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Charles R. Hale, Director SRH 1.310, 2300 Red River Street D0800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512.471.5551

Kurt Weyland

Professor Ph.D., Stanford University

Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Endowed Professor in Latin American Politics, Department of Government
Kurt Weyland

Contact

Interests

democratization; diffusion; social policy; populism; bounded rationality; market reform

LAS 337M • Intnatl Politics Latin Amer

39665 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as GOV 337M )
show description

Kurt Weyland

 

 

GOV 337M/LAS 337 – unique 37925/39665: International Politics of Latin America

 

Course description:

 

This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging, theoretically informed perspective. The first week will introduce a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War); we will focus on emblematic cases, such as Mexico (1910s), Guatemala (1954), Cuba (1959 ff), Chile (1970-73), Grenada (1983) & Panama (1989). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has international economic integration (e.g., NAFTA) changed the region’s insertion into the international economic and political system? Finally, the last third of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drugs and (other) international criminal activities; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?

 

 

Grading:

 

1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance rule & policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

 

 

Texts:

 

Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, paperback edition, 2012.

 

Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.

 

Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008.

 

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

 

Pls. note: The readings will amount to about 100 pp. of material per week.

LAS 337M • Intnatl Politics Latin Amer

40915 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as GOV 337M )
show description

 Course description:

 This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging, theoretically informed perspective. The first week will introduce a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has international economic integration (e.g., NAFTA) changed the region’s insertion into the international economic and political system? Finally, the last third of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drugs and (other) international criminal activities; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?

 

 Grading:

 1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

 

 Texts:

 

Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, paperback edition, 2012.

 

Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.

 

Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008.

 

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

 

The readings will amount to about 100 pp. of material per week.

LAS 337M • Intnatl Politics Of Latin Amer

40385 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as GOV 337M )
show description

Course Description:

This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging, theoretically informed perspective. The first week will introduce a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has international economic integration (e.g.,, NAFTA) changed the region’s insertion into the international economy and political system? Finally, the last third of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drugs and (other) international criminal activities; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?

 

Grading Policy:

1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

 

Texts:

Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, paperback edition, 2012.

Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.

Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008.

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

The readings will amount to about 100 pp. of material per wee

LAS 337M • Intnatl Politics Of Latin Amer

40215 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm WAG 214
(also listed as GOV 337M )
show description

Course description:

This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging perspective. The first week will introduce a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has the wave of market-oriented reforms changed the region’s insertion into the international economy and political system? Finally, the last third of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drugs and (other) international criminal activities; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?

Grading:

1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

Texts:

Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, 2008.

Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.

Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008.

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

The readings will amount to 80-100 pp. of material per week.

LAS 337M • Intnatl Politics Of Latin Amer

40530 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 134
(also listed as GOV 337M )
show description

Course description:This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging perspective. The first week will introduce a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has the wave of market-oriented reforms changed the region’s insertion into the international economy and political system? Finally, the last third of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drugs and (other) international criminal activities; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?Grading:1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.Texts:Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, 2008.Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008. Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chaptersThe readings will amount to 80-100 pp. of material per week.

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