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Charles R. Hale, Director SRH 1.310, 2300 Red River Street D0800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512.471.5551

Juliet Hooker

Associate Professor Ph.D., Cornell University

Associate Professor, Department of Government and Department of African & African Diaspora Studies; Associate Director, LLILAS
Juliet Hooker

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Interests

race relations; mulitculturalism; Latin American political thought; indigenous politics; Afro-descendant politics; Latinos in the U.S.

LAS 384L • Us Afr-Am/Lat Am Polit Thought

40447 • Fall 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as AFR 386, GOV 382M )
show description

Despite the current trend towards the study of comparative political theory, the work of Latin American political thinkers, which has been tremendously influential in their own region, remains marginal to the canon of Western political thought. Likewise, the work of U.S. African-American political thinkers is an important yet often overlooked strand of [U.S.] American political thought. This course is an an introduction to the history of these two traditions, and a comparative effort to understand the main thematics in each and the similarities and differences between them. It examines the answers U.S. African-American and Latin American thinkers have given to some of the fundamental preoccupations of political theory, as well as to other questions that have sometimes been viewed as marginal, such as: What is justice? What is freedom? What are the conditions of possibility for democratic politics? How should we theorize race? How should we conceive racial identity? What form should anti-racist politics take? The course will introduce students to some of the most influential figures in U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, including: Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Martí, José Vasconcelos, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, as well as to contemporary thinkers and debates about racial justice and black, latino, and indigenous politics in the U.S. and Latin America. The aim of the course is to identify the contours and substantive problematics of U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, particularly as they relate to questions of racial justice. 

LAS 381 • Afr-Am & Latin Am Pol Thought

40410 • Spring 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as AFR 383, GOV 382M )
show description

Despite the current trend towards the study of comparative political theory, the work of Latin American political thinkers, which has been tremendously influential in their own region, remains marginal to the canon of Western political thought. Likewise, the work of U.S. African-American political thinkers is an important yet often overlooked strand of [U.S.] American political thought. This course is an an introduction to the history of these two traditions, and a comparative effort to understand the main thematics in each and the similarities and differences between them. It examines the answers U.S. African-American and Latin American thinkers have given to some of the fundamental preoccupations of political theory, as well as to other questions that have sometimes been viewed as marginal, such as: What is justice? What is freedom? What are the conditions of possibility for democratic politics? How should we theorize race? How should we conceive racial identity? What form should anti-racist politics take? The course will introduce students to some of the most influential figures in U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, including: Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Martí, José Vasconcelos, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, as well as to contemporary thinkers and debates about racial justice and black, latino, and indigenous politics in the U.S. and Latin America. The aim of the course is to identify the contours and substantive problematics of U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, particularly as they relate to questions of racial justice.

LAS 384L • Latin American Polit Thought

40355 • Fall 2010
Meets M 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as GOV 382M )
show description

Description: In spite of the tremendous influence that Latin American political thinkers have had in their own region, their work remains marginal to the canon of Western political theory. This course is an overview of the various traditions in the history of Latin American political thought. It examines the answers Latin American thinkers have given to some of the fundamental preoccupations of political theory from the perspective of the region’s social and political realities, such as: What is justice? What is the nature of the human? Under what conditions is popular sovereignty possible? What is the relationship between aesthetics and politics? What should be the relationship between religion and politics? How do we theorize culture and race? The course will introduce students to some of the most influential figures in Latin American political thought, including Bartolomé de las Casas, Simón Bolivar, Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Enrique Rodó, José Martí, José Vasconcelos, José Carlos Mariátegui, Ernesto ‘Ché’ Guevara, Gustavo Gutiérrez, as well as contemporary thinkers such as Walter Mignolo and Enrique Dussel. It will use this engagement with the history of political thought in Latin America to ask the following questions: To what extent can we say that there is a tradition of Latin American political thought? If so, what are its contours? What are the main problematics and principles of this tradition? To what extent does it reflect concerns specific to Latin America? To what extent does it speak to central questions in the canon of western political theory? How does it challenge the conceptual and methodological boundaries of that canon? And what, if any, is the difference between Latin American philosophy and Latin American political thought?


Grading Policy/Course Requirements:
Students will write three short (4 page) critical response essays about the readings.  
Students will also make one in-class presentation on the readings.
Final grades will be assessed based on three critical response essays (22% each for a total of 66%), in class presentation (18%), and class participation (16%).

Required Texts
1. Domingo F. Sarmiento, Facundo: Or, Civilization and Barbarism (Penguin Classics, 1998).
2. José Vasconcelos, The Cosmic Race (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997).
3. José Enrique Rodó, Ariel (University of Texas Press, 1998).
4. José Carlos Mariátegui, The Heroic and Creative Meaning of Socialism: Selected Essays of Jose Carlos Mariátegui (Humanity Books, 1996).
5. Gustavo Gutiérrez, A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics and Salvation (Orbis Books, 1998).
6. Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth (Grove Press, 2005).
Additional readings will be available through blackboard.

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