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Charles R. Hale, Director SRH 1.310, 2300 Red River Street D0800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512.471.5551

Javier Auyero

Professor Ph.D., The New School for Social Research

Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Endowed Professor in Latin American Sociology, Department of Sociology
Javier Auyero

Contact

Interests

political ethnography; urban poverty and social inequality; collective action; social and cultural theory

LAS 325 • Polit & Society In Latin Amer

40215 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 116
(also listed as SOC 321K )
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Description: 

This course provides a broad introduction to present-day Latin American politics and society. During the semester, we will focus on drug-trafficking and urban destitution in Brazil and Mexico, party politics, collective action, and environmental suffering in Argentina, the current political situation in Chavez’s Venezuela, and migration from Central American and the Caribbean to the United States. In each case, we will study what is specific to the national histories of each country and what can be analyzed as common to the history and present reality of the sub-continent.   

 Texts:

Robert Gay. Lucia. Testimonies of a Brazilian Drug Dealer’s Woman

Javier Auyero. Routine Politics and Collective Violence

Javier Auyero and Debora Swistun. Flammable. Environmental Suffering in an Argentine Shantytown.  

 Course Requirements:

Since the class is organized around lectures, discussions of the required readings, group presentations, and films ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.There will be FIVE quizzes (10 questions each) on the assigned readings. Dropping your lowest score, the sum of the remaining FOUR stands for 50% of your final grade. There will also be a final exam (10 page paper). Note on grades: If your final grade (addition of FOUR best quizzes and final) is: 100-93, then your grade is an A; 92-90, then your grade is an A --; 89-85 then you grade is a B +; 84-80 then your grade is a B; 79-76 then your grade is a C; 75-65 then your grade is a D; 64 or below is an F.50% of your grade: Best four of five quizzes50% of your grade: Final examYou can earn extra-credit by doing oral presentations on assigned readings  

LAS 325 • Polit & Society In Latin Amer

40205 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 216
(also listed as SOC 321K )
show description

Description: 

This course provides a broad introduction to present-day Latin American politics and society. During the semester, we will focus on drug-trafficking and urban destitution in Brazil and Mexico, party politics, collective action, and environmental suffering in Argentina, the current political situation in Chavez’s Venezuela, and migration from Central American and the Caribbean to the United States. In each case, we will study what is specific to the national histories of each country and what can be analyzed as common to the history and present reality of the sub-continent.   

 Texts:

Robert Gay. Lucia. Testimonies of a Brazilian Drug Dealer’s WomanJavier Auyero. Routine Politics and Collective ViolenceJavier Auyero and Debora Swistun. Flammable. Environmental Suffering in an Argentine Shantytown.  

 Course Requirements:

Since the class is organized around lectures, discussions of the required readings, group presentations, and films ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.There will be FIVE quizzes (10 questions each) on the assigned readings. Dropping your lowest score, the sum of the remaining FOUR stands for 50% of your final grade. There will also be a final exam (10 page paper). Note on grades: If your final grade (addition of FOUR best quizzes and final) is: 100-93, then your grade is an A; 92-90, then your grade is an A --; 89-85 then you grade is a B +; 84-80 then your grade is a B; 79-76 then your grade is a C; 75-65 then your grade is a D; 64 or below is an F.50% of your grade: Best four of five quizzes50% of your grade: Final examYou can earn extra-credit by doing oral presentations on assigned readings  

LAS 381 • Poverty/Marginality In The Ams

40426 • Spring 2012
Meets W 1200pm-300pm BUR 231
(also listed as SOC 395D )
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This reading-intensive course is devoted to review past and present ethnographic analyses of the nature and experiences of poverty and marginality in Latin America and in the United States, to examine some of the most controversial issues and debates, and to explore the emerging research topics north and south of the border. 

LAS 325 • Polit & Society In Latin Amer

40140 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 203
(also listed as SOC 321K )
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Meets with LAS 325/40120

Description: 

This course provides a broad introduction to present-day Latin American politics and society. During the semester, we will focus on drug-trafficking and urban destitution in Brazil and Mexico, party politics, collective action, and environmental suffering in Argentina, the current political situation in Chavez’s Venezuela, and migration from Central American and the Caribbean to the United States. In each case, we will study what is specific to the national histories of each country and what can be analyzed as common to the history and present reality of the sub-continent.   

 

Texts:

Robert Gay. Lucia. Testimonies of a Brazilian Drug Dealer’s WomanJavier Auyero. Routine Politics and Collective ViolenceJavier Auyero and Debora Swistun. Flammable. Environmental Suffering in an Argentine Shantytown.  

 

Course Requirements:

 Since the class is organized around lectures, discussions of the required readings, group presentations, and films ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.There will be FIVE quizzes (10 questions each) on the assigned readings. Dropping your lowest score, the sum of the remaining FOUR stands for 50% of your final grade. There will also be a final exam (10 page paper). Note on grades: If your final grade (addition of FOUR best quizzes and final) is: 100-93, then your grade is an A; 92-90, then your grade is an A --; 89-85 then you grade is a B +; 84-80 then your grade is a B; 79-76 then your grade is a C; 75-65 then your grade is a D; 64 or below is an F.50% of your grade: Best four of five quizzes50% of your grade: Final examYou can earn extra-credit by doing oral presentations on assigned readings  

LAS 325 • Polit & Society In Latin Amer

40120 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 203
(also listed as SOC 321K )
show description

Meets with LAS 325/40120

 

This course provides a broad introduction to present-day Latin American politics and society. During the semester, we will focus on drug-trafficking and urban destitution in Brazil and Mexico, party politics, collective action, and environmental suffering in Argentina, the current political situation in Chavez’s Venezuela, and migration from Central American and the Caribbean to the United States. In each case, we will study what is specific to the national histories of each country and what can be analyzed as common to the history and present reality of the sub-continent.
 
 
 
Required Books:
 
Robert Gay. Lucia. Testimonies of a Brazilian Drug Dealer’s Woman
Javier Auyero. Routine Politics and Collective Violence
Javier Auyero and Debora Swistun. Flammable. Environmental Suffering in an Argentine Shantytown.
 
 
Course Requirements:
 
Since the class is organized around lectures, discussions of the required readings, group presentations, and films ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.
There will be FIVE quizzes (10 questions each) on the assigned readings. Dropping your lowest score, the sum of the remaining FOUR stands for 50% of your final grade. There will also be a final exam (10 page paper). Note on grades: If your final grade (addition of FOUR best quizzes and final) is: 100-93, then your grade is an A; 92-90, then your grade is an A --; 89-85 then you grade is a B +; 84-80 then your grade is a B; 79-76 then your grade is a C; 75-65 then your grade is a D; 64 or below is an F.
50% of your grade: Best four of five quizzes
50% of your grade: Final exam
You can earn extra-credit by doing oral presentations on assigned readings
 
 

LAS 381 • Sociology Of Domination

41047 • Fall 2009
Meets T 300pm-600pm BUR 231
(also listed as SOC 394K )
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Sociology of Domination

Javier Auyero

FALL 2009 Tuesdays 3 PM – 6 PM

 

Power and domination are terms frequently used in sociological research but their very definition remains controversial in social theory. This seminar seeks to examine various (both classical and contemporary) theoretical understandings of power and domination and to study diverse ways in which these concepts have been deployed in empirical research. The seminar is opened to beginning and advanced graduate students.

 

FORM

 

The course follows a mixed lecture-seminar format, combining formal presentations, short lectures, and group discussion. The requirements are threefold:

1.  Weekly electronic reading notes: every Tuesday before 9 AM, participants will submit reading notes (1 single space page maximum) to the instructor and to each other by e-mail. These notes should include: a brief summary of the main points of the readings; a couple of paragraphs outlining possible connections between the assigned readings; a paragraph of questions/topics you would like to discuss in class

2.  Active participation in class discussions, including two short oral presentations on a given set of readings. Presentations should be done in groups of two.

3.  A term paper of no more than 15 pages. The paper can criticize and contrast two or more of the authors studied, deploy their ideas in the course of an empirical research, etc. Term paper topics should be submitted for approval by the instructor by week 9 (one page abstract).

 

SCHEDULE (readings mark with * will be on blackboard)

 

Week One:

Kafka, F. The Trial.

Lukes, S. Power. A Radical View. Second Edition.

 

Week Two:

* M. Weber, The Types of Legitimate Domination in Economy and Society (pp. 212-246). 

* K. Marx, Section IV, Chapter I, “The Fetishism of Commodities and the Secrete Thereof,” in Capital, “Theses on Feuerbach,” The German Ideology, Part I, [Tucker, R. The Marx-Engels Reader pp. 143-200]

 

Week Three:

*M. Horkheimer and T. Adorno, “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception” in Dialectic of Enlightenment

* H. Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism (Chapter 12, pp.437-459).

* L. Althusser, “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses,” in Lenin and Philosophy

 

Week Four:

* R. Williams, Part II “Hegemony,” in Marxism and Literature.

M. Burawoy. Manufacturing Consent.

 

RECOMMENDED:

A.Gramsci,  Prison Notebooks [5-14; 125-239]

E.P. Thompson, “Introduction: Custom and Culture,” “The Moral Economy of the English Crowd in the Eighteenth Century,” “Time, Work-Discipline and Industrial Capitalism,” in Customs in Common. S. Hall “Cultural Studies: Two Paradigms.”

J. Gaventa, Power and Powerlessness. Quiescence and Rebellion in an Appalachian Valley. 

 

Week Five:

M. Foucault, Selections from Discipline and Punish (pp. 3-31, 135-228, 231-256) . Selections from Power/Knowledge (“Two Lectures,” “Truth and Power”).

* D. Kirk, Schooling Bodies. School Practice and Public Discourse 1880-1950 (pp. 5-65).

 

RECOMMENDED:

S. Hays, Flat Broke with Children. Women in the Age of Welfare Reform.

J. Gilliom, Overseers of the Poor. Surveillance, Resistance, and the Limits of Privacy.

 

Week Six:

* M. Foucault, “Governmentality,” in The Foucault Effect.

A. Petryna Life Exposed. Biological Citizens after Chernobyl.

 

Week Seven:

P. Bourdieu and L. Wacquant,  An Introduction to Reflexive Sociology (pp. 1-59)

*P. Bourdieu The State Nobility (Foreword and pp. 1-53).

P. Bourdieu. Language and Symbolic Power (Editor’s Introduction, Chapters 1, 3, and 5).

 

RECOMMENDED:

P. Bourdieu and J.C. Passeron, Reproduction

McLeod, J. Ain’t No Making It.

Willi,s, P. Learning to Labor.

 

Week Eight:

P. Bourdieu. The Logic of Practice (pp.1-65).

* L. Wacquant,  “Pugs at Work: Bodily Capital and Bodily Labour Among Professional Boxers,” * “The Pugilistic Point of View. How boxers think and feel about their trade,” * “A Fleshpedler at Work.” Alford and A. Szanto “Orpheus Wounded: The experience of pain in the

professional worlds of the piano” *

 

RECOMMENDED:

L. Wacquant. Body and Soul.

 

Week Nine:

P. Bourdieu, Masculine Domination

N. Chodorow, The Reproduction of Mothering

GUEST: Christine Williams

 

RECOMMENDED:

J. Benjamin, Bonds of Love

 

Week Ten:

P. Bourgois and J. Schonberg, Righteous Dopefiend
* T. Gowan “The Nexus: Homelessness and Incarceration in Two American Cities.”

 

Week Eleven: 

J. Auyero & D. Swistun. Flammable. Environmental Suffering in an Argentine Shantytown.

G. García Marquez. No One Writes to the Colonel.

 

Week Twelve:

* M. Comfort “Papa’s House: The Prison as Domestic and Social Satellite”

L. Wacquant, Selections from Punishing the Poor

 

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