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Charles R. Hale, Director SRH 1.310, 2300 Red River Street D0800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512.471.5551

Seth W. Garfield

Associate Professor Ph.D., Yale University

Associate Professor, Department of History
Seth W. Garfield

Contact

Interests

Brazilian history; race and ethnicity in Latin America; indigenous policy; comparative frontiers

LAS 386 • Postcolonial Brazil

39795 • Spring 2015
Meets TH 930am-1230pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as HIS 386K )
show description

This course examines the history of Latin America's largest and most populous nation, shedding light on Brazil's political history, economic development, and cultural formation. The course looks at principal topics in postcolonial Brazilian history: Independence and Empire, slavery and post-emancipation society; formation of racial, class, and gender identities;  urbanization and industrialization; foreign relations; frontier expansion; and bureaucratic-authoritarianism.  We begin with the fundamental premise that nation-states are sociocultural constructions whose inclusiveness, legitimacy, and viability vary from one historical moment to another.  The challenges to nation-building that confronted Brazil--with its oligarchic, patriarchal, and slavocratic heritage, economic "underdevelopment," multiethnic population, and pronounced regionalism--are the matters to be interrogated through the readings.

As a graduate course in history, we will explore not only events and processes in the past but focus closely on questions of argumentation, evidence, and historiography.  

Assignments

Over the course of the semester, students will write eleven book reviews (2-3 pp. each). The essay should highlight the factual, methodological, and historiographical contributions of the text.    The final paper  (8 pp.) will consist of a comparative/historiographical essay that examines at least four texts to analyze divergences or overlaps in the treatment of a given historical theme.  

Readings      

Emilia Viotti da Costa, The Brazilian Empire: Myths and Histories

         João José Reis, Slave Rebellion in Brazil

Zephyr Frank, Dutra’s World

João José Reis, Death is a Festival

Julyan Peard, Race, Place, and Medicine

Paulina Alberto, Terms of Inclusion:  Black Intellectuals in Twentieth-Century Brazil

Brodwyn Fischer, A Poverty of Rights: Citizenship and Inequality in Twentieth-Century Rio de Janeiro

Barbara Weinstein, For Social Peace in Brazil: Industrialists and the Remaking of the Working Class in São Paulo, 1920-1964

Susan Besse, Restructuring Patriarchy

Amy Chazkel, Laws of Chance:  Brazil’s Clandestine Lottery and the Making of

         Urban Public Life

LAS 301 • Key Ideas & Iss In Lat Amer

40515 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WEL 2.308
(also listed as HIS 306N )
show description

The course aims to acquaint students with the richness, complexity and diversity of historical experiences and cultural practices in Latin America through an array of source materials that include historical monographs, ethnography, testimonial literature, fiction, music, film, and documentaries.  Through a sample of case studies culled from throughout the region, the course will shed light on the processes, structures, and forces that have shaped Latin America.  Topics include:  pre-Columbian civilizations, Iberian expansionism and the Conquest of Latin America; Church in colonial Latin America;  sugar plantations in Brazil and the trans-Atlantic slave trade; Independence movements; agro-export economies; U.S. imperialism in the Caribbean Basin; populism, urbanization , and import-substitution industrialization; popular culture, art, literature and music; revolutionary alternatives; the Cold War in Latin America and state-sponsored violence; transnational flows of capital and labor.

Texts:

Thomas Skidmore and Peter Smith, Modern Latin America

Mark Danner, The Massacre at El Mozote

Grading:

- Attendance and Classroom Participation (10%)

- Two in-class exams (30%)

-One 2-3 pp. book review (20%).  Essay topic for book review will be handed out one week in advance of due date.  Grade for book review will be based on organization, development and clarity of argument; substantiation of thesis through textual material; and elegance of prose.

-Final Exam (40%)

LAS 366 • Dict/Drty War/Dem Lat Amer

40975 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 2.102
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

This course explores the breakdown of democratic governments in Latin America in the 1960s and 1970s and the emergence of bureaucratic authoritarian regimes committed to economic restructuring, political demobilization, and the abrogation of civil liberties. It examines the use of torture, disappearances, and other counterinsurgency methods by Latin American military officials, as well as various forms of resistance, including guerrilla warfare. Finally, it looks at the transition to democratic rule, efforts to reconstruct civil society and forge political reconciliation, and the struggle for justice among the victims and families of victims of human rights abuses.

The course focuses on the histories of the nations of the Southern Cone (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay) and seeks to address a number of questions. Why did some of the most "developed" nations in Latin America cede to such repressive governments?  How did authoritarian regimes legitimize their rule?  How can we make sense of the atrocities committed?  In what ways did citizens resist or acquiesce in the policies of military governments?  What role did the United States play in offering economic, political, and military assistance to military dictatorships?  Which factors spurred the military to relinquish power and what has been the nature of the transition to democratic rule?  How can social peace and justice be best achieved in societies that experienced such trauma?  How is this period of Latin American history remembered?

Texts:

•    Pamela Constable & Arturo Valenzuela        A Nation of Enemies: Chile under Pinochet

•    Course packet

Grading:

•    Class participation                20%

•    Four papers                    65%

•    Two short response papers        15%

 

LAS 301 • Key Ideas & Iss In Lat Amer

40715 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WAG 201
(also listed as HIS 306N )
show description

The course aims to acquaint students with the richness, complexity and diversity of historical experiences and cultural practices in Latin America through an array of source materials that include historical monographs, ethnography, testimonial literature, fiction, music, film, and documentaries.  Through a sample of case studies culled from throughout the region, the course will shed light on the processes, structures, and forces that have shaped Latin America.  Topics include:  pre-Columbian civilizations, Iberian expansionism and the Conquest of Latin America; Church in colonial Latin America;  sugar plantations in Brazil and the trans-Atlantic slave trade; Independence movements; agro-export economies; U.S. imperialism in the Caribbean Basin; populism, urbanization , and import-substitution industrialization; popular culture, art, literature and music; revolutionary alternatives; the Cold War in Latin America and state-sponsored violence; transnational flows of capital and labor.

Texts:

Thomas Skidmore and Peter Smith, Modern Latin AmericaMark Danner, The Massacre at El Mozote

Grading:

- Attendance and Classroom Participation (10%)

- Two in-class exams (30%)

-One 2-3 pp. book review (20%).

Essay topic for book review will be handed out one week in advance of due date.  Grade for book review will be based on organization, development and clarity of argument; substantiation of thesis through textual material; and elegance of prose.

-Final Exam (40%)

LAS 366 • Dictator/Dirty War In Lat Amer

40410 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.120
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

This course explores the breakdown of democratic governments in Latin America in the 1960s and 1970s and the emergence of bureaucratic authoritarian regimes committed to economic restructuring, political demobilization, and the abrogation of civil liberties. It examines the use of torture, disappearances, and other counterinsurgency methods by Latin American military officials, as well as various forms of resistance, including guerrilla warfare. Finally, it looks at the transition to democratic rule, efforts to reconstruct civil society and forge political reconciliation, and the struggle for justice among the victims and families of victims of human rights abuses.

 

The course focuses on the histories of the nations of the Southern Cone (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay) and seeks to address a number of questions. Why did some of the most "developed" nations in Latin America cede to such repressive governments?  How did authoritarian regimes legitimize their rule?  How can we make sense of the atrocities committed?  In what ways did citizens resist or acquiesce in the policies of military governments?  What role did the United States play in offering economic, political, and military assistance to military dictatorships?  Which factors spurred the military to relinquish power and what has been the nature of the transition to democratic rule?  How can social peace and justice be best achieved in societies that experienced such trauma?  How is this period of Latin American history remembered?

 

Texts (subject to final confirmation):

  • Pamela Constable & Arturo Valenzuela                        A Nation of Enemies: Chile under Pinochet
  • Course packet

 

Grading:

  • Class participation                                           20%
  • Four papers                                                      65%

Two short response papers                               15%

LAS 386 • Postcolonial Brazil

40635 • Spring 2013
Meets TH 300pm-600pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as HIS 386K )
show description

This course examines the history of Latin America's largest and most populous nation, shedding light on Brazil's political history, economic development, and cultural formation. The course looks at principal topics in postcolonial Brazilian history: Independence and Empire, slavery and post-emancipation society; formation of racial, class, and gender identities;  urbanization and industrialization; foreign relations; frontier expansion; and bureaucratic-authoritarianism.  We begin with the fundamental premise that nation-states are sociocultural constructions whose inclusiveness, legitimacy, and viability vary from one historical moment to another.  The challenges to nation-building that confronted Brazil--with its oligarchic, patriarchal, and slavocratic heritage, economic "underdevelopment," multiethnic population, and pronounced regionalism--are the matters to be interrogated through the readings.

LAS 301 • Key Ideas And Iss In Lat Amer

40180 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm UTC 3.104
(also listed as HIS 306N )
show description

This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Latin America.

With 20 nations and a total population of over 500 million, Latin America is an area of fascinating cultural diversity as well as troubling socioeconomic inequality.

The course aims to acquaint students with the richness, complexity and diversity of historical experiences and cultural practices in Latin America through an array of source materials that include historical monographs, ethnography, fiction, music, film, and documentaries.   Through case studies culled from throughout the region, the course will shed light on the processes, structures, and forces that have shaped Latin America.  Topics include:  pre-Columbian civilizations, Iberian expansionism and the Conquest of Latin America; the Church in colonial Latin America;  sugar plantations in Brazil and the trans-Atlantic slave trade; Independence movements; agro-export economies; U.S. imperialism in the Caribbean Basin; populism, urbanization , and import-substitution industrialization; popular culture, art, literature and music; revolutionary alternatives; the Cold War in Latin America and state-sponsored violence; transnational flows of capital and labor.

 

- Attendance and Participation in Lectures, Debates, and Discussion (20%*),

- Take-Home Midterm Exam -  40%

- Take-Home Final Exam   -  40%

 

 

LAS 366 • Dictator/Dirty War In Lat Amer

40255 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.120
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

This course explores the breakdown of democratic governments in Latin America in the 1960s and 1970s and the emergence of bureaucratic authoritarian regimes committed to economic restructuring, political demobilization, and the abrogation of civil liberties. It examines the use of torture, disappearances, and other counterinsurgency methods by Latin American military officials, as well as various forms of resistance, including guerrilla warfare. Finally, it looks at the transition to democratic rule, efforts to reconstruct civil society and forge political reconciliation, and the struggle for justice among the victims and families of victims of human rights abuses.

 

The course focuses on the histories of the nations of the Southern Cone (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay) and seeks to address a number of questions. Why did some of the most "developed" nations in Latin America cede to such repressive governments?  How did authoritarian regimes legitimize their rule?  How can we make sense of the atrocities committed?  In what ways did citizens resist or acquiesce in the policies of military governments?  What role did the United States play in offering economic, political, and military assistance to military dictatorships?  Which factors spurred the military to relinquish power and what has been the nature of the transition to democratic rule?  How can social peace and justice be best achieved in societies that experienced such trauma?  How is this period of Latin American history remembered?

 

Texts (subject to final confirmation):

  • Pamela Constable & Arturo Valenzuela                        A Nation of Enemies: Chile under Pinochet
  • Course packet

 

Grading:

  • Class participation                                           20%
  • Four papers                                                      65%
  • Two short response papers                               15%

LAS 301 • Key Ideas And Iss In Lat Amer

40100 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm UTC 3.104
(also listed as HIS 306N )
show description

The course aims to acquaint students with the richness, complexity and diversity of historical experiences and cultural practices in Latin America through an array of source materials that include historical monographs, ethnography, testimonial literature, fiction, music, film, and documentaries.  Through a sample of case studies culled from throughout the region, the course will shed light on the processes, structures, and forces that have shaped Latin America.  Topics include:  pre-Columbian civilizations, Iberian expansionism and the Conquest of Latin America; Church in colonial Latin America;  sugar plantations in Brazil and the trans-Atlantic slave trade; Independence movements; agro-export economies; U.S. imperialism in the Caribbean Basin; populism, urbanization , and import-substitution industrialization; popular culture, art, literature and music; revolutionary alternatives; the Cold War in Latin America and state-sponsored violence; transnational flows of capital and labor.

Course Requirements

Students final grade will be computed according to the following criteria:

- Attendance and Classroom Participation (10%) 

- Two in-class exams (30%)

-One 2-3 pp. book review (20%).  Essay topic for book review will be handed out one week in advance of due date.  Grade for book review will be based on organization, development and clarity of argument; substantiation of thesis through textual material; and elegance of prose.

-Final Exam (40%)

Required Readings:

Thomas Skidmore and Peter Smith, Modern Latin America

Mark Danner, The Massacre at El Mozote (Available at University Co-op) 

Course Packet available Speedway 

LAS 366 • Modern Brazil

40000 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 4.110
show description

Topics vary each semester to allow curriculum flexibility for faculty members and visiting scholars.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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