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Charles R. Hale, Director SRH 1.310, 2300 Red River Street D0800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512.471.5551

Renowned Historians of Mexico to Speak at UT

Posted: April 5, 2010
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The Mexican Center of LLILAS is hosting an April 14 panel, Independence, Revolution, and Nation-State Formation in Mexico, with renowned Mexicanist historians Alan Knight, Erika Pani, and Eric Van Young. The panelists will examine how Mexican Independence and the Revolution of 1910 forged the identity of the modern Mexican state.

The panel is part of the ongoing series Many Mexicos, organized by the Mexican Center to commemorate the bicentennial of Mexican Independence (1810) and the centennial of the Mexican Revolution (1910). The panel will take place at the University of Texas on Wednesday, April 14, 2010, from 3:30–5:30 p.m. in the Sinclair Suite, Texas Union 3.128, and is free and open to the public. The panelists will discuss historical interpretations and debates about the pivotal turning points in Mexican history—its fight for Independence unleashed in 1810, the challenges of nation-state formation in the nineteenth century, and the Revolution of 1910.
 
Alan Knight is Professor of Latin American History at the University of Oxford and a former faculty member of the UT Department of History. He is currently editor of the Cambridge Latin American Studies Series and is author of the two-volume study The Mexican Revolution (1986). Erika Pani is a research professor in the Centro de Estudios Históricos at El Colegio de México in Mexico City. Her recent publications include El Segundo Imperio: Pasados de usos múltiples (2004) and Conservadurismos y derechas en la historia de México (2009). Eric Van Young is Distinguished Professor of History at the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of The Other Rebellion: Popular Violence, Ideology, and the Struggle for Mexican Independence, 1810–1821 (2001).
 
Dr. Susan Deans-Smith, Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas and coordinator of the Many Mexicos series, will moderate the panel.
 
For more information about the symposium or the Many Mexicos series, visit Mexico 2010.

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