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Charles R. Hale, Director SRH 1.310, 2300 Red River Street D0800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512.471.5551

Ann Twinam

Professor Ph.D., Yale University

Professor, Department of History
Ann Twinam

Contact

Interests

colonial history; family history; women and gender; sexuality and illegitmacy in the 15th- through 18th-centuries

LAS 386 • Latin American Colonial Hist

40778 • Fall 2014
Meets W 300pm-600pm CAL 22
(also listed as HIS 386L )
show description

The goal of this course is for students to write a publishable research paper.  While the seminar will focus on the colonial era, students may write essays on any period.  During the first weeks, the seminar will discuss strategies to analyze archival indices and explore archives, the organization of research materials and the analysis of colonial documents.  The seminar will read archival documents, and learn and practice fundamentals of paleography.  Each student will write a competitive research proposal on their chosen paper topic, which the seminar will evaluate.  During the middle weeks of the seminar students will meet one-on-one with the professor to discuss progress in research and writing.  In the final week  each student will report on the status of their paper.

Students should attend every class, participate in assignments and discussion, and keep assigned meetings with the professor. The professor may lessen the final course grade  if such requirements are not met.  Normally,  the grade assigned the research paper will be the final grade.  Reading knowledge of spanish is required.

Texts:

Readings:  as posted on blackboard or xerox handouts.  I am keeping the class readings to a minimum as i want you to have the most time possible to work on your research project.

LAS 310 • Film/Hist In Lat Amer: Modern

40795 • Spring 2014
Meets W 300pm-600pm WEL 2.312
(also listed as HIS 306N )
show description

This course introduces students to selected topics in Latin American history and culture through film, readings, documentaries, class discussion and lectures.  One goal is to explore significant influences that have molded Latin American history from the conquest through the early twentieth century.  Another is for students to develop their analytical capabilities to utilize both visual and written materials as they engage in discussion, write analytical essays, and prepare individual projects. Topics include but are not limited to: The Mexican Revolution; Borders between Central America, Mexico, The US; The Argentine Dirty War, The Cuban Revolution.

Texts:

Donald Stevens, Based on a True Story: Latin American History at the Movies, Scholarly Resources, 1998.

Other readings will be posted on Blackboard.

Grading:

Essays            6/9  (67%)

Outlines          1/9  (11%)

Discussion      2/9  (22%)

LAS 386 • Latin American Colonial Hist

41165 • Spring 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as HIS 386L )
show description

The goal of this course is for students to write a publishable research paper.  While the seminar will focus on the colonial era, students may write essays on any period.  During the first weeks, the seminar will discuss strategies to analyze archival indices and explore archives, the organization of research materials and the analysis of colonial documents.  The seminar will read archival documents, and learn and practice fundamentals of paleography.  Each student will write a competitive research proposal on their chosen paper topic, which the seminar will evaluate.  During the middle weeks of the seminar students will meet one-on-one with the professor to discuss progress in research and writing.  In the final week  each student will report on the status of their paper.

 

Students should attend every class, participate in assignments and discussion, and keep assigned meetings with the professor. The professor may lessen the final course grade  if such requirements are not met.  Normally,  the grade assigned the research paper will be the final grade.  Reading knowledge of spanish is required.

 

Readings:  as posted on blackboard or xerox handouts.  I am keeping the class readings to a minimum as i want you to have the most time possible to work on your research project.

LAS 310 • Film/Hist In Lat Am: Colonial

40725 • Fall 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 116
(also listed as HIS 306N )
show description

This course introduces students to selected topics in Latin American history and culture through film, readings, documentaries, class discussion and lectures.  One goal is to explore significant influences that have molded Latin American history from the conquest through the early twentieth century.  Another is for students to develop their analytical capabilities to utilize both visual and written materials as they engage in discussion, write analytical essays, and prepare individual projects.

Texts:

Donald Stevens, Based on a True Story: Latin American History at the Movies, Scholarly Resources, 1998.

Other readings will be posted on Blackboard.

Grading:

Essays            6/9  (67%)

Outlines          1/9  (11%)

Discussion      2/9  (22%)

 

LAS 366 • Colonial Latin America

40835 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WEL 2.308
(also listed as HIS 346K )
show description

This course surveys the history of colonial Spanish America from first encounters to independence. An underlying focus will be to explore the dynamics of scholarly analysis, tracing how and why historians and social scientists have revisited and provided alternative (revisionist) interpretations of key themes. These include: the arrival of humans in the Americas, alternations in the pre and post contact indigenous (Maya, Aztec, Inca) and Iberian worlds, processes of conquest and early colonization, ecological and demographic trends, the consolidation of imperial power (governmental, economic, religious and social institutions), changing dynamics of gender, race and class; the Bourbon Reforms; and precipitating variables for independence.

Texts:

Bernal Diaz del Castillo, The Conquest of New Spain (Penguin 1963)

Richard Boyer, Colonial Lives: Documents in Latin American History 1550-1850 (Oxford University Press 2000).

Camilla Townsend, Malintzin’s  Choices:  An Indian Woman in the Conquest of Mexico (University of New Mexico Press 2006)

Grading:

Students must pass a map quiz to receive a grade in the course. There will be a midterm and a final examination. Study sheets will be handed out a week prior to each examination and there will be a review in class of the materials to be covered.  Students should be prepared to discuss the assigned readings in class as well as show their comprehension of the material in examinations and essays.  Additionally students will write one (4-5) page essay based on the Boyer readings.   A sheet will be handed out suggesting possible topics or students may develop their own topic with the approval of the professor. Each examination and writing assignment will count equally in assigning a final grade. From time to time students may be presented with opportunities for extra credit through attendance at scholarly presentations or Internet assignments.  A brief outline of the lecture topics as well as terms and concepts to know will be handed out prior to each topical segment and will be posted on Blackboard.

LAS 366 • Colonial Latin America

40425 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CAL 100
(also listed as HIS 346K )
show description

Topics vary each semester to allow curriculum flexibility for faculty members and visiting scholars.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

LAS 366 • History Of The Caribbean

40290 • Fall 2012
Meets W 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.118
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

Course Description

This course provides uses documentaries, film, lectures and readings to provide an overview of caribbean history from 1492 to the present.  The prominent theme will be to explore how the dynamic among differing conquerors, natives, and slaves forged the distinctive caribbean nations of the present with their spanish, british, french, dutch, danish and united states cultural heritages.  The focus throughout will be to measure the extent to which these distinctive cultural and colonial heritages shaped historical development.  Topical themes include: contact between european and native cultures, piracy, the impact of sugar and slavery, colonialism, de-colonization, the impact of the U.S. as a caribbean power (puerto rico, virgin islands), caribbean revolutions (cuba, grenada), the caribbean in the twenty-first century.

Grading Policy

 

Essays          9/15

Discussion  3/15

Mini-assignments  1/15

Individual project 2/15

 

 

Texts.

Each week 50-100 pp of primary and secondary source readings will be posted on blackboard.

 

 

 

LAS 366 • Colonial Latin America

40265 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 201
(also listed as HIS 346K )
show description

This course surveys the history of colonial Spanish America from first encounters to independence. An underlying focus will be to explore the dynamics of scholarly analysis, tracing how and why historians and social scientists have revisited and provided alternative (revisionist) interpretations of key themes. These include: the arrival of humans in the Americas, alternations in the pre and post contact indigenous (Maya, Aztec, Inca) and Iberian worlds, processes of conquest and early colonization, ecological and demographic trends, the consolidation of imperial power (governmental, economic, religious and social institutions), changing dynamics of gender, race and class; the Bourbon Reforms; and precipitating variables for independence.

 

TEXTS 

Required: 

Bernal Diaz del Castillo, The Conquest of New Spain (Penguin 1963)  (BD)

Richard Boyer, Colonial Lives: Documents in Latin American History 1550-1850 (Oxford University Press 2000). (B)

Camilla Townsend, Malintzin’s  Choices:  An Indian Woman in the Conquest of Mexico (University of New Mexico Press 2006) (CT)

 

CLASS REQUIREMENTS

         Students must pass a map quiz to receive a grade in the course. There will be a midterm and a final examination. Study sheets will be handed out a week prior to each examination and there will be a review in class of the materials to be covered.  Students should be prepared to discuss the assigned readings in class as well as show their comprehension of the material in examinations and essays.  Additionally students will write one (4-5) page essay based on the Boyer readings.   A sheet will be handed out suggesting possible topics or students may develop their own topic with the approval of the professor. Each examination and writing assignment will count equally in assigning a final grade. From time to time students may be presented with opportunities for extra credit through attendance at scholarly presentations or Internet assignments.  A brief outline of the lecture topics as well as terms and concepts to know will be handed out prior to each topical segment and will be posted on Blackboard. 

LAS 386 • Latin American Colonial Hist

40460 • Spring 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as HIS 386L )
show description

The goal of this course is for students to write a publishable research paper.  While the seminar will focus on the colonial era, students may write essays on any period.  During the first weeks, the seminar will discuss strategies to analyze archival indices and explore archives, the organization of research materials and the analysis of colonial documents.  The seminar will read archival documents, and learn and practice fundamentals of paleography.  

Texts

Readings will be posted on blackboard or xerox handouts

Grading

Each student will write a competitive research proposal on their chosen paper topic, which the seminar will evaluate.  During the middle weeks of the seminar students will meet one-on-one with the professor to discuss progress in research and writing.  For the final weeks, the seminar will convene as a scholarly conference and each student will deliver a paper on his or her topic.  Students will share and comment on the full text of their papers. 

Students should attend every class, participate in assignments and discussion, and keep assigned meetings with the professor.  The professor may lessen the final course grade if such requirements are not met.  Normally, the grade assigned the research paper will be the final grade.

LAS 310 • Film/Hist In Lat Am: Colonial

40105 • Fall 2011
Meets M 330pm-630pm BUR 116
(also listed as HIS 306N )
show description

This course introduces students to selected topics in Latin American history and culture through film, readings, documentaries, class discussion and lectures.  One goal is to explore significant influences that have molded Latin American history from the conquest through the early twentieth century.  Another is for students to develop their analytical capabilities to utilize both visual and written materials as they engage in discussion, write analytical essays and outlines.  

Topics to be discussed include: portrait of indigenous peoples, culture clash, role of the imperial or national state. role of church, gender. family, influence of class, foreign influence in Latin America, violence, portraits of the city versus the country, treatment of the poor’ portraits of the military, difference between foreign vs Latin American-produced cinema, difference what films show and what historians write. 

Texts

Each week primary and secondary source readings will be posted on Blackboard.

Grading

Students must write 3  (4-6 pp) essays comparing or exploring a theme in the assigned films and readings and  write outlines of sources and themes they would have used if they had written essays for the other films. They must participate in class discussion of visuals and readings.

3 essays   60 %

discussion 20 % 

4 outlines  20 %  

 

LAS 366 • History Of The Caribbean

40180 • Fall 2011
Meets W 330pm-630pm MEZ 1.118
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

This course provides uses documentaries, film, lectures and readings to provide an overview of Caribbean history from 1492 to the present. The prominent theme will be to explore how the dynamic among differing conquerors, natives, and slaves forged the distinctive Caribbean nations of the present with their Spanish, British, French, Dutch, Danish and United States cultural heritages. The focus throughout will be to measure the extent to which these distinctive cultural and colonial heritages shaped historical development. Topical themes include: contact between European and native cultures, piracy, the impact of sugar and slavery, colonialism, de-colonization, the impact of the U.S. as a Caribbean power (Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands), Caribbean revolutions (Cuba, Grenada), the Caribbean in the 21st Century.

 

Texts

Each week 50-100 pp of primary and secondary source readings will be posted on Blackboard.

 

Grading

4 ESSAYS 8/14 (1/7 APIECE)

DISCUSSION 3/14

MINI-ASSIGNMENT 1/14

INDIVIDUAL PROJECT 2/14 (1/7 APIECE)

LAS 386 • Latin American Colonial Hist

40795 • Spring 2011
Meets M 200pm-500pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as HIS 386L )
show description

The goal of this course is for students to write a publishable research paper.  While the seminar will focus on the colonial era, students may write essays on any period.  During the first weeks, the seminar will discuss strategies to analyze archival indices and explore archives, the organization of research materials and the analysis of colonial documents.  The seminar will read archival documents, and learn and practice fundamentals of paleography.  

Texts

Readings will be posted on blackboard or xerox handouts

Grading

Each student will write a competitive research proposal on their chosen paper topic, which the seminar will evaluate.  During the middle weeks of the seminar students will meet one-on-one with the professor to discuss progress in research and writing.  For the final weeks, the seminar will convene as a scholarly conference and each student will deliver a paper on his or her topic.  Students will share and comment on the full text of their papers. 

 

Students should attend every class, participate in assignments and discussion, and keep assigned meetings with the professor.  The professor may lessen the final course grade if such requirements are not met.  Normally, the grade assigned the research paper will be the final grade.

LAS 310 • Film/Hist In Lat Amer: Modern

40085 • Fall 2010
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 136
(also listed as HIS 306N )
show description

FILM AND HISTORY IN LATIN AMERICA: MODERN
FALL 2010
HIS 306N/39005
LAS 310/40085

PROFESSOR ANN TWINAM
GARRISON 2.114
ANNTWINAM@MAIL.UTEXAS.EDU

OFFICE HOURS: M 10:30 -11:30, 5:30-6:30
AND BY APPOINTMENT

TEACHING ASSISTANT: JEFFREY PARKER
OFFICE HOURS:  TUES, 10-12 AND BY APPOINTMENT (BUR. 454)

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

THIS COURSE INTRODUCES STUDENTS TO SELECTED TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE THROUGH FILM, READINGS, DOCUMENTARIES, CLASS DISCUSSION AND LECTURES.  ONE GOAL IS TO EXPLORE SIGNIFICANT INFLUENCES THAT HAVE MOLDED LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY DURING THE LAST CENTURY.  ANOTHER IS FOR STUDENTS TO DEVELOP THEIR ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES TO UTILIZE BOTH VISUAL AND WRITTEN MATERIALS AS THEY ENGAGE IN DISCUSSION AND WRITE ANALYTICAL ESSAYS.

 

ASSIGNED READINGS.

            I HAVE POSTED ASSIGNED READINGS UNDER COURSE DOCUMENTS ON BLACKBOARD.  IT WOULD BE WISE TO PRINT THESE OUT IN ADVANCE.

ATTENDANCE

CLASS ATTENDANCE WILL BE TAKEN AND IS MANDATORY GIVEN THAT THE CLASS MEETS BUT ONCE A WEEK.  STUDENTS MUST ARRIVE ON TIME, STAY FOR THE ENTIRE CLASS, VIEW ALL FILMS AND DOCUMENTARIES AND PARTICIPATE IN CLASS DISCUSSION.  MISSED OR PARTIALLY ATTENDED CLASSES WILL BE HANDLED BY THE FOLLOWING PROTOCOL:  IF THERE IS A GOOD REASON (E.G. SICKNESS, FAMILY EMERGENCY) THE STUDENT MUST INFORM THE PROFESSOR OF THE ISSUE, VIEW MISSED VISUALS AND WRITE AN EXTRA PAPER TO MAKE UP FOR THE MISSED CLASS MATERIALS.  ANY UNEXCUSED ABSENCES OR FAILURE TO WRITE MAKE UP PAPERS WILL RESULT IN A LOWERING OF THE GRADE FOR THE CLASS

 

GRADE CALCULATION

3 ESSAYS   60 %
DISCUSSION 20 %
2 OUTLINES  10 %
MINI-ASSIGNMENTS 10%
ESSAYS – 60%

STUDENTS MUST WRITE 3 (4-6 PP) ESSAYS COMPARING OR EXPLORING A THEME IN THE ASSIGNED FILMS AND READINGS.  

YOUR PAPER SHOULD NOT ONLY SHOW KNOWLEDGE OF THE FILM AND DOCUMENTARIES, BUT MELD ANALYSIS FROM THE ASSIGNED READINGS AND LECTURES.  WHAT IS IMPORTANT IS THE EXTENT TO WHICH YOU USE BOTH VISUAL AND WRITTEN MATERIAL TO PRODUCE AN ANALYTICAL AND DOCUMENTED ESSAY.  YOU SHOULD USE ONLY THE ASSIGNED READINGS, FILMS, DOCUMENTARIES AND MATERIAL FROM LECTURES OR OTHER CLASS PRESENTATIONS IN YOUR ESSAYS.  YOU SHOULD NOT USE OTHER MATERIAL IN THESE ESSAYS, THE GOAL IS TO DEMONSTRATE YOUR ABILITY TO ANALYZE THE ASSIGNED VISUAL AND WRITTEN MATERIALS.  YOU MUST WRITE EITHER ESSAY ONE OR ESSAY TWO.

TOPICS TO CONSIDER INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:

PORTRAIT OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES
CULTURE CLASH
ROLE NATIONAL STATE
ROLE OF CHURCH
GENDER
ROLE OF WOMEN
ROLE OF MEN
FAMILY
INFLUENCE OF CLASS
FOREIGN INFLUENCE IN LATIN AMERICA
VIOLENCE
REVOLUTION
POVERTY
PORTRAITS OF THE MILITARY
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN FOREIGN VS LATIN AMERICAN-PRODUCED CINEMA
DIFFERENCE WHAT FILMS SHOW AND WHAT HISTORIANS WRITE
DIFFERENCE IN FILMS PRODUCED BY LATIN AMERICANS OR BY OTHERS

 

II. DISCUSSION---20%

 DISCUSSION: STUDENTS SHOULD COME PREPARED TO CONTRIBUTE TO DISCUSSION.  AT THE END OF EACH CLASS WHERE THERE IS DISCUSSION, STUDENTS WILL GIVE THEMSELVES A GRADE OF PLUS OR ZERO FOR THEIR PARTICIPATION THAT DAY SUBJECT TO CONFIRMATION BY THE PROFESSOR.  AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER, THE POINTS WILL BE CURVED AND A LETTER GRADE ASSIGNED FOR THE DISCUSSION COMPONENT.  STUDENTS SHOULD MAKE VERY CLEAR  ON THE SHEET IF THEY ACTUALLY CONTRIBUTED TO  CLASS PARTICIPATION.  IF A STUDENT ATTEMPTED TO COMMENT BUT WAS  NOT CALLED UPON, HE OR SHE SHOULD WRITE THEIR PROPOSED COMMENT ON THE DISCUSSION SHEET.  THE PROFESSOR MAY OR MAY ASSIGN CREDIT TO THAT CONTRIBUTION DEPENDING UPON THE INTENSITY OF CLASS PARTICIPATION.   

 

III. OUTLINES—10 %         

OUTLINE:  STUDENTS MUST HAND IN A ONE-PAGE OUTLINE OF TWO OF THE THREE SECTIONS WHERE THEY HAVE NOT WRITTEN ESSAYS.  THESE TWO SECTIONS MUST SUGGEST A TOPIC THAT YOU WOULD HAVE WRITTEN AND PROVIDE QUOTES FROM THE READINGS OR MATERIAL THAT YOU WOULD HAVE INCLUDED IN THE ESSAY.
 

IV.  MINI-ASSIGNMENT—10%

MINI-ASSIGNMENT.  THERE IS A MINI ASSIGNMENT FOR EACH OF THE SIX  SEGMENTS OF THE CLASS.  GO ONLINE AND PRINT OUT A PAGE OR TWO OF MATERIAL RELEVANT TO THE TOPIC OF THE MINI-ASSIGNMENT QUESTION AND PROVIDE A HARD COPY.

STUDENTS WHO HAND IN PAPERS LATE WILL BE PENALIZED.  EACH DAY AFTER THE ASSIGNMENT IS DUE A GRADE WILL BE DEDUCTED BY A THIRD OF A LETTER.  WHAT HAPPENS, FOR EXAMPLE, IF A PAPER IS DUE ON MONDAY AND THE STUDENT HANDS THE PAPER ON WEDNESDAY?  IF THE PAPER IS GRADED AS AN A-, THE ACTUAL GRADE THE STUDENT RECEIVES WILL BE A B+ IF HANDED IN ON TUESDAY, A B IF HANDED IN ON WEDNESDAY, AND A B- IF HANDED IN ON THURSDAY. AGAIN, IF THERE ARE VALID EXCUSES (SUCH AS ILLNESS OR RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCE) EXCEPTIONS WILL BE MADE TO THE RULE.    THE GREATEST PENALTY DEDUCTED FOR LATENESS WILL NOT EXCEED TWO LETTER GRADES.  (I PENALIZE LATE PAPERS TO BE FAIR TO THE REST OF THE CLASS AS THOSE WHO HAND IN LATE HAVE HAD MORE TIME TO WORK ON THEIR ESSAY.) STUDENTS WHO HAND IN MINI-ASSIGNMENTS LATE WILL ALSO RECEIVE ONE LOWER GRADE.

ALL ASSIGNMENTS MUST BE COMPLETED TO RECEIVE A FINAL GRADE BASED ON: 3 ESSAYS, 2 OUTLINES, 6 MINIS, DISCUSSION, ATTENDANCE.

 

TOPICS AND READINGS

I. MEXICO: THE REVOLUTION AND BEYOND.  (B)

 FILM:  AND STARRING PANCHO VILLA AS HIMSELF

CLIPS: LET’S GO WITH PANCHO VILLA

                        DOCUMENTARY: PANCHO VILLA AND OTHER STORIES

                        CLIP: DISNEY, 3 CABALLEROS

                        DOCUMENTARY: SENORITA EXTRAVIADA

  READINGS:

ARNOLD J. BAUER, “MILLERS AND GRINDERS: TECHNOLOGY AND HOUSEHOLD ECONOMY IN MESO-AMERICA,” AGRICULTURAL HISTORY LXIV:  1 (WINTER 1990):1-17.

ELIZABETH SALAS, THE SOLDADERA IN THE MEXICAN REVOLUTION:  WAR AND MEN'S ILLUSIONS (AUSTIN, 1990): 93-105.

JOHN REED, INSURGENT MEXICO (NEW YORK 1983): 97-135. 

ALAN WELLS, BOOK REVIEW OF FRIEDRICH KATZ, THE LIFE AND TIMES OF PANCHO VILLA, IN HISPANIC AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW 80.1 (2000): 141-146.  

MINI-ASSIGNMENT: PRINT FROM THE INTERNET AN UPDATE ON WHAT HAS BEEN HAPPENING IN CIUDAD JUAREZ (MURDER OF WOMEN, DRUG WARS)

           

II. THE BORDERS: CENTRAL AMERICA, MEXICO, UNITED STATES (A)

                        FILM: EL NORTE   

                        DOCUMENTARY: EL OTRO LADO, DE NADIE                    

READINGS

 TED CONOVER, COYOTES:  A JOURNEY THROUGH THE SECRET WORLD OF AMERICA'S ILLEGAL ALIENS     (NEW YORK, 1987): 191-246

 

TRACEY J. ANDREWS, EL AL., “NEGOTIATING SURVIVAL:  UNDOCUMENTED MEXICAN IMMIGRANT WOMEN IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST,” THE SOCIAL SCIENCE JOURNAL 39(2002): 431-49

GORDON H. HANSON, “ILLEGAL MIGRATION FROM MEXICO TO THE UNITED STATES,” JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC LITERATURE XLIV (DECEMBER 2006): 869-924.  (SKIP THE MATH!)

MINI-ASSIGNMENT:  PRINT FROM THE INTERNET AN UPDATE CONCERNING CONTROVERSY OVER IMMIGRATION AND THE BORDER.

                                     

III.            ARGENTINA: THE PERSONISM AND EVITA  (A)

 

FILM: CLIPS FROM EVITA  AND : THE MYSTERY OF EVA PERON

DOC:             EVA PERON

            READINGS: 

J. M. TAYLOR, EVITA PERON:  THE MYTHS OF A WOMAN (CHICAGO, 1979): 34-111, 128-137.

MINI-ASSIGNMENT:  LOOK FOR UPDATE INFORMATION OR A WEBSITE ON EVITA PERON AND PRINT OUT SOMETHING NOTABLE.  

 

IV. CUBA I: THE REVOLUTION CONSIDERED                                                              

             FILM:  PORTRAIT OF TERESA

             DOCUMENTARY: FIDEL CASTRO

READINGS:

 MARGARET RANDALL, ED. CUBAN WOMEN NOW: INTERVIEWS WITH   CUBAN WOMEN (LONDON, 1974): 267-289.           

MAXIME MOLYNEAUX, “STATE, GENDER AND INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE: THE FEDERACION DE MUJERES CUBANAS”.  IN E. DORE AND M MOLYNEUX EDS., HIDDEN HISTORIES OF GENDER AND THE STATE IN LATIN AMERICA, (DURHAM, 2000): 291-321

MINI-ASSIGNMENT:  PRINT FROM THE INTERNET WHAT HAS BEEN GOING ON IN CUBA CONCERNING WOMEN AND THE REVOLUTION.

 

V:  ARGENTINA AND DIRTY WARS

FILM: THE OFFICIAL STORY
            THE MOTHERS OF PLAZA DE MAYO
            60 MINUTES
            OUR DISAPPEARED

READINGS: 

ANDREW GRAHAM-YOOL, A MATTER OF FEAR.  (WESTPORT, 1982): IX- XII, 12-31, 111-122.                       

FRANK GRAZIANO, DIVINE VIOLENCE: SPECTACLE, PSYCHOSEXUALITY AND RADICAL CHRISTIANITY IN THE ARGENTINE "DIRTY WAR."  (BOULDER, 1992):15-59.

MARTIN EDWIN ANDERSON, DOSSIER SECRETO:   ARGENTINA'S DESAPARECIDOS AND THE MYTH  OF THE "DIRTY WAR.”  (BOULDER, 1993): 194-213, 315-323.                       

OPTIONAL: NUNCA MAS (NEW YORK, 1986):  XI-XXVIII. 1-6, 284-95, 301-12

ANDREW GRAHAM-YOOL, A MATTER OF FEAR.  (WESTPORT, 1982): IX- XII, 12-31, 111-122.                  

MINI-ASSIGNMENT: PRINT FROM THE INTERNET AN UPDATE CONCERNING THE MOTHERS OF PLAZA DE MAYO OR WHAT HAPPENING TO THOSE INVOLVED IN THE DIRTY WAR

 

VI: CUBA: THE REVOLUTION RECONSIDERED

 

FILM:   BITTER SUGAR         

READINGS:

MAURICE HALPERIN, RETURN TO HAVANA:  THE DECLINE OF CUBAN SOCIETY UNDER CASTRO (NASHVILLE, 1994): PP. 44-56, 121-38, 187-91.

JEFFREY L ROBERG, ALYSON KUTTRUFF “CUBA: IDEOLOGICAL SUCCESS OR IDEOLOGICAL FAILURE?” HUMAN RIGHTS QUARTERLY 29(2007): 779-795.

EDWARD GONZALES, KEVIN F. MCCARTHY “CUBA’S UNCERTAIN FUTURE AFTER FIDEL” BROWN JOURNAL OF WORLD AFFAIRS, FALL/WINTER (2007): 27-39.

MINI-ASSIGNMENT:  PRINT FROM THE INTERNET WHAT HAS BEEN GOING ON IN CUBA THE LAST SIX MONTHS.

 

TENTATIVE SEMESTER SCHEDULE

(GIVEN THE VARIOUS CLASS ENTHUSIASMS THIS SYLLABUS MAY LINGER A BIT LONGER OR MOVE FASTER OVER VARIOUS TOPICS. IF THERE ARE ANY CHANGES IN VISUALS OR DATES DUE OF ASSIGNMENTS THE PROFESSOR WILL NOTIFY THE  CLASS .)

WEEK

DATE

IN CLASS

DISCUSSION

DUE  IN CLASS*

WORK DUE IN CLASS

WEEK 1

8/30

INTRODUCTION

SYLLABUS

LECTURE

DOC  VILLA

 

 

 

WEEK 2

9/6

LABOR DAY NO CLASS

 

 

WEEK 3

9/13

DOC VILLA

CLIPS VILLA

LECTURE

FILM VILLA

 

DISCUSSION BAUER, SALAS

 

WEEK 4

9/20

FILM  VILLA

CLIPS DISNEY

LECTURE

DISCUSSION REED, WELLS

 

 

WEEK 5

9/27

LECTURE

DOC SENORITA EXTRAVIADA

LECTURE

 

DISCUSSION MINI

 

MEXICO MINI DUE

 

WEEK 6

10/4

FILM EL NORTE

 

DISCUSSION CONOVER

ESSAY /OUTLINE ONE, MEXICO DUE

WEEK 7

10/11

DOC EL OTRO LADO

DOC DE NADIE

 

DISCUSSION ANDREWS

 

WEEK 8

10/18

DOC DE NADIE

LECTURE

DOC  EVITA

DISCUSSION, ANDREWS, HANSON

DISCUSSION MINI

 

BORDERS MINI DUE

WEEK 9

10/25

CLIPS EVITA

 DOC EVITA LECTURE

 

DISCUSSION TAYLOR, MINI

PERON MINI DUE

 

ESSAY/OUTLINE TWO BORDERS DUE—YOU MUST HAVE WRITTEN EITHER ESSAY ONE OR TWO

WEEK 10

11/1

DOC CASTRO

FILM PORTRAIT OF TERESA

 

DISCUSSION

 

 

ESSAY/OUTLINE THREE/PERON DUE

 

WEEK 11

11/8

FILM PORTRAIT OF TERESA

SLIDES

LECTURE

 

DISCUSSION MOLYENAUX RANDALL

 

CUBA 1 MINI DUE

WEEK 12

11/15

DOC MOTHERS OF PLAZA DE MAYO

FILM OFFICIAL STORY

 

 

ESSAY/OUTLINE FOUR/CUBA1 DUE

 

WEEK 13

11/22

FILM OFFICIAL STORY

DOC  OUR DISAPPEARED DISCUSSION MIN

DISCUSSION

YOOL GRAZIANO, ANDERSON

 

ARGENTINA MINI DUE

WEEK 14

11/29

LECTURE

 

FILM BITTER SUGAR

 

DISCUSSION DISCUSSION

YOOL GRAZIANO, ANDERSON

QUESTIONS ON HALPERIN,  ROBERG, GONZALES

 

ESSAY/OUTLINE FIVE/ARGENTINA 2 DUE

 

CUBA 2 MINI DUE

 

 

 

 

ESSAY OUTLINE SIX/CUBA 2 DUE TBA CLASS

 

* DISCUSSION FROM ONE CLASS MAY BE EXTENDED TO THE NEXT CLASS

PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF YOU NEED ANY ACCOMMODATION UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THE ADA.

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY (CHEATING, PLAGIARISM, ETC.)  WILL BE SEVERELY PUNISHED.  ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICIES AT UT CAN BE LOCATED AT: www.utexas.edu/depts/dos/sjs

LAS 366 • History Of The Caribbean-W

40580 • Spring 2010
Meets M 400pm-700pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as HIS 350L )
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Topics vary each semester to allow curriculum flexibility for faculty members and visiting scholars.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

LAS 366 • Colonial Latin America

40590 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JGB 2.102
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Topics vary each semester to allow curriculum flexibility for faculty members and visiting scholars.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

LAS 366 • History Of The Caribbean-W

39984 • Spring 2009
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 0.120
(also listed as HIS 350L )
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Topics vary each semester to allow curriculum flexibility for faculty members and visiting scholars.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

LAS 366 • Colonial Latin America

39990 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CAL 100
show description

Topics vary each semester to allow curriculum flexibility for faculty members and visiting scholars.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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