R. The Obama Phenomenon: Toward a Multiracial Democracy

Holt Thomas and Barkley-Brown, E., Major Problems, African American History vol 2 

Rhoden, William C., Forty Million Dollar Slaves: The Rise, Fall,  Redemption of the Black Athlete

Smith-Shomade, Beretta,   Pimpin’ Ain’t Easy: Selling Black Entertainment Television

Walker, Juliet E. K. The History of Black Business in America -course packet

 

Grading:

Exam 1  (Take home)                    30

History Research Paper                 30

Student Panel Presentation           10

Exam  2(Take Home) m                 30


HIS 362G • Communist Consumr Cul E Eur

38789 • Nagy, Shannon
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GEA 127
(also listed as EUS 346, REE 335)
show description

Description:

Building communism in the Eastern bloc was a part of a larger project to create political and cultural liberalization as well as economic and social modernization. In 1919, Vladimir Lenin declared archaeology a bourgeois science and subsequently transformed archaeology into the study of material culture, with the hope that the study of material culture could and would spark social reform. From this point on, creating, designing, and molding the material culture of the Soviet Union became an important aspect of the socialist project; not only were the citizens of the Soviet Union supposed to support and adhere to the tenets of socialism but the world around them was also supposed to reflect this utopian vision. The style of one’s surroundings and the objects within these environments became representative of socialism’s successes and failures as the Eastern bloc population learned how to negotiate the everyday life of the new political reality.

Therefore, in this course we will examine anthropological approaches to material culture and consumption, identity, and everyday life in the Eastern bloc through the lens of objects. Temporally, we will begin with Stalinist Russia/post-war Stalinism (destalinization and the Thaw) and end with the collapse of the Soviet Union. Throughout the semester we will examine the role of state ideology and other institutions in the construction of the consumer and consumer culture, the role of everyday consumption in identity formation, and the function of material objects in a socialist state, and the relationship between the state and society.

This course brings together lectures and discussions of secondary readings as well as original historical documents (primary sources) and contemporary visual materials such as photographs, films, and travel posters, and even objects. In lieu of a formal mid-term or final exam students will be expected to write essays.

 

Learning Objectives:

Students will gain an understanding of the many ways that the physical environment has shaped consumer cultures in Eastern Europe and hone their oral and written skills of assessment, analysis, criticism, and reflection. Students will use the following questions to guide their readings and discussions throughout the semester.

  • Can objects be historical agents?
  • How does one study history by using objects?
  • What can objects tell us that documents cannot?
  • How do historians use objects to tell history?
  • What are the ways in which an artifact reflects a culture?
  • What are the ways in which a culture is reflected in an artifact?
  • How does material culture contribute to the formation of identity, aesthetic, and socialist consumer culture?

 

Required Readings

In addition to journal articles accessed via the University of Texas’s library databases, the following books will be required reading:

 

Slavenka Drakulic, How We Survived Communism & Even Laughed (New York: Harper

Perennial, 1993).

 

Selections from:

Paulina Bren and Mary Neuburger, eds., Communism Unwrapped: Consumption in Cold

War Eastern Europe, (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012).

 

Susan E. Reid and David Crowley, eds., Pleasures in Socialism: Leisure and Luxury in

the Eastern Bloc (Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2010).

 

Susan Reid and David Crowley, eds., Style and Socialism: Modernity and Material

Culture in Post-war Eastern Europe (Oxford, New York: Berg, 2000).

 

Grading:

10%-visual/material culture analysis presentation

10%-visual analysis (2-3 pages)

10%-class participation and attendance

10% map quiz of Eastern Europe/former Eastern bloc

20%-short essay (4-5 pages)

10%-abstract and outline of long essay

30%-one long essay (7-9 pages)

(1) Students will write one (2-3 page) analysis of a visual culture or material culture source (photographs, posters, objects etc.) and start class with a presentation on the source. The analysis is worth 20% of the final grade while the presentation is worth 10%.

  1. Presentation: This gives students opportunity to make and present connections from the previous week’s readings to the current week’s readings. This presentation should be 5-10 minutes long and students are encouraged to bring in relevant outside sources i.e. film, images, recordings, etc. to enhance the presentation. The purpose of this assignment is to spark class discussion that engages the current week’s readings and force students to seek continuities (or discontinuities) in the course material.

(2) Students will write one long essay assignment (7-9 pages--40% of the final grade--including the rough draft). Students will be required to submit an abstract and outline of this assignment (10%).

(3) One short essay (4-5 pages—20% of the final grade) on one of the essays in the assigned edited volumes that we did not cover in class. I will hand out a specific essay prompt for this assignment.

Participation in class will be assessed on the basis of attendance and active and informed participation in the discussion about the reading materials (10%). 


HIS 362G • Modern Euro Food History

38790 • Metcalfe, Robyn S.
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm GAR 1.126
show description

Why do Texans eat spicy food? Why do we eat so much BBQ? Why are sausages, kolache and sauerkraut at every farmers’ market? And how did Austin become known for its food trucks?

Answers to these questions will emerge as we explore how the history of European culture, immigration, politics and geography shape our contemporary food landscape.

In this class, you will map the areas where European immigrants settled in Texas as a result of war, famine, and political events in Europe.  You will learn how to understand Central Texan food within the context Europe’s history, beginning with the history of Dutch and Spanish explorers, and including French gastronomy, British technology, and the impacts of war and disease upon immigrant populations that moved into central Texas.  You will use primary resources, some of which are in Austin’s History Center, UT’s Harry Ransom Center, and readings posted on Canvas.

To succeed in this class you will come to class prepared to think critically about the readings. You will prepare for regular quizzes, write a mid-term paper, and research, prepare, and present a final project that may take the form ofa podcast that includes interviews of relevant people in Austin’s food scene, or a video.  Both these formats require a thesis and argument, and analysis of primary resources that are approved before producing the final project.

Class participation: 20%

Mid-term paper (800 words): 30%

Quizzes: 10%

Final Paper: 40%


HIS 362G • First World War

38795 • Villalon, Andrew
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm GAR 0.102
show description

This course will examine a traumatic conflagration at the beginning of the Twentieth Century that was once called "The Great War" or, in a more optimistic vein, "the War to End All Wars."   When it failed to achieve this noble goal and military conflict again rocked Europe during the 1940s, the earlier struggle was rechristened World War I or the First World War, names by which it has been known ever since.

 

The course will utilize lectures, readings, poetry, overheads, films, and songs to accomplish the following:

 

    *trace back into the 19th century the social,diplomatic, and military threads that ultimately combined to produce the First World War.

 

    *explore the successive crises of the early 20th century leading up to the decisive events of 1914 that set the conflict in motion.

 

    *examine in depth the course of the war, its effect upon the various participants, the evolution of military technology which it inspired, the profound social and economic changes which it wrought, and the life of the millions who were involved either on the battlefield or on the homefronts.

 

    *consider the outcome of  the war and its many serious repercussions for the history of the twentieth century.

 

Grades will be based on two examinations during the term, a non-cumulative final examination, and a short paper on a subject of the student's choosing.

 

Texts:

 

 

    CLASS NOTES (extracted from the lectures and provided on the website; they will be the principal basis of the three exams)

 

    E. M. Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front (the classic World War I novel)

 

    Robert Graves, Goodbye to All That (the most famous WW1 memoir)

 

    Select documents available on the website

 

Required Films:

 

    Paths of Glory (Kirk Douglas, Adolph Manjou)

 

Rcommended Films:

 

    Gallipoli  (Mel Gibson)

 

 

Grading:

(1)  Research Paper 

 

A course paper on some aspect of medieval war ( approximately 10 pages).  It may deal with any World War I-related topic.  This is the student's opportunity to explore in depth something that he/she has found interesting during the semester and to write a meaningful paper about it. 

 

Paper Requirements:

 

a.  All papers must be type-written, double-spaced, proof read, and contain a bibliography.

 

b.  They must be submitted in an approved three-prong folder.  (Students are not to submit three ring binders due to the weight considerations.)

 

c.  The paper must use source citations. 

 

    These should be in the style used by historians.  In other words, some variant of the system summarized in the Chicago Manual of Style, not the MLA (Modern Language Association) style that was designed for use by scholars in English and foreign languages.

 

For more information on how to use source citations, click through to the section of this website dealing with the issue entitled Footnotes for the Historian:  A Guide for the Perplexed.

 

Students may employ either footnotes or endnotes, though I strongly encourage using endnotes.

 

(2)   Submitted Source Materials

 

Along with the paper, each student should submit photocopied source materials used in preparation of his/her paper.  These should include

 

Short articles and individual primary documents, taken either from a printed source or from the web; such short items should be photocopied in their entirety and their source clearly identified.

 

If books have been used, copy the title page and the most important pages utilized by the student

 

Photocopied illustrations can also be included.

 

If the source materials do not fit into the same three-prong folder as the paper, a second folder can be used.  (Again, under no circumstances should a student utilize a three-ring binder.)

 

(3)   Two in-class examinations administered during regular class periods based on the lectures and readings

 

    The precise date of the regular examination will be announced in class at least a week in advance.

 

    Unpenalized  make-up exams will be available during the two weeks after the original exam period for students who fail to take it at that time.

 

    (See the sections of the webpage Examination Procedures and Examination Schedule).

 

(4)  A final examination during the regularly scheduled final exam period.  (Friday, May 13, 2011, 2-5 p.m.)

 

Both of the regular examinations will count for the same amount.

 

The final examination will count as much as both of the regular exams combined.

 

All examinations are entirely short answer (matching or fill-in-the-blank from a list supplied on the exam; true or false).  Scantrons will be provided.

 

The examination average will count for 2/3 of the final grade; the paper will count for 1/3.

In addition, the student should not ignore active engagement in the class.  This can take various forms:  discussion (either in class or outside of it), producing information the instructor has not mentioned, answering questions, finding and sharing relevant materials, etc.  Such participation can count in the student’s favor, though a failure to participate in this manner will not count against him/her. I am fully aware that there are many good students who prefer to listen rather than talk and, and since I admire good listeners, I will not penalize them.

Note Well:  All work must be completed and handed in to receive a grade other than X or F.  There may be some slight bending of this rule for those taking the course on a pass-fail basis, but it is up to the student to clear this with the professor early in the semester.

 

Grading Procedure:

 

The grades in this class are computed using  + and -; in other words, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, F.    Grades will not be rounded upward; in other words, a B+ is a B+, not an A-.

 


HIS 362G • Eastern Europe In 20th Cen

38796 • Nagy, Shannon
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GEA 127
(also listed as EUS 346, REE 335)
show description

This course, organized around both lectures and discussion, will deal with the major political, social, cultural events that shaped Eastern European society in the twentieth century, including contemporary Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania, ex-Yugoslavia, and Albania. The focus of the course will be on the impact of nationalism and communism on the region, that is, how these political frameworks transformed the region in the 20th century.  Opposition versus collaboration, and ethnic conflict and coexistence in East Europe will also be major themes of the course.

 

Required Texts:

Jan Gross, Neighbors.

Heda Kovaly.  Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague.

Gale Stokes. From Stalinism to Pluralism.

 

Paulina Bren, The Greengrocer and his TV: The Culture of Communism after the 1968 Prague Spring.  

Slavenka Drakulic, How We Survived Communism & Even Laughed (New York: Harper Perennial, 1993).

Perec, Georges. Things: A Story of the Sixties and A Man Asleep. Translated by David Bellos. Jaffrey, NH: David R. Godine, 1990.

  

Grading:

10%-class participation and attendance

10% map quiz of Eastern Europe/former Eastern bloc

30%-2 short essays (4-5 pages) (15% each)

10%-film review

10%-abstract and outline of long essay

30%-one long essay (8-10 pages)


HIS 362G • The Church And The Jews

38800 • Bodian, Miriam
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as EUS 346, J S 364, R S 357)
show description

This course will examine the complex relationship between the Western Church and the Jews over two millenia. It will analyze ideas and policies regarding Jews as expressed in both elite and popular culture, from theology and canon law to church art and popular preaching. It will also survey the factors which led to striking changes in attitudes and policies over time, with emphasis on the interplay of the theological legacy and evolving realities.


Texts:

Revised Standard Version of the Bible (any edition). This is available online if you don’t wish to purchase it.

The course will make used of a website designed specifically for it by the instructor. The website includes many of the readings. Other assigned readings will be posted on Canvas.

Grading:

Class attendance and participation (10%), participation on Discussion Board (20%), two 1-3 pp. assignments (20%), mid-term exam (20%), final exam (30%).


HIS 363K • Cuba In Question-Cub

38805 • Arroyo-Martínez, Jossianna
Meets
(also listed as C L 323, LAS 328, SPC 320C)
show description

Study Abroad course


HIS 363K • Latin America In The Sixties

38810 • Zazueta, Pilar
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 366)
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 


HIS 363K • Politics Of Food In Latin Amer

38820 • Zazueta, Pilar
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 366)
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 


HIS 363K • Argentina:populsm/Insurrctn

38825 • Brown, Jonathan C.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as LAS 366)
show description

This class will investigate the principal trends and issues of modern Argentine history, which has been marked by its share of social and political unrest and of economic booms and busts. Designed to provide the student with a broad knowledge of Argentina, the course devotes its attention to the period from the late nineteenth century through to the present. No doubt, students will discover that, despite sharing many trends with other Latin American nations, Argentina’s history has been unique. The principal question remains: Why has such a talented people as the Argentineans had a turbulent and violent history—including a Dirty War of the 1970s and the “disappearance” of up to 30,000 citizens?

Texts:
Federico Finchelstein, The Ideological Origins of the Dirty War in Argentina

Valeria Manzano, The Age of Youth in Argentina

Jonathan C. Brown, A Brief History of Argentina

Grading:
Each student will complete a total of five separate assignments: a map assignment, 3 four-page book essays, and a final examination. The student's final grade will be based on the total number of points that the student amasses on each of the assignments:
- map assignment 50 points or 5% of the final grade 
- 3 written book essays 600 points or 60% of the final grade
- final exam 300 points or 30% of the final grade--class attendance 50 points of 5% of final grade


HIS 364G • Big Asian Histories

38828 • Oppenheim, Robert M
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.120
(also listed as ANS 361, ANT 324L)
show description

What makes histories “big”?  The focus of this course is on world histories centrally involving Asia from the medieval period to the present.  It examines ways in which Asia and other areas of the globe have had connected intellectual, artistic, and social developments, and how Asia figured in the “rise of the West” to industrial and imperial dominance by the end of the nineteenth century.  It looks also at global histories of political forms and actions, social spaces and dynamics, and scientific theories and practices that have been exemplified through Asia—of, for instance, the interaction of nomadic and sedentary modes of life, domestic spaces, and “growth” as a ruling idea of economic planning.  Throughout the course, historiographical issues are paramount: How does one conceive of and write “connected histories”?


HIS 364G • Asian Bus/W Empire 1500-1940

38829 • Guha, Sumit
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 203
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

Asian business and Western empire c.1500-1940: Studies in global political economy

HIS 364G (38829)/ ANS 361 (30787)

Class meets MWF 11-12 AM, PAR 203

Instructor: Sumit Guha                                   Email: sguha@austin.utexas.edu

Office: GAR 2.140.                Office Hours: Wed. 2-4 PM & by appointment

 

Description: Asia has for centuries been a region characterized by a complex division of labor, a vibrant commerce and sophisticated financial and fiscal structures. But its external commerce – and for a time, even much of its modern industry was governed by Western firms. Yet its businessmen adapted and survived, developing hybrid types of organization as they adopted modern techniques. The course studies these efforts, looking at both successes and failures.

Objectives: (a) introduce students to the business history of Asia, showing one way that its peoples responded to the powerful challenge mounted by Europeans from the sixteenth to the twentieth century

(b) Study how economic organizations shape and are shaped by their social and institutional settings and

(c) Introduce key ideas that have shaped modern economic life

Grading policy:

There will be a mid-term exam (20%), two map quizzes (10%) and four class discussions (5% each) and a final exam (40%). Attendance and participation will count for 10%. Discussion sessions are intended to review and reinforce material recently covered in the class and will be the basis of questions asked in the exams.

Textbooks:

Faure, David China and Capitalism: A History of Business Enterprise in Modern China Hong Kong University Press, 2006. Hardback ISBN 978-962-209-783-4, eISBN 978-988-220-383-9 Paperback ISBN 978-962-209-784-1. Ebook available from the Press website for $12.99

Furber, Holden Rival Empires of Trade in the Orient. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press 1976. Available as e-book from UT library system. One copy held in PCL 2 hour reserve.

 


HIS 364G • Global Hong Kong

38830 • Hamilton, Peter
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as AAS 325, ANS 361)
show description

FLAGS: Cultural Diversity in the U.S., Global Cultures, and Writing

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course examines the history of Hong Kong from a global perspective, stretching from the First Opium War (1839-42) to the present day. Through lectures, discussions, films, and readings, we will foreground Hong Kong’s place on the world stage—as a trading entrepôt, a migration hub, a political sanctuary, and an economic powerhouse. We will study the evolution of the British colonial regime, the lives of diverse Hong Kong residents, and the trades and industries that have sustained the territory. We will pay keen attention to the world migrations, economic developments, and catastrophes in which Hong Kong has played an important role, such as the opium trade, the Chinese diaspora, China’s political upheavals, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, and mainland China’s post-1978 economic reform and takeoff. Finally, as the historic embarkation point and logistical nexus for Chinese migrants to the United States, Hong Kong holds a special significance for Asian American studies. Throughout the course, special attention will be paid to Hong Kong’s links with the United States.

 


HIS 364G • Precolonial India, 1200-1750

38835 • Talbot, Cynthia
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 3.116
(also listed as ANS 372)
show description

This course surveys the history of South Asia during the era prior to British colonial rule.  It begins ca. 1200 with the establishment of Muslim political power in North India and ends ca. 1750 with the emergence of British dominance in East India.  The large states which emerged in this period – the Delhi Sultanate, the Vijayanagara kingdom of South India, and the Mughal empire – incorporated  regions of South Asia that had previously been politically divided and stimulated the circulation of ideas, peoples, and goods throughout the subcontinent and beyond.  The increased scale of these political networks led to greater uniformity and communication in the society and economy of South Asia, as well as the growth of a pan-Indian elite culture.  At the same time, the diversity of South Asian culture and society increased during the timespan from 1200 to 1750, due to the influx of peoples and religions of foreign origin coming overland from Afghanistan and Persia and also overseas from Europe and elsewhere.   The roots of contemporary South Asia -– an area that is distinctly different from other parts of the world yet is also very diverse internally – thus lie in the precolonial era.

Texts:

1) C. Asher & C. Talbot, India before Europe

2) Banarsidas, Ardhakathanak: A Half Story, trans. Rohini Chowdhury

3) excerpts from The Rehla of Ibn Battuta, Hasan Sizji's Morals of the Heart, 
    Baburnama, Humayunnama, Michael Fisher's Visions of Mughal India etc.

Grading:

2 papers (4-6 pps each)= 40%

2 exams (ID & essay))= 50%

1 set of discussion questions=   5%

attendance & participation=   5%


HIS 364G • Hist Of Hindu Relig Traditn

38845 • Davis, Donald R
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 112
(also listed as ANS 340, ANT 324L, CTI 375, R S 321)
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topic titles vary.


HIS 364G • African Hist In Films & Photos

38850 • Falola, Toyin
Meets T 330pm-630pm UTC 3.122
(also listed as AFR 372G, WGS 340)
show description

Western exposure to Sub-Saharan Africa has primarily been through stylized Hollywood films which rarely speak to the historical backgrounds of past and present conflicts. These films can have detrimental effects on popular conceptions of Africa, its peoples, and its plights. Furthermore, these films can lead to an overwhelming lack of understanding for the complexities of the events in Africa’s recent history. This course seeks to increase understanding of the social, economic, and political challenges present in the past fifty years of Africa’s history through an examination of several poular films. Each film will serve a twofold purpose. First, they will act as a case study used to speak to an issue central to the history of Africa, and second, aid in dispelling many of the misconceptions present in popular portrayals of Africa. Each film will be accompanied by a text that corresponds with the respective subject matter. It is the intention of these texts to offer greater analysis and generate critical discussions of the films, their subjects, depictions of characters, and events. The ultimate goal of these discussions is to enhance students’ knowledge and perceptions of Africa, its societies, cultures, governments, and histories.

Texts:

Ukadike, N. Frank. “Western Film Images of Africa: Genealogy of an Ideological Formulation.” Black Scholar 21 n. 2 (March-May 1990): 30-48

Price, Robert M. The Apartheid State in Crisis: Political Transformation in South Africa, 1975-1990. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991.

Brantley, Cynthia. The Giriama and Colonial Resistance in Kenya, 1800-1920. Berkeley: The University of California Press, 1981.

Mamdani, Mahmod. When victims Become Killers: Colonialism, Nationalism, and the Genocide in Rwanda. Princeton Unversity Press, 2001.

Beah, Ishmael. A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007.

Grading:

Two book reviews of 4-5 pages.

Research paper of 15-20 pages.

Regular class attendance and participation.

Texts (subject to change)


HIS 364G • Apartheid: South Afr Hist

38855 • Charumbira, Ruramisai
Meets M 400pm-700pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as AFR 374C, WGS 340)
show description

This course is a study of one of the most traumatic periods in South African History. It is a study of a people’s agency and resilience in the face state sanctioned terror. With a brief detour into the deeper past of South Africa to contextualize the rise of apartheid, the course will predominantly focus on the period since 1948. We will study the social, political, economic, and cultural history of a nation in the grip of legalized oppression from the perspectives of women, children, and men - of all "racial" backgrounds - who lived through that particular period. While the course will focus on both oppression and agency, and the in-between-spaces, students are advised that some of the course content (books, audio, and video material) will include violent scenes. Such was the history of apartheid in South Africa, but overall, students will come away with a greater appreciation not only of the history of that country, but of the Southern African region, as well as the United States’ place in South African history in the period under study. Naturally, the course will not cover everything, but will aim for a deeper understanding of some of the key moments that illuminate the apartheid era as well as the postapartheid present in South Africa. This is a critical reading and writing intensive course. Those students interested in improving their writing skills will find this a rewarding course. Samukele, Kamohelo, Welcome!

Texts:

            Thompson, A History of South Africa – DT 1787 T48 2001

            Biko (and Aelred Stubbs, ed.), I Write What I Like –  DT 763 B48 1978

            First, 117 Days: An Account of Confinement…– HV 8964 A35 F5 2009 

            Ramphele, Across Boundaries: The Journey of a South African… -  DT 1949 R36 A3 1996

            Ngcobo, And They Didn't Die

            Mathabane, Kaffir Boy: An Autobiography -  E 185.97 M38 A3 1989  

            Gordimer, July’s People - PR 9369.3 G6 J8 1982  

            Coetzee, Boyhood: Scenes from a Provincial Life - PR 9369.3 C58 Z463 1997   

            Gobodo-Madikizela, A Human Being Died That Night -  HV 7911 D439 G63 2003

            Katherine S. Newman and Ariane De Lannoy, After Freedom: The Rise of the Post-Apartheid Generation in Democratic South Africa

Grading:

ϖ         20% - Attendance and Participation

ϖ         10% - Two Map Quizzes (5% each)

ϖ         50% - Journal of Reflection Essays (5% each of 10 selected weeks, 3 double-space pages)

ϖ         20% - Final Essay (10 double-space pages).


HIS 365G • Race, Law, And US Society

38857 • Thompson, Shirley E.
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CMA 3.114
(also listed as AFR 372F, AMS 370)
show description

This seminar examines the intersection of racial ideology and legal culture in the United States. We will take a broad historical approach that spans the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but we will also survey a range of contemporary sites where racial discourses permeate American law and conceptions of the rights and responsibilities of citizens. The legal construction of race in America is inextricably bound up with the development and dissolution of the institution of race-based slavery. Therefore, a consideration of laws concerning slavery, segregation, and desegregation will form the backbone of the course. We will pay special attention to Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857); Plessy v. Ferguson (1896); and Brown v. Board of Education (1954), cases that span a crucial century. By considering the long trajectories of race, law, and social transformation, we will begin to see how racial reasoning has informed many aspects of U.S. legal culture for a wide range of ethnic and social groups and how race has influenced the development of property law, family law, immigration law, and civil rights law.

This course will embrace interdisciplinary methods: we will put court cases in conversation with literature, film, social scientific writings, music, and other pertinent material. The goals of this course include 1. exploring the social and legal construction of race at various moments in American history; 2. understanding the intersection of race, gender, class, ethnicity, sexuality, and other markers of identity; 3. examining the interpenetration of law and popular cultural forms; and 4. determining how race has informed American conceptions of a wide variety of issues, such as privacy, property, citizenship, national security, and sovereignty.


HIS 365G • US/Britain/Global Order-Gbr

38860 • Lawrence, Mark Atwood
Meets
show description

THE UNITED STATES, BRITAIN, AND THE GLOBAL ORDER

Lawrence, MarkWilliam InbodenPaul Miller

Description: In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Great Britain was the world’s dominant power and chief proponent of a liberal international order.  By the middle of the twentieth century, a badly weakened Britain was mostly replaced by the United States in those roles.  But British thinking about diplomatic and military affairs exerted a strong influence on American strategy, and the two nations formed what became known as the “Special Relationship.”  This course, to be held in London as a Maymester, will explore the diplomatic and military history of the United Kingdom and Great Britain and especially how the two nations have interacted and shaped each other’s national security policies and visions of global order.  Classroom sessions will include faculty guest instructors from the renowned War Studies Department of Kings College London, and the course will be supplemented with regular field visits to historic sites in London and throughout the United Kingdom.  The group will also make a visit to the battlefields of Normandy. 

Texts:

Alan P. Dobson and Steve Marsh, editors, Anglo-American Relations:  Contemporary Perspectives (Routledge, 2013).

Walter Russell Mead, God and Gold:  Britain, America, and the Making of the Modern World (Vintage, 2008). 

David Reynolds, From World War to Cold War:  Churchill, Roosevelt, and the International History of the 1940s (Oxford University Press, 2007).

Mark A. Stoler, Allies and Adversaries:  The Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Grand Alliance, and U.S. Strategy in World War II (University of North Carolina Press, 2003).

Grading:

Active participation in seminar (40 percent of course grade); daily reading response papers (20 percent); journal of approximately 20 pages due at the end of the program (40 percent).


HIS 365G • History Of US-Mex Borderland

38870 • Alvarez, C.J.
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 1
(also listed as MAS 374)
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


HIS 365G • Women And Socl Mvmnts In US

38875 • Green, Laurie B.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 4.132
(also listed as AFR 372C, AMS 321, WGS 340)
show description

This upper-division history course examines women’s participation in both well-known and lesser-known social movements during the twentieth century, more deeply than is possible in a U.S. history survey course. Throughout, we explore women’s activism in movements that specifically targeted women’s rights, such as the woman suffrage movement. However, we also consider women’s participation in movements that do not outwardly appear to be movements about women’s rights, such as the Civil Rights Movement.

 

In addition to exploring the scope and contours of women’s activism, the course will place particular emphasis on four key themes: 1) how cultural understandings of gender may have shaped these movements, 2) tensions between ideas of women’s rights that emphasized equality of the sexes and those that emphasized difference; 3) the question of whether you can write a universal history of women or need to write separate histories along lines such as race, class, region and/or sexual preference; 4) power relations not only between men and women but among women.

 

Course Evaluation

Attendance                                                                                  5%

On-time submission of assignments                          5%

5 Lecture/Reading quizzes                                               4% each (20% total)

5 In-class essays                                                                     10% each (50% total)

Final exam                                                                                    20%

 

Possible Required Readings

SHORT READINGS will be available on Canvas.

BOOKS:

Crow Dog, Mary. Lakota Woman.  Reprint edition, Grove Press, 2011.

Moody, Anne. Coming of Age in Mississippi. 1968; reprint edition, Delta, 2004.

Orleck, Annelise. Common Sense and a Little Fire: Women and Working-Class Politics in the United States, 1900-1965. University of North Carolina Press, 1995.

Ruth Rosen. The World Split Open: How the Modern Women’s Movement Changed America. Revised edition. Penguin, 2006.

Marjorie Spruill Wheeler, One Woman, One Vote: Rediscovering the Women’s Suffrage Movement. NewSage Press, 1995.


HIS 365G • Hist Se Asian Diasp In US

38877 • Vong, Sam
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.120
(also listed as AAS 325)
show description

Which groups comprise the Southeast Asian diaspora in the United States? How has labor migration, war, and imperialism historically shaped the formation of various Southeast Asian communities in the U.S.? How does the history of a Southeast Asian diaspora in the U.S. complicate the idea of Asian America as a social project and a political critique?

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the history of Southeast Asians in the United States. Chronologically, the course will begin in 1898, with the history of U.S. empire in the Philippines, and the course will end with a discussion of the recent migration of refugees from Myanmar in Texas. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify important dates and events that have shaped Southeast Asian diasporas in the U.S. Students will also be able to define and discuss the following core concepts of the course: racial formation and racism; war and militarization; labor and class; gender; ethnicity; diaspora; and citizenship. 

This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

Texts:

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS

Bich Minh Nguyen, Stealing Buddha’s Dinner: A Memoir (New York: Penguin Books, 2007).

Lynn Fujiwara, Mothers without Citizenship: Asian Immigrant Families and the Consequences of Welfare Reform (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008).

George Herring, America’s Longest War: The United States and Vietnam, 1950-1975 (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1996 [1979].

Grading:

Attendance & participation                10%

First paper (4-page essay)                  15%

Midterm Exam                                    25%

Second paper (8-page essay)              25%

Final Exam                                          25%


HIS 366N • Humanitarianism & Human Rights

38880 • McNeil, Brian
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am GAR 1.126
show description

Human rights is perhaps the most significant concept of our time, an idea that serves as an aspiration for a better world and a call to action for bringing that world into being. Alongside humanitarianism, it calls for the breaking down of borders through universal visions of humanity and morality. Yet what is most striking is how recent the human rights program emerged and flourished on the international scene. Through lectures and weekly small group discussions, this course will explore the often interlocking yet sometimes competing histories of human rights and humanitarianism. It asks three principle questions. First, what is the historical elationship between human rights and humanitarianism? Second, how and why have human rights and the right to protect come to be seen as the dominant visions for creating a utopian present? And, finally, what is the future of human rights and humanitarianism?

Texts:

Barnett, Michael, Empire of Humanity: A History of Humanitarianism (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2013)

Laber, Jeri, The Courage of Strangers: Coming of Age with the Human Rights Movement (New York: Public Affairs, 2002)

Moyn, Samuel, The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 2012)

Rieff, David, At the Point of a Gun: Democratic Dreams and Armed Intervention (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2005).

Grading:

Exams 50%

Research Paper 30%

Participation 20%


HIS 375L • Stuart England, 1603-1689

38885 • Levack, Brian P.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as EUS 346)
show description

This lecture course explores the most significant political, religious, social, economic and cultural developments in seventeenth-century England. The unifying theme of the course is the problem of revolution, and the lectures investigate the causes, nature, and development of the two revolutions of the seventeenth century—the Puritan Revolution of the 1640s and the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89. The lectures are topical and therefore do not follow a strict chronological order.

Texts:

Roger Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain (3rd ed., 2005)

William Hunt, The Puritan Moment: The Coming of Revolution in an English County  (1983)  [Xerox at Jenn’s]

Brian Levack, Witch-Hunting in Scotland (208)

Barry Coward, Oliver Cromwell  (1991)

Peter Laslett (ed.), John Locke's Two Treatises of Government (2nd ed., 1989)

Grading:

Three exams (75%) and a final essay (25%)


HIS 376F • The US And Second World War

38890 • Stoff, Michael B.
Meets WF 930am-1100am GAR 0.132
show description

This course fulfills part of the requirements for the Normandy Scholars Program as well as part of the American history requirement for the University.  It explores American involvement in the Second World War.  Among the topics covered are: American isolationism; the controversy over Pearl Harbor and American entry into the war; the rise of air power and strategic bombing; the conduct of war and diplomacy; everyday life and politics on the home front; the experience of battle; the use of the atomic bomb; the seeds of the Cold War; and conflicting visions of the postwar world

No course can be encyclopedic.  This one will divide its time between events in Europe and the Pacific without trying to cover either theater in all its detail.  Two events, one in each theater, will serve as case studies for in-depth analysis: 1) the D-Day invasion and the opening of the “Second Front” in Europe; and 2) the atomic bombs and the surrender of Japan in the Pacific.

 

Texts:

David Kennedy, The American People in World War II

E. B. Sledge, With the Old Breed

John W. Dower, War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War

Michael B. Stoff et al., eds., The Manhattan Project: A Documentary Introduction

to the Atomic Age

Cornelius Ryan, The Longest Day

John Hersey, A Bell for Adano

 

Grading:

Class work consists of lectures and discussions of weekly reading assignments, lectures, and films.  Discussions constitute 20 percent of the course grade.  Five in-class quizzes based on lectures and readings make up another 20 percent of the grade.  A research paper, done in three stages, serves as the written portion of the workload and is worth 50 percent of the course grade.  Each student will also present his or her work orally.  The oral presentation is worth 10 percent of the grade.


HIS 376G • Hitler/Nazism/World War II-Hon

38895 • Crew, David
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 0.128
show description

How was an obscure, unemployed Austrian, who never rose above the rank of corporal in the German army, able to become the leader of a mass political movement which overthrew the most democratic political system Germany had ever known? Why did Germany begin the most devastating and brutal war in world history just two decades after having lost the First World War? Why did the Nazi state systematically murder 6 million Jews? How did the implementation of Nazi plans for a “racial empire” affect the lives of millions of Europeans during the Second World War? And what is the legacy of the Third Reich, for Germany today? These are the primary questions addressed by this course.

Texts:

Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front

David F. Crew, Hitler and the Nazis. A History in Documents (New York: Oxford University Press, 2005)[also available on-line at the PCL as an e-book]

J. Noakes and G. Pridham(editors), Nazism. A History in Documents and Eyewitness Accounts, 1919-1945 (University of Exeter Press Edition: Volumes 2 &3)

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz

We are also going to be working with the images at these two web-sites: http://germanhistorydocs.ghi-dc.org/ and http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/

Grading:

A distinctive feature of this course is the fact that we will be working extensively with original documents, in translation. This will give you a more direct and immediate connection to the past, will allow you to experience, at first hand, the language and ideas of the period. It will also allow you to engage directly in the process of interpretation. Rather than simply ingesting the arguments of historians who write about the Nazi period, you  will have the opportunity to analyze the "raw materials" with which historians themselves work. The first and second document essays will ask you to comment on the meaning and significance of several documents(or parts of documents) assigned for the class. You will be given a copy of the document(s) which will be clearly identified for you (i.e. author, date, place). These are, therefore, not identification quizzes; your job is rather to write an essay in which you show why the particular documents are important in terms of the larger history of the period from which they derive and what they tell us about that particular phase in the rise or development of Nazism.

            Your general participation in class discussions (i.e. attendance + involvement) counts for 20% of the overall grade. There will be a take-home mid-term document essay (5-6 pages, 20% of the final grade).There is no final exam per se but you will have a second take-home document essay (5-6 pages, 20% of the final grade). You will also be asked to write one short essay on any one of the books by Remarque or Levi (4-5 pages, 20% of final grade). Finally, you will be asked to write two  brief (2-3 page) analyses of the visual evidence(photographs, propaganda, election posters, etc.) discussed in class and/or those that are available on the web-sites listed above. Each of these two assignments is worth 10% of the final grade. I will be using the full range of +/- grades.