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Charles R. Hale, Director SRH 1.310, 2300 Red River Street D0800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512.471.5551

Tinker Visiting Professor

The University of Texas at Austin is one of five major universities (with Chicago, Columbia, Stanford, and Wisconsin) to have a professorship endowed by the Edward Larocque Tinker Foundation. The goal of the Tinker Visiting Professor program has been to bring pre-eminent thinkers from Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula to the United States as a means of encouraging contact and collaboration among scholars. A Tinker Visiting Professor is expected to provide an opportunity for U.S. scholars, students and the general public to discover the contributions made by Latin American and Iberian scholars in a broad range of disciplines and, therefore, must be a citizen of an Ibero-American country, Canada, Spain or Portugal. Canadian candidates must be Latin Americanists.

A Tinker Visiting Professor is a scholar or professional (journalist, architect, judge, etc.) who has gained prominence and recognition for contributions to his/her field and not just a promising newcomer.

The Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS) administers the Tinker Professor Program. Nominations for this professorship must come from chairs of UT Austin departments.

For more information, contact Heather Gatlin at 512.471.8593.

Fall 2013

Pablo de Larrañaga
Pablo de Larrañaga is Professor of Law at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM) in Mexico City and Director of the Program in Regulation, Infrastructure, and Development and of the LLM in administrative law and regulation at ITAM. He received a PhD in law and a diploma in European Union studies from the University of Alicante, Spain, an LLM in legal theory from the European Academy of Legal Theory in Brussels, and an LLB from ITAM. Dr. Larrañaga’s research expertise includes Mexican public law, constitutional law, regulation, globalization, and economic law. His recent publications include the book Regulación:  Técnica jurídica y razonamiento económico (Mexico City: Ed. Porrua, 2009) and the forthcoming book Metodología de la mejora regulatoria (Mexico City: Dofiscal, 2013). Dr. Larrañaga is a member of the National System of Researchers and has been a visiting scholar and researcher at a number of universities internationally, including Harvard Law School, Genoa University, Katholieke Universiteit Brussel, and Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona. He will teach two courses in Fall 2013, a LLILAS graduate seminar, Latin American Market Systems, and a Law School seminar, Mexican Public Law. 

Magdalena Villarreal
Magdalena Villarreal is Senior Researcher and Professor at the Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social (CIESAS) Occidente in Guadalajara, Mexico. She is currently co-director of two research projects: one on poverty and aging in collaboration with the Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores Occidente (ITESO) at the Universidad Jesuita de Guadalajara, and one on financial practices in Mexican and Indian rural communities with the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Villarreal received a PhD in the sociology of rural development and an MSC in the management of agricultural knowledge systems from Wageningen University, The Netherlands, and a BA in history from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Her research expertise includes poverty, indigenous issues, finance and development issues, migration and human rights, social policy, and gender issues. Her recent publications include “Cashing Identities: Debt in the Non-material World of Money among Rural Mexicans,” and “Introduction. Defying Poverty: Myths of Economic Control and Power” in Paerregaard, Karsten, and Webster (eds.), The Byways of the Poor: Organizing Practices and Economic Control in the Developing World (Denmark: Museum Tusculanum Press, 2012), and a coauthored article, “About Calculations and Social Currencies: Indigenous Households’ Financial Practices in the Highlands of Chiapas.” Dr. Villarreal is a member of the Academia Mexicana de Ciencias (AMC); she has worked as a consultant internationally and was a visiting professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She will teach the graduate seminar Poverty in the Age of Financialization during Fall 2013.

Spring 2013

Jorge Mario Sánchez Egozcue
Jorge Mario Sánchez Egozcue holds a PhD in international economics from the Universidad de La Habana, where he has been a researcher and Professor of International Relations and Economics since 1990. He previously worked at the Centro de Estudios Hemisféricos y sobre Estados Unidos (CESEU) from 1990–2010 and has worked at the Centro de Estudios de la Economía Cubana (CEEC) since 2010. Throughout his career, Dr. Sánchez has carried out research on the political and economic aspects of international relations between Latin America and the United States, Canada, and Europe, as well as research on the macroeconomic policies, commerce, and development of the Cuban economy. He also has worked as a specialist for the Cuban Ministries of Public Health, Basic Industry, and the Central Board of Economics. Dr. Sánchez has published numerous articles, most recently, “United States–Cuba Economic Relations: The Pending Normalization,” which was featured in the book Debating U.S.-Cuban Relations, published in 2012. He has served as a visiting professor and visiting researcher at numerous universities across the globe, including Harvard, Columbia, Georgetown, and American universities in the U.S.; the Université de Paris III Sorbonne Nouvelle in France; Trent, Hamilton, and Carleton universities in Canada; and El Colegio de México and the Universidad de Guadalajara in Mexico. During his visit to UT, Dr. Sánchez will teach the graduate class Latin American Economics and Development.

Fall 2012

Teófilo Altamirano
Teófilo Altamirano, who holds PhDs in anthropology from the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima, Peru, and the University of Durham in England, has been Professor of Social Science at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru since 1989. Throughout his career, Dr. Altamirano has carried out research on emigration from the Andean region, Andean migrants in the United States and Europe, and conditions of urban poverty and inequality. His most recent research on climate change and migration provides a framework for understanding the consequences of climate change in the most vulnerable rural and urban areas of Latin America. Dr. Altamirano also has worked as a consultant to the World Bank and the International Organization for Migration on issues of internal migration and development in Andean countries, the Peruvian international migrant profile, and indigenous populations in Peru, Mexico, Ecuador, and Bolivia. He has published thirteen books, his most recent Refugiados ambientales: Cambio climatico y desplazamiento humano, published in 2012 by CISEPA-UNFPA.  Dr. Altamirano has served as a visiting professor and visiting researcher at numerous universities across the globe, including Oxford University, the University of Winnipeg in Canada, the Universidad del País Vasco in Spain, the University of Florida and the University of Arkansas (both as Fulbright visiting professor), and the University of Michigan. Dr. Altamirano is fluent in English, Spanish, and Quechua. During his visit to UT, he will teach the graduate class Climate Change and Migration.

Fall 2011

Juan Darío Restrepo
Juan Darío Restrepo holds a PhD from the Marine Science Program at the University of South Carolina. In his work since then, he has continued to carry out research on the environmental oceanography of deltas, estuaries, and coastal lagoons waters, especially on the factors controlling water discharge, sediment load, and dissolved load to the ocean from the Pacific and Caribbean rivers of Colombia. His research focuses on improving the understanding of the natural and anthropogenic causes affecting denudation rates and sediment transport to the Caribbean Sea from the largest fluvial system of Colombia, the Magdalena River. Dr. Restrepo has been head of the Magdalena River Science Initiative in Colombia and is currently a full Professor of Geological Sciences at EAFIT University, Colombia. He has been involved as a resource scientist for the sub-programs of LOICZ-IGBP Basins, SAmBas (South American Basins), and CariBas (Caribbean Basins), and also as a member of the Scientific Steering Committees of LOICZ-IGBP and Colciencias (Colombia) in the Marine Science Program. Dr. Restropo is a coauthor of the Coastal Communities and Systems and Caribbean Assessment chapters of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) and a visiting professor of the European Union in the master's program Water and Coastal Management. He is also a visiting scientist at the University of Colorado at Boulder (2009–2011), and a consultant of the International Water Project (United Nations University and Global Environmental Fund, GEF). During his visit to UT, he will teach the class Environmental Data Analysis: Applications in Latin America.

Spring 2011

Jacinto Rodríguez
Jacinto Rodríguez received his MA in Spanish American literature from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in 2000. A practicing journalist who has gained a national reputation for his writing on Mexican politics and the press, he currently works as coordinator of the program Prensa y Democracia at the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City, where he lectures on journalist rights, the press and politics in Mexico, and the role of Mexican intelligence in Mexico’s dirty war of the 1960s and 1970s. He has written for such newspapers and magazines as El Universal, Emeequis, Milenio, and Proceso and is the author most recently of the books La otra guerra secreta: Los archivos prohibidos de la prensa y el poder and Las nóminas secretas de gobernación: Una investigación sobre los aparatos de inteligencia en los años de guerra sucia en México. During spring 2011, he will teach the graduate seminar Secret Relationships: The Press and Political Power in Mexico.


View video of Tinker Visiting Professor Jacinto Rodríguez (Video produced by Camilo Romero).

Fall 2009

Francisco Thoumi
Francisco Thoumi received a PhD in economics from the University of Minnesota and an BA from the Universidad de Los Andes, Colombia. After working for several decades on international trade, Latin American integration, and economic development and industrialization, he began focusing his research on drugs to better understand what was taking place in the Andean countries. He uses a multidisciplinary approach as a basis for policy analysis. Dr. Thoumi’s main research has been on the competitive advantage of coca- and poppy-growing countries. He has worked on the issue of drugs in Colombia, Bolivia, Peru, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. During 1999–2000, he was a Research Coordinator for the UN Program Against Money Laundering and also coordinated publication of the World Drug Report, 2000. His outstanding research has been funded by the UN Research Institute for Social Development, UNDP, and the Open Society Institute. During his fall 2009 visit, Dr. Thoumi taught the course Political Economy and Social Problems of Illegal Drugs in the Andes (and Other Countries): A Multidisciplinary Approach.

Spring 2009

Rafael Rojas

Dr. Rojas, a specialist in Cuban intellectual history, holds a PhD in history from El Colegio de México as well as degrees from the Universidad de La Habana and UNAM in Mexico. He has published thirteen single-author books, among them Cuban Intellectual History, Cuba mexicana: Historia de una anexión, and La política de adiós, as well as numerous articles and book chapters covering the nineteenth century to the present. Dr. Rojas is a professor at the Centro de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas (CIDE) in Mexico City. During 2007, he was a visiting professor at both Princeton and Columbia University.

Previous Tinker Professors (PDF, 90K)
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