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Charles R. Hale, Director SRH 1.310, 2300 Red River Street D0800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512.471.5551

Amelia Weinreb

Lecturer Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Lecturer, Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies
Amelia Weinreb

Contact

Interests

Cuba's middle class; Jewish Latin America

LAS 324L • Jewish Cuba

39615 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.120
(also listed as ANT 325L, J S 365, R S 366 )
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Cuba has a small Jewish community (between 1,000-1,500) whose origins are presumed to date back to 1492. By some accounts, the contemporary community is dying, and by others, it is vibrant. No matter the assessment, it is a community that has been written about and analyzed disproportionately for its size. As noted Cuban-American Jewish anthropologist Ruth Behar has proposed, Jewish Cuba presents the challenge of focusing on a small community to understand large philosophical and cultural issues: Diaspora, preserving identity in hybridized social worlds, and the concept of home. In learning about Jewish Cuba, students of are not only exposed to a nationally-specific case study in Jewish Latin America, but have the opportunity to study the relationship between state politics and Jewish life, Judaism under communist regimes, religious and linguistic revitalization movements, migration, and cultural survival. To explore these themes and concepts, this course uses scholarly texts and ethnographic accounts, but also personal memoirs, films, photographs, and documentaries about Jewish Cuba.

Core questions we address in the course are: What is Home? What is Diaspora? What is Revolution?  How do we write about it?

Note: This course carries a Writing Flag and a Global Cultures Flag.

LAS 315 • Intro To Jewish Latin America

40531 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.118
(also listed as ANT 310L, HIS 306N, J S 311, R S 313 )
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What can we learn about Latin American social worlds when we look at the place of Jews within it? Conversely, what we learn about Jewish social worlds when they unfold in Latin America?  This course examines both of these questions. Specifically, we consider the role of Latin America as both a refuge from and a source of antisemitism, a hub of immigration, a site of Zionism, and of Jewish success and philanthropy.  We also address themes of displacement, longing, belonging, marginalization, prejudice, immigration, community, cultural continuity, and memory, while considering Sephardi and Ashkenazi difference, and inter-generational conflict among Jewish Latin Americans. Overall, through reading, writing exercises, independent research and in-class films, the course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how Jews constructed individual lives and vibrant communities in predominantly Hispanic, Catholic countries of Latin America.

With these themes in mind, the course is divided into four units: 1) Historical literacy is a substantive introductory unit, which provides basic context from 1492 until the post-World War II period; 2) Jewish group identities in Latin American features readings on Jewish life and cultural forms in select national contexts (e.g. Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Dominican Republic and others); 3) Memoir and personal narrative engages students in critical reading of creative non-fiction and ethnography that focuses on individual lives; 4) Contemporary realities explores current events, contemporary trends and popular culture in Jewish Latin America. Finally, over the course of the semester, drawing on course motifs, students will produce their own research papers addressing a specific research question in the Latin American national context of their choice.

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

LAS 324L • Jewish Cuba

40845 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GDC 2.402
(also listed as ANT 325L, J S 365 )
show description

Jewish Cuba  JS, ANT, LAS

9:30am-11:00am TTh  GDC 2.402

Cuba has a small Jewish community (between 1,000-1,500) whose origins are presumed to date back to 1492. By some accounts, the contemporary community is dying, and by others, it is vibrant. No matter the assessment, it is a community that has been written about and analyzed disproportionately for its size. As noted Cuban-American Jewish anthropologist Ruth Behar has proposed, Jewish Cuba presents the challenge of focusing on a small community to understand large philosophical and cultural issues: Diaspora, preserving identity in hybridized social worlds, and the concept of home. In learning about Jewish Cuba, students of are not only exposed to a nationally-specific case study in Jewish Latin America, but have the opportunity to study the relationship between state politics and Jewish life, Judaism under communist regimes, religious and linguistic revitalization movements, migration, and cultural survival. To explore these themes and concepts, this course uses scholarly texts and ethnographic accounts, but also personal memoirs, films, photographs, and documentaries about Jewish Cuba.

Core questions we address in the course are: What is Home? What is Diaspora? What is Revolution?  How do we write about it?

Note: This course carries a Writing Flag and a Global Cultures Flag.

LAS 310 • Intro To Jewish Latin America

40730 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am CLA 0.118
(also listed as ANT 310L, HIS 306N, J S 311 )
show description

What can we learn about Latin American social worlds when we look at the place of Jews within it? Conversely, what we learn about Jewish social worlds when they unfold in Latin America?  This course examines both of these questions. Specifically, we consider the role of Latin America as both a refuge from and a source of anti-Semitism, a hub of immigration, a site of Zionism, and of Jewish success and philanthropy.  We also address themes of displacement, longing, belonging, marginalization, prejudice, immigration, community, cultural continuity, and memory, while considering Sephardi and Ashkenazi difference, and inter-generational conflict among Jewish Latin Americans. Overall, through reading, writing exercises, independent research and in-class films, the course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how Jews constructed individual lives and vibrant communities in predominantly Hispanic, Catholic countries of Latin America.

With these themes in mind, the course is divided into four units:

  1. Historical literacy is a substantive introductory unit, which provides basic context from 1492 until the post-World War II period;
  2. Jewish group identities in Latin American features readings on Jewish life and cultural forms in select national contexts (e.g. Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Dominican Republic and others);
  3. Memoir and personal narrative engages students in critical reading of creative non-fiction and quasi-ethnography that focuses on individual lives;
  4. Contemporary realities explores current events, contemporary trends and popular culture in Jewish Latin America.

Finally, over the course of the semester, drawing on course motifs, students will produce their own research papers addressing a specific research question in the Latin American national context of their choice.

*Enjoy Latin American breakfast beverages served in class*

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

LAS 310 • Anthropology Of Latin Amer

40185-40200 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 1000am-1100am UTC 3.124
(also listed as ANT 310L )
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The goal of this course is to provide an anthropological framework for understanding contemporary Latin America. In particular, we will analyze Latin American history, politics, economics and forms of cultural and social change. We also address the role of colonialism, urbanization, gender, race, social movements, transitions to democracy and market economies, migration, transnational communities, and the impacts of globalization in the Latin American context. This is not a standard survey course, covering the region as a whole, however. Instead, following an introductory unit which provides socio-historical context, students will engage in critical reading of four ethnographies on specific countries on different sub-regions within Latin America in order to explore particular topics and questions in more depth. This year’s country focus is on Nicaragua, Peru, Ecuador, and Cuba. In each of the units of the course, we will supplement ethnographies with textbook readings and news articles that provide further historical and contemporary context.

 

LAS 310 • Anthropology Of Latin Amer

40165 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am JGB 2.216
(also listed as ANT 310L )
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The goal of this course is to provide a framework for understanding contemporary life in Latin America. In particular, we will analyze Latin American history, politics, economics and forms of cultural and social change through the critical reading of ethnography. Themes covered throughout the course address anthropological understanding of the role of colonialism, urbanization, gender, race, social movements, transitions to democracy and market economies, migration, transnational communities, and the impacts of globalization in the Latin American context. In each of the thematic units of the course, we will supplement textbook readings with ethnographies, and discuss how they illuminate each other. Finally, the course includes a final research paper based on either: a) participation local, small-scale, original field work project conducted with members of a Latin American Diaspora community, or b) library-based research synthesizing theory and ethnography of a selected Latin American country.

LAS 310 • Anthropology Of Latin Amer

40087-40088 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 1000am-1100am UTC 3.132
(also listed as ANT 310L, ANT 310L )
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The goal of this course is to provide a framework for understanding contemporary concerns in the Latin America. In particular, we will analyze Latin American history, politics, economics and forms of cultural and social change through anthropological theory and ethnography. Students will engage in critical reading of selected ethnographies on countries on different sub-regions within Latin America (México and Central America, the Caribbean, the Andes, and Brazil and the Southern Cone). The course, however, is organized thematically. Some of the themes covered address anthropological understanding of the role of colonialism, peasants, urbanization, gender, race, social movements and transitions to democracy and market economies as well as migration, transnational communities, and the impacts of globalization in the Latin American context. In each of the thematic units of the course, we will supplement textbook readings with ethnographic selections and theoretical pieces, and discuss how they illuminate each other.  Finally, the course includes the integration of a small-scale original fieldwork component, based in Austin. This course, which will be run in a seminar-style format, is recommended for motivated undergraduate students at any stage who are developing a regional interest in Latin America

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