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Charles R. Hale, Director SRH 1.310, 2300 Red River Street D0800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512.471.5551

Susan Deans-Smith

Associate Professor Ph.D., Cambridge University

Associate Professor, Department of History
Susan Deans-Smith

Contact

Interests

history of Mexico; comparative colonialisms; Spanish empire; indigenous peoples

LAS 366 • Visual/Mat Cul: Col Lat Am

39710 • Spring 2015
Meets T 330pm-630pm PAR 302
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

This seminar focuses on the visual and material culture of colonial Spanish America. We will explore ways in which particular images and objects came into being and how they provide insights into the social, political, economic, religious, and intellectual histories of colonial Spanish America. We will explore and analyse a wide range of materials - paintings, sculptures, architecture, maps, textiles, prints, etc. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the connections between visual and material culture and the formation of the Ibero-American empires. At the core of this seminar is the deep contextualization of specific images and artifacts to understand how they came into being-who produced them, who wanted them and why, and what we can discover about their circulation, reception, and transformation. We will also consider how images and artifacts function as historical evidence to be interrogated in the same way that we critically assess written sources.

Texts:

1. Kelly Donahue-Wallace, Art and Architecture of Viceregal Latin America, 1521-1821

2. Matthew Restall and Kris Lane, Latin America in Colonial Times

3. DVD-Rom, Dana Leibsohn and Barbara E. Mundy, Vistas. Visual Culture in Spanish America, 1520-1820/Cultura visual de Hispanoamérica, 1520–1820

4. Class Reader

Grading:

•1. 25% five response papers of assigned readings

•2. 20% curated mini-exhibition project

•3. 5% Abstract and bibliography for final analytical essay

•4. 5%–peer critique of first drafts of analytical essay

•5. 10%–first drafts of final analytical essay             

•6. 25%–final analytical essay

•7. 10%–Attendance (5%) and active participation (5%)

LAS 366 • Rethinking Conquest Mexico

40655 • Fall 2014
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

This course explores the “conquest” of Mexico and the social, cultural, political, and economic processes which were set in motion by the Spanish invasion of Mexico. We will examine primary accounts of conquest (textual and visual) and the recent historical literature that interrogates the complexities of conquest and conquest society. How do we account for the Spanish military victory and for the consolidation of Spanish power in Mexico? What roles do the Catholic Church, Spanish settlers, and indigenous elites play in the consolidation of conquest society? What kind of society did the Spanish intend to establish in Mexico in the sixteenth century? In what ways is indigenous society (political structures and power relationships, gender relations, economic organization, religious practices and beliefs, etc.) affected by conquest? Conversely, how does indigenous society affect colonial policies and practices? How do we explain regional variations in indigenous insurrection in Mexico in the aftermath of conquest? The conquest of Mexico had global repercussions, not only in economic terms but also in cultural and intellectual terms. How did Spanish discovery of unknown peoples and places affect thinking about humanity and the world? How is the conquest currently represented in contemporary film and what do those interpretations tell us about resistant stereotypes of Spanish conquest?

Texts:

•           Ida Altman et al                                      The Early History of Greater Mexico

•           David Carrasco                                        Daily Life of the Aztecs

•           Daniel Castro                                          The Other Face of Empire

•           Ross Hassig                                           Mexico and the Spanish Conquest

•           Camilla Townsend                                  Malintzin’s Choices

•           Class Reader

Grading:

•           Informal response papers               10%

•           Analysis of primary sources                       15%

•           Critical reviews                                       35%

•           Analytical essay                          30%

•           Class Participation                                   10%

LAS 366 • Rel/Conq/Conv Col Mexico/Peru

40945 • Spring 2014
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as HIS 363K, R S 368 )
show description

This seminar focuses on the histories of the Catholic Church and religious devotion in colonial Latin America between 1521 and 1821. We will analyse the Church as an institution imbricated in colonial rule, its physical construction and presence in colonial Latin America, the secular and religious orders (including female religious), religious confraternities of the Spanish, indigenous, and African peoples, and the development of local devotions. Topics to be addressed include the relationship between the Catholic Church and the Spanish monarchy, and how it changed over 300 years of Spanish imperial rule, the early post-conquest work of friars among indigenous communities and their proto-anthropological characteristics, the influences of the Reconquista (the reclaiming of Christian Spain from Islamic rule and the expulsion of the Jewish population) upon the evangelization campaigns of the indigenous populations, and the enduring influences of pre-hispanic religious beliefs upon indigenous Catholic practices. We will also pay special attention to New World devotions that came into being during Spanish colonial rule and the question of how to understand the miraculous, the divine, and the mystical in colonial society. Particular emphasis will be placed on religious art and architecture as primary sources for thinking through and about these issues. Assignments include a combination of weekly informal writing responses, two short analytical essays, analysis of several primary sources, all of which will be used as the basis for a longer final research essay. A reading proficiency in Spanish is preferred but not mandatory.

Texts:

Inga Clendinnen, Ambivalent Conquests

William B. Taylor, Kenneth Mills, and Sandra Lauderdale-Graham, Colonial Latin America. A Documentary History

William B. Taylor, Marvels and Miracles in Late Colonial Mexico and Shrines & Miraculous Images. Religious Life in Mexico Before the Reforma

Gabriela Ramos, Death and Conversion in the Andes

Grading:

1. Informal weekly response paper 10%

2. Two short essays 30%

3. Analysis of primary sources 15%

4. Peer Review assignment 5%

5. Draft of research essay 10%

6. Final essay 20%

7. Seminar participation 10%

LAS 366 • Visual/Mat Cul In Col Latin Am

40955 • Spring 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

In this seminar we will focus on the visual and material culture of colonial Spanish America. We will explore ways in which particular images and objects came into being and how they provide insights into the social, political, economic, religious, and intellectual histories of colonial Spanish America. We will explore and analyse a wide range of materials - paintings, sculptures, architecture, maps, textiles, prints, etc. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the connections between visual and material culture and the formation of the Ibero-American empires. Emphasis will also be placed on the deep contextualization of specific images and artifacts to understand how they came into being-who produced them, who wanted them and why, and what we can discover about their circulation, reception, and transformation. We will also consider how images and artifacts function as historical evidence to be interrogated in the same way that we critically assess written sources.

 

Readings (**subject to confirmation)

1. Kelly Donahue-Wallace, Art and Architecture of Viceregal Latin America, 1521-1821

2. Matthew Restall and Kris Lane, Latin America in Colonial Times

3. DVD-Rom, Dana Leibsohn and Barbara E. Mundy, Vistas. Visual Culture in Spanish America, 1520-1820/Cultura visual de Hispanoamérica, 1520–1820

4. Class Reader

 

Grading:

•1. 25% five response papers of assigned readings

 

•2. 20% curated mini-exhibition project

 

•3. 5% Abstract and bibliography for final analytical essay

 

•4. 5%–peer critique of first drafts of analytical essay

 

•5. 10%–first drafts of final analytical essay              

 

•6. 25%–final analytical essay

 

•7. 10%–Attendance (5%) and active participation (5%)

LAS 386 • Imperial Formations

40990 • Fall 2013
Meets T 1230pm-330pm GAR 2.124
(also listed as HIS 386K )
show description

The main objectives of this readings seminar are to explore approaches to the history of empire in Spanish America from comparative, theoretical, and methodological approaches. We will examine questions related to theories of empire and to the development, consolidation, and break-up of the Spanish empire. Topics include the construction of imperial and colonial archives, the formation of colonial societies and socio-racial hierarchies, law and colonialism, religion and colonialism, church-state relations, colonial bureaucracies, colonial economies, class, gender and race relations, imperial imaginaries/visual and material culture, African and indigenous societies, intra/inter-imperial interactions and conflicts in a global context. Particular attention will be paid to comparisons of the Ibero-American empires with those of the British and French experiences.

 

Texts:

TBD

Class Reader

 

Grading:

Weekly review papers  50%

Draft of historiographical essay 10%

Final historiographical essay 30%

Seminar participation  10%

LAS 366 • Rel/Conq/Conv Col Mexico/Peru

40415 • Spring 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as HIS 363K )
show description

This seminar focuses on the histories of the Catholic Church and religious devotion in colonial Latin America between 1521 and 1821. We will analyse the Church as an institution imbricated in colonial rule, its physical construction and presence in colonial Latin America, the secular and religious orders (including female religious), religious confraternities of the Spanish, indigenous, and African peoples, and the development of local devotions. Topics to be addressed include the relationship between the Catholic Church and the Spanish monarchy, and how it changed over 300 years of Spanish imperial rule, the early post-conquest work of friars among indigenous communities and their proto-anthropological characteristics, the influences of the Reconquista (the reclaiming of Christian Spain from Islamic rule and the expulsion of the Jewish population) upon the evangelization campaigns of the indigenous populations, and the enduring influences of pre-hispanic religious beliefs upon indigenous Catholic practices. We will also pay special attention to New World devotions that came into being during Spanish colonial rule and the question of how to understand the miraculous, the divine, and the mystical in colonial society. Particular emphasis will be placed on religious art and architecture as primary sources for thinking through and about these issues. Assignments include a combination of weekly informal writing responses, two short analytical essays, analysis of several primary sources, all of which will be used as the basis for a longer final research essay. A reading proficiency in Spanish is preferred but not mandatory.

Grading:

1. Informal weekly response papers                 10%

2. Two short essays                                        30%

3. Analysis of primary sources                         15%

4. Peer Review assignment                               5%

5. Draft of research essay                               10%

6. Final essay                                                 20%

7. Seminar participation                                 10%

 

Texts (subject to confirmation):

Inga Clendinnen, Ambivalent Conquests

William B. Taylor, Kenneth Mills, and Sandra Lauderdale-Graham, Colonial Latin America. A Documentary History

William B. Taylor, Marvels and Miracles in Late Colonial Mexico and Shrines & Miraculous Images. Religious Life in Mexico Before the Reforma

Gabriela Ramos, Death and Conversion in the Andes

Class Reader

LAS 366 • Rethinking Conquest Of Mexico

40420 • Spring 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

This course explores the “conquest” of Mexico and the social, cultural, political, and economic processes which were set in motion by the Spanish invasion of Mexico. We will examine primary accounts of conquest (textual and visual) and the recent historical literature that interrogates the complexities of conquest and conquest society. How do we account for the Spanish military victory and for the consolidation of Spanish power in Mexico? What roles do the Catholic Church, Spanish settlers, and indigenous elites play in the consolidation of conquest society? What kind of society did the Spanish intend to establish in Mexico in the sixteenth century? In what ways is indigenous society (political structures and power relationships, gender relations, economic organization, religious practices and beliefs, etc.) affected by conquest? Conversely, how does indigenous society affect colonial policies and practices? How do we explain regional variations in indigenous insurrection in Mexico in the aftermath of conquest? The conquest of Mexico had global repercussions, not only in economic terms but also in cultural and intellectual terms. How did Spanish discovery of unknown peoples and places affect thinking about humanity and the world? How is the conquest currently represented in contemporary film and what do those interpretations tell us about resistant stereotypes of Spanish conquest?

Texts (subject to final confirmation):

  • Ida Altman et al                                       The Early History of Greater Mexico
  • David Carrasco                                        Daily Life of the Aztecs
  • Daniel Castro                                          The Other Face of Empire
  • Ross Hassig                                           Mexico and the Spanish Conquest
  • Camilla Townsend                                   Malintzin’s Choices
  • Class Reader

Grading:

  • Informal response papers                           10%
  • Analysis of primary sources                       15%
  • Critical reviews                                       35%
  • Analytical essay                                      30%
  • Class Participation                                   10%

LAS 366 • Visual/Mat Cul In Col Latin Am

40260 • Spring 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

In this seminar we will focus on the visual and material culture of colonial Latin America. We will explore ways in which particular images and objects came into being and how they provide insights into the social, political, economic, religious, and intellectual histories of colonial Latin America. We will explore and analyse a wide range of materials - paintings, sculptures, architecture, maps, textiles, prints, etc. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the connections between visual and material culture and the formation of the Ibero-American empires. Emphasis will also be placed on the deep contextualization of specific images and artifacts to understand how they came into being-who produced them, who wanted them and why, and what we can discover about their circulation, reception, and transformation. We will also consider how images and artifacts function as historical evidence to be interrogated in the same way that we critically assess written sources.

 

Grading:

Weekly response papers/peer review      30%

First draft of research paper           10%

Second draft of research paper  30%

Seminar presentation and participation  30%

 

Texts (subject to confirmation)

Class Reader

Kelly Donahue-Wallace, Art and Architecture of Viceregal Latin America

Dana Liebsohn and Barbara Mundy, Vistas. Visual Culture in Spanish America, 1520-1820 / Cultura visual de Hispanoamérica, 1520-1820

Serge Gruzinski, Images at War: Mexico from Columbus to Blade Runner Kenneth Mills et al, Colonial Latin America: A Documentary History

LAS 366 • Colonial Latin America

40190 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as HIS 346K )
show description

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the social, cultural, economic, and political development of colonial Spanish America between 1492 and 1840. Spanish imperial control over its American colonies lasted for three hundred years. How do we explain the longevity of Spanish control and when the Spanish American colonists fought for their independence why did the insurgent movements occur in the early nineteenth century and not before? Between Spanish invasion, conquest, and eventual loss of empire, what kind of societies were created in Spanish America? On what terms were the indigenous populations incorporated into conquest society and economy and what factors shaped their responses to Spanish colonialism? What images did the Spanish form of the "New World" inhabitants and what impact did they have upon Spanish intellectual thought? What type of society and economy did those Spaniards who sought their fortunes in the colonies shape for themselves and their descendants? Topics to be addressed include the Spanish and Pre-Colombian traditions of conquest and imperialism, the consolidation of Spanish imperial government in the so-called "New World", Church-State relations, the development of the colonial economies in the context of early globalization, race, class, and gender in colonial society, the movements of political independence from Spain and the problems faced by the new republics as emergent nation-states in the nineteenth century. Special emphasis will be placed on indigenous and Afro-American responses to Spanish colonialism during three centuries of imperial rule. Particular emphasis will also be placed on students’ critical readings of primary sources, both visual and textual.

 

Texts (subject to final confirmation):

•Jonathan C. Brown, Latin America. A Social History of the Colonial Period (2nd ed.)

• Daniel Castro, The Other Face of Empire

• Camilla Townsend, Malintzin’s Choices

• Karen Racine, Francisco de Miranda. A Transatlantic Life in the Age of Revolution

Class Reader

 

Grading:

Informal response papers 10%

Analysis of primary sources 20%

Critical reviews 60%

Class Participation 10%

LAS 366 • Rethinking Conquest Of Mexico

40580 • Spring 2011
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

HIS 350L

This course explores the “conquest” of Mexico and the social, cultural, political, and economic processes which were set in motion by the Spanish invasion of Mexico. We will examine primary accounts of conquest (textual and visual) and the recent historical literature that interrogates the complexities of conquest and conquest society. How do we account for the Spanish military victory and for the consolidation of Spanish power in Mexico? What roles do the Catholic Church, Spanish settlers, and indigenous elites play in the consolidation of conquest society? What kind of society did the Spanish intend to establish in Mexico in the sixteenth century? In what ways is indigenous society (political structures and power relationships, gender relations, economic organization, religious practices and beliefs, etc.) affected by conquest? Conversely, how does indigenous society affect colonial policies and practices? How do we explain regional variations in indigenous insurrection in Mexico in the aftermath of conquest? The conquest of Mexico had global repercussions, not only in economic terms but also in cultural and intellectual terms. How did Spanish discovery of unknown peoples and places affect thinking about humanity and the world? How is the conquest currently represented in contemporary film and what do those interpretations tell us about resistant stereotypes of Spanish conquest?

Texts (subject to final confirmation):

  • Ida Altman et al                                    The Early History of Greater Mexico
  • David Carrasco                                    Daily Life of the Aztecs
  • Daniel Castro                                    The Other Face of Empire
  • Ross Hassig                                                Mexico and the Spanish Conquest
  • Camilla Townsend                                    Malintzin’s Choices
  • Class Reader

Grading:

  • Informal response papers                        10%
  • Analysis of primary sources                        15%
  • Critical reviews                                    35%
  • Analytical essay                                    30%
  • Class Participation                                    10%

LAS 366 • Colonial Latin America

40590 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.120
(also listed as HIS 346K )
show description

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the social, cultural, economic, and political development of colonial Spanish America between 1492 and 1840. Spanish imperial control over its American colonies lasted for three hundred years. How do we explain the longevity of Spanish control and when the Spanish American colonists fought for their independence why did the insurgent movements occur in the early nineteenth century and not before? Between Spanish invasion, conquest, and eventual loss of empire, what kind of societies were created in Spanish America? On what terms were the indigenous populations incorporated into conquest society and economy and what factors shaped their responses to Spanish colonialism? What images did the Spanish form of the "New World" inhabitants and what impact did they have upon Spanish intellectual thought? What type of society and economy did those Spaniards who sought their fortunes in the colonies shape for themselves and their descendants? Topics to be addressed include the Spanish and Pre-Colombian traditions of conquest and imperialism, the consolidation of Spanish imperial government in the so-called "New World", Church-State relations, the development of the colonial economies in the context of early globalization, race, class, and gender in colonial society, the movements of political independence from Spain and the problems faced by the new republics as emergent nation-states in the nineteenth century. Special emphasis will be placed on indigenous and Afro-American responses to Spanish colonialism during three centuries of imperial rule. Particular emphasis will also be placed on students’ critical readings of primary sources, both visual and textual.

 

Texts (subject to final confirmation):

•Jonathan C. Brown, Latin America. A Social History of the Colonial Period (2nd ed.)

• Daniel Castro, The Other Face of Empire

• Camilla Townsend, Malintzin’s Choices

• Karen Racine, Francisco de Miranda. A Transatlantic Life in the Age of Revolution

Class Reader

 

Grading:

Informal response papers 10%

Analysis of primary sources 20%

Critical reviews 60%

Class Participation 10%

LAS 366 • Colonial Latin America

85240 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1130-100pm PAR 306
show description

Topics vary each semester to allow curriculum flexibility for faculty members and visiting scholars.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

LAS 366 • Rethink Conquest Of Mexico-W

39985 • Spring 2009
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 0.120
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

Topics vary each semester to allow curriculum flexibility for faculty members and visiting scholars.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Publications

Book

Bureaucrats, Planters, and Workers - the Making of the Tobacco Monopoly in Bourbon Mexico (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1992).

Ilona Katzew and Susan Deans-Smith eds., Race and Classification. The Case of Mexican America (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009)

Susan Deans-Smith and Eric Van Young eds., Mexican Soundings: Essays In Honour of David A. Brading (London: Institute for the Study of the Americas, 2007)

Articles

    "'A Natural and Voluntary Dependence': The Royal Academy of San Carlos and the Cultural Politics of Art Education in Mexico City, 1786-1797." Bulletin of Latin American Research,  (2010)

    oSusan Deans-Smith and Ilona Katzew, "Introduction. The Alchemy of Race in Mexican America," in Ilona Katzew and Susan Deans-Smith eds., Race and Classification. The Case of Mexican America (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009): 1-24

"Dishonor in the Hands of Indians, Spaniards, and Blacks": Painters and the (Racial) Politics of Painting in Early Modern Mexico" in Ilona Katzew and Susan Deans-Smith eds., Race and Classification. The Case of Mexican America (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009): 43-72

"This Noble and Illustrious Art": Painters and the Politics of Guild Reform in Early Modern Mexico City." In Mexican Soundings: Essays In Honor of David A. Brading, eds., Susan Deans-Smith and Eric Van Young (London: Brookings Institute Press, 2007): 67-98

"Creating the Colonial Subject: Casta Paintings, Curiosities and Collectors in Eighteenth Century Mexico and Spain." Colonial Latin American Review, vol. 14 2 (December) 2005: 169-204

"Native Peoples of the Gulf Coast from the Colonial Period to the Present," in The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas (MesoAmerica) Vol. II, Part 2 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000): 274-302

"The Arena of Dispute," in Mexico's New Cultural History ¿Una Lucha Libre? eds. Susan Deans-Smith and Gil Joseph (Duke University Press, 1999): 203-208 (Special Issue of the Hispanic American Historical Review, 79, No. 2)

 "Gender, Morality and Work Discipline - the Working Poor, Public Order, and the Colonial State in Eighteenth Century Mexico," in Rituals of Rule, Rituals of Resistance: Public Celebrations and Popular Culture in Mexico, eds. William H. Beezely, Cheryl E. Martin, and William E. French (Scholarly Resources, Inc., 1994): 47-77

"Culture, Power, and Society in Colonial Mexico," Latin American Research Review 33, No. 1 (1998): 257-277

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