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Charles R. Hale, Director SRH 1.310, 2300 Red River Street D0800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512.471.5551
Mexico 2010

This year Mexico marks two important anniversaries: the bicentennial of its independence from Spain in 1810 and the centennial of the Mexican Revolution in 1910.

The fight for Mexico’s independence began with a call to arms by the priest Miguel Hidalgo in the early morning of September 16, 1810. Ever since, Mexicans have commemorated the date with gatherings in plazas and zócalos throughout the country, reenacting Hidalgo’s original cry. Mexico and other Latin American countries declared their independence during this period, ushering in an era of reforms as the continent broke away from the control of Spain.

The Mexican Revolution started on November 20, 1910, when farmers, workers, and the disaffected professional class rebelled against the repressive regime of Porfirio Díaz, a government in decay after more than thirty years of rule. The ensuing armed conflict and social upheaval would last for another ten years and would profoundly change the political, social, and economic landscape of Mexico.

The Mexican Center of the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS) and other organizations on campus will commemorate these seminal dates with the following events. Please check back regularly for updates or contact the Mexican Center at <mexctr@uts.cc.utexas.edu> or 512.232.2423 for more information.

A special thanks to the Consulate General of Mexico in Austin for its support of these programs. Thanks also to Michael Hironymous, Benson Latin American Collection, and Kent Norsworthy, LANIC Content Director, for assistance with the Web site.

Schedule of Events:

Many Mexicos, 1810–2010: Reflections on Independence, Revolution, and the Making of Modern Mexico
January–November 2010
An
international group of scholars will address key topics related to economic development, independence and nation-state formation, religion, indigenous peoples, and the politics of commemoration in Mexico from multiple perspectives. Cosponsored by the Consulate General of Mexico in Austin, the Mexican Center of LLILAS, the UT Department of History, and CIESAS (Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, Mexico).

Many Mexicos: The Economic Consequences of Mexican Independence and the Mexican Revolution
Friday, January 29, 2010
Eastwoods Room, Texas Union 2.102, 12:00–1:30
p.m.
A roundtable featuring Enrique Cárdenas, Centro de Estudios Espinosa Yglesias, Mexico City; and John Tutino, Georgetown University. Jonathan Brown, UT Department of History, will moderate.

Invitation to 1910 Centennial Diplomatic Reception

Foodways of Mexico: Transplanted Cuisines: Migrants in the Making of Mexican Cuisine
Thursday, February 18, 2010
Long Center for the Performing Arts, Downtown Austin, 6:00–7:00
p.m.
Reception to follow: 7:00–7:30
p.m.
Rachel Laudan, a British food historian who has lived for many years in Guanajuato, has written and spoken in depth about the colonial legacy of Mexican food. She will examine the contribution that disparate migrant communities—including Lebanese, French, and Asian—have made to Mexican cooking. The series
Foodways of Mexico: Past, Present, and Futureexplores lesser known aspects of Mexico’s rich culinary history and is organized by Austin food writer Claudia Alarcón.

Many Mexicos: 2010 Keynote Address by Soledad Loaeza: Too Close for Conflict: Mexico—The Politics of Accommodation to the Superpower
Friday, February 26, 2010
Eastwoods Room, UNB 2.102

Noted Mexican political scientist Soledad Loaeza of El Colegio de Mexico, Mexico City, will explore the historical impact of the United States on institutional development in Mexico.

Many Mexicos: Actualidad del pasado: Reflexiones sobre doscientos años de cambios y costumbres políticas de México
Address by Héctor Aguilar Camín [in Spanish, simultaneous translation provided]
Thursday, March 25, 2010
Sinclair Suite, UNB 3.128, 4:00–5:30 p.m.
Reception to follow: 5:30–6:00 p.m., Texas Governors' Room, UNB 3.116
Mexican historian, author, and journalist Héctor Aguilar Camín will speak on the events of 1810 and 1910.

Soldaderas

Many Mexicos: Independence, Revolution, and Nation-State Formation in Mexico
Wednesday, April 14, 2010
Sinclair Suite, Texas Union 3.128, 3:30–5:30
p.m.
Reception to follow: Texas Governors’ Room, Texas Union 3.116, 5:30–6:30
p.m.
A symposium featuring Mexicanist scholars Alan Knight, University of Oxford; Erika Pani, El Colegio de México, Mexico City; and Eric Van Young, University of California, San Diego. Susan Deans-Smith, UT Department of History, will moderate.

Foodways of Mexico: Unknown Gastronomy of Mexico
Thursday, April 29, 2010
Blanton Auditorium, 6:00–7:00
p.m.
Reception to follow: 7:00–7:30
p.m.
Famed cookbook author Diana Kennedy will explore the dishes and recipes of Mexico handed down within families from generation to generation, but rarely printed or published. Copresented with the Blanton Museum of Art.

Execution of Miguel Hidalgo

Texas and the Mexican Independence Movement
Wednesday, May 5, 2010
Mexican American Cultural Center, 600 River Street, Austin, 512.478.6222

A panel examining the importance of Mexican independence in the history of Texas. Features Andrés Tijerina, Austin Community College; Martha Cotera, Austin; and Emilio Zamora, UT Department of History. Moderated by Jesús de la Teja, Texas State University. Cosponsored by the Center for Mexican American Studies.

Iglesia de la Virgen Milagrosa, Mexico City, by architect Félix Candela

Foodways of Mexico: The Culinary Birth of a Nation: Gastronomy and the Making of Mexican Identity
Thursday, September 9, 2010
Auditorium, Mexican American Cultural Center, 6:00–7:00 p.m.
Reception to follow: 7:00–7:30 p.m.

Iliana de la Vega, chef and restaurant owner from Oaxaca, will explore watershet moments in Mexican gastronomy during the Colonial, Independence, and Revolutionary periods that solidified the Mexican culinary identity.

Many Mexicos: Religion, Independence, and Revolution
Tuesday, September 28, 2010
Eastwoods Room, Texas Union 2.102, 3:30–5:30 p.m.
Reception to follow: Texas Governors' Room, Texas Union 3.116, 5:30–6:30 p.m.

A panel examining the role that religion played in the seminal events of 1810 and 1910. Features Roberto Blancarte, El Colegio de México; Brian Connaughton, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Mexico City; and Manuel Ceballos, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Nuevo Laredo. Matthew Butler, UT Department of History, will moderate.

Many Mexicos: What’s Mexican about Mexican Independence? A Comparative Assessment of the Latin American Independence Movements
Tuesday, October 12, 2010
Santa Rita Room, Texas Union 3.502, 3:30–5:30 p.m.
Reception to follow: Santa Rita Room, Texas Union 3.502, 5:30–6:30 p.m.

A panel featuring Roberto Breña, El Colegio de México; Karen Racine, University of Guelph, Canada; and Nicolas Shumway, Rice University. Focuses on the distinctiveness of the Mexican independence movement and how it compares to the search for independence that occurred during the same period in other regions of Latin America. Susan Deans-Smith, UT Department of History, will moderate.

Bacardi Bottling Plant, Mexico City-Querétaro highway, by architect Félix Candela

Many Mexicos: Architecture and Identity After Independence
Wednesday, October 20, 2010
Goldsmith Hall 3.120, 5:00-6:15 p.m.
Juan Miró, UT School of Architecture and principal of Austin-based Miró Rivera Architects, explores architecture in Mexico during independence and the Revolution and the impact of these historical events on contemporary Mexican architecture.

Foodways of Mexico: Planet Taco: The Globalization of Mexican Cuisine
November 2010
Jeffrey Pilcher, University of Minnesota, will speak about the history of the taco, the spread of Mexican food around the world, and the images of Mexicans it has carried with it.

Portrait of Emiliano Zapata by Diego Rivera

Other 2010 Events at UT Austin:
¡
Viva! Mexico’s Independence
February 9–August 1, 2010
Harry Ransom Center

The Ransom Center will display original materials from its collections that illuminate the historic touchstones of 1810 and 1910.
Sponsored by the Harry Ransom Center, Graduate Studies, and the Consulate General of Mexico in Austin.

Manuel Álvarez Bravo and His Contemporaries: Photographs from the Collections of the Harry Ransom Center and The Blanton Museum of Art
March 20–August 1, 2010
The Blanton Museum of Art

An exhibition featuring forty-five iconic images of Mexico in the frist half of the 20th century. Commonly referred to as the father of Mexican photography, Manuel Álvarez Bravo is considered one of the most important figures in the development of modernism in Mexico. The exhibition will also include photographs by Bravo's contemporaries Edward Weston, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Paul Strand, and others, drawn from the collections of The Blanton and the Harry Ransom Center. Sponsored by The Blanton Museum of Art.

Agustín Iturbide and his contemporaries

For a listing of Austin-wide events celebrating 2010, visit the Mexico 2010 site of the Austin Bicentennial Committee.

Official 2010 site of Mexico

To volunteer for the above events or to submit an event, please contact the Mexican Center (tel: 512.232.2423).



Photo Credits (in order of appearance, from top to bottom)

Invitation to 1910 Centennial Diplomatic Reception, Mexican Ministry of Foreign Relations, Genaro García Imprints: Courtesy Benson Latin American Collection

Soldaderas, María Elena Martínez Collection: Courtesy Benson Latin American Collection

Capture of Miguel Hidalgo, Genaro García Imprints: Courtesy Benson Latin American Collection

Portrait of Emiliano Zapata by Diego Rivera, From Diego Rivera: Gran Ilustrador by Raquel Tibol: Courtesy Benson Latin American Collection

Iglesia de la Virgen Milagrosa, Mexico City, by architect Félix Candela. Photo credit: Juan Miró

Bacardi Bottling Plant, Mexico City-Querétaro highway, by architect Félix Candela. Photo credit: Juan Miró

Agustín Iturbide and his contemporaries, Genaro García Imprints: Courtesy Benson Latin American Collection


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