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Charles R. Hale, Director SRH 1.310, 2300 Red River Street D0800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512.471.5551

David C. Warner

Professor Ph.D., Syracuse University

Wilbur J. Cohen Professor in Health and Social Policy, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs

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Interests

economics; health policy; health finance

LAS 381 • Border Health Policy

40292 • Fall 2010
Meets T 600pm-900pm
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Course Overview

Topics for these policy seminars have included environmental and natural resources policy, health-service delivery policy, transportation policy, science policy, regulatory policy, international affairs, national security, labor and human relations policy, social welfare policy, urban and regional growth policy, intergovernmental relations, and public sector ethics and values.

Section Description

This is a collaborative course between the LBJ School of Public Affairs and The University of Texas School of Public Health.   Lectures will be offered via interactive television from   the  Austin, and El Paso Regional campus of the School of Public Health. There may be participants in Houston as well. Instructors will be Nuria Homedes who is a professor at the UT School of Public Health campus in El Paso and David Warner who is a professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at UT Austin.

Objectives:
This course examines the history of US-Mexico relations and health policy with an emphasis on issues on the border. Specific issues include  the control of transmissible diseases across an international border, such as tuberculosis, HIV-AIDS, and rabies; health conditions specific to the region; opportunities and constraints in the organization of health services and access to health care; environmental problems and sanitation initiatives; contrasting perceptions of health priorities by Mexican and US decision-makers; and the impact of NAFTA on health.  We will also explore the experiences of different bi-national initiatives and national programs aimed at enhancing the health status of border populations.  An emerging theme will be Mexican and US separate attempts to guarantee coverage for health services on a national level and issues related to an undocumented or recently immigrated population that is uncovered in either system. 

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