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Wayne Rebhorn & Frank Whigham, Directors 208 W. 21st Street B5000, PAR 115 78712 • 512-232-2483

Renaissance Faculty


          

J.K. Barret
Mary Blockley
Douglas Bruster
Elizabeth Cullingford

Alan Friedman
Coleman Hutchison
Jenna Lay
James Loehlin

Eric S. Mallin
Su Fang Ng
Jason Powell
Wayne Rebhorn

Elizabeth Richmond-Garza
John Rumrich
Frank Whigham
Hannah Chapelle Wojciehowski
JK Barret
J.K. BARRET received her Ph.D. from Princeton University and her B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. Her first book project, "So Written to Aftertimes": Renaissance England's Poetics of Futurity," investigates Renaissance literary constructions of the future, the complex relations between futurity and narrative, and the emergence of novel accounts of Englishness that turn on looking to the future rather than the past in the works of Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare and Milton. She has received fellowship support from sources including the UT Austin, the Whiting Foundation, the Josephine de Kármán Foundation, and the Huntington Library. She has also received funding to participate in seminars at the National Humanities Center and the Folger Shakespeare Library. In addition to time and the future, her research and teaching interests include poetry and poetics, literature and the visual arts, early modern legal theory, antiquity in the Renaissance, pastoral, romance, translation studies and narrative theory. (Email: jkbarret@mail.utexas.edu)
MARY BLOCKLEY conducts research in the history of the English language from Old English to the present, and has taught since 1987 a graduate seminar in the linguistics of Early Modern English from approximately 1500-1700, looking at the literary consequences of such phenomena as the rise of auxiliary do, the passive progressive, epistemic verbs, phrasal verbs, singular you, and the Great Vowel Shift. She has presented work on the history of English at ICEHL, SHEL, MLA, and ADS. Her primary field is Old English philology, where her publications include articles in Speculum, RES, and Modern Philology and a book, Aspects of Old English Poetic Syntax: Where Clauses Begin (Illinois 2001). She has been an NEH fellow, and a visiting professor in Northern Ireland and LMU-Munich. (Email: blockley@mail.utexas.edu) Mary Blockley
Douglas Bruster
DOUGLAS BRUSTER works on Renaissance drama, emphasizing the historical and social implications of literary form. He recently edited Everyman and Mankind with Eric Rasmussen for the Arden Early Modern Drama series, and Middleton's The Changeling for the Oxford Middleton. His other books include Drama and the Market in the Age of Shakespeare (Cambridge 1992), a study of the theater's relationship to the market; Quoting Shakespeare (Nebraska 2000), a historical examination of intertextuality; Shakespeare and the Question of Culture (Palgrave 2003), which scrutinizes the "cultural turn" in the early modern era; and To Be or Not To Be (Continuum 2007), a close examination of Hamlet's famous speech. With Robert Weimann he has written Prologues to Shakespeare's Theatre (Routledge 2004), a study of the Elizabethan prologue; and Shakespeare and the Power of Performance (Cambridge 2008), an analysis of stage and page in the early modern playhouse. He has taught at Harvard University, the University of Chicago, and the University of Paris. (Email: bruster@mail.utexas.edu)
ELIZABETH BUTLER CULLINGFORD is Jane and Roland Blumberg Professor in English Literature and University Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. She is currently serving as the Chair of the English Department. Her publications include Ireland's Others: Ethnicity and Gender in Irish Literature and Popular Culture, 2001; Gender and History in Yeats's Love Poetry, 1993 and Yeats, Ireland and Fascism, 1981. She is studying representations of child abuse in Irish-American drama and film, and working on a feminist cultural studies project analyzing literary depictions of the only child in the contexts provided by folklore, history, religion, demography, and sociology. (Email: cullingford@austin.utexas.edu) Elizabeth Cullingford
Alan Friedman

ALAN FRIEDMAN, Thaman Professor of English and Comparative Literature, specializes in twentieth-century British and American literature. He regularly teaches a seminar on Shakespeare in Performance; coordinates a residency program, Actors From The London Stage (a troupe of five British actors that come to UT each fall to teach classes and workshops and perform a Shakespeare play); and directs a student organization, Spirit of Shakespeare (which performs scenes from the AFTLS play throughout the year). His six authored books include Party Pieces: Oral Storytelling and Social Performance in Joyce and Beckett (2007) and Fictional Death and the Modernist Enterprise (1995; reprinted 2008). His six edited books include Beckett in Black and Red: The Translations for Nancy Cunard's Negro plus four co-edited journal issues on Joyce and Beckett. He has published essays on Hamlet and Marlowe's Jew of Malta; forthcoming is an encyclopedia entry on The Merchant of Venice for The Shakespeare Encyclopedia.
(Email: friedman@mail.utexas.edu)
COLEMAN HUTCHISON (Ph.D., Northwestern, 2006) teaches and writes about U.S. literature and culture to 1900. His essays have appeared in American Literary History, Comparative American Studies, The Emily Dickinson Journal, and PMLA, and he is currently completing a book about Confederate literary culture. Although an Americanist by training, Hutchison has abiding interests in the Renaissance book, seventeenth-century transatlantic poetry, and the sonnet. (Email: coleman.hutchison@mail.utexas.edu) Coleman Hutchison
Jenna Lay
JENNA LAY joins the UT Department of English for a year of postdoctoral study.  She works on early modern English literature, with a particular focus on religious and political culture. She received her Ph.D. from Stanford University and her B.A. from SUNY Buffalo. Her first book project, "Beyond the Cloister: Catholic Englishwomen and Early Modern Book Culture," explores representations of nuns and recusant women in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature. The archival work for this project has been supported by fellowships from Stanford University, the Institute for Historical Research in London, the Huntington Library, and the Renaissance Society of America. Her other research and teaching interests include women's writing, book history, post-Restoration republicanism, and the early modern rhetoric of fancy and reason. (Email: jennalay@stanford.edu)
JAMES LOEHLIN is Shakespeare at Winedale Regents Professor of English. His scholarship focuses on the history of plays in performance. He has written widely about Shakespeare on stage and film, especially the history plays (he has books on Henry IV and Henry V and articles on Henry VI and Richard III). He also works with modern drama, in particular the works of Anton Chekhov (he has a book on The Cherry Orchard). As Director of the Shakespeare at Winedale program, he works with performance as a teaching method; he has directed forty productions of Shakespeare's plays. He holds degrees from the Universities of Texas, Oxford and Stanford. He has received several awards for teaching, including membership in the UT Academy of Distinguished Teachers. (Email: JNLoehlin@mail.utexas.edu) James Loehlin
Eric Mallin
ERIC S. MALLIN, Associate Professor of English, has taught at UT since 1987. He has received several teaching awards, including the President's Associates' and the Texas Exes' honors. He is the author of Godless Shakespeare (Continuum, 2007) and Inscribing the Time: Shakespeare and the End of Elizabethan England (University of California Press, 1996); and he has authored a pedagogical game based on the competition between acting troupes and their writers in early modern England, called Playing for Fame: Shakespeare and Marlowe, 1592 (forthcoming, Longman's). He specializes in Shakespeare, cinema, and the nexus of sexuality and religion in the English Renaissance and beyond. Currently, he is researching a project on the idea of perversity in the literary imagination.
SU FANG NG, an associate professor of English at the University of Oklahoma, works on the early modern period with a secondary interest in postcolonialism. She is visiting UT as a Harrington Fellow this year. Her first book, Literature and the Politics of Family in Seventeenth-Century England (Cambridge, 2007), examines how the putatively conservative family-state analogy could be used for radical political ends. Her current project, "Global Renaissance: Early Modern Classicism and Empire from the British Isles to the Malay Archipelago," analyzes the appropriation of Alexander the Great by Britons and Southeast Asians in order to reconsider English relations with Southeast Asians arising from the East Indies spice trade. Her work has won support from the Radcliffe Institute, the National Humanities Center, the American Philosophical Society, the British Academy, and the Newberry Library.
(Email: ngsf@ou.edu)
Su Fang Ng
Jason Powell
JASON POWELL was an undergraduate at Trinity University in San Antonio and a doctoral student at University College, Oxford. His two-volume edition of Thomas Wyatt's complete works, now under contract with Oxford University Press, has been supported by a Fellowship and Summer Stipend from the NEH, and by short-term fellowships and grants from the Harry Ransom Center, the Huntington Library, the American Philosophical Society, and the British Academy. Now a Harrington Fellow at UT and an assistant professor at St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia, he is also working toward a monograph on Tudor literature and diplomacy (including works by More, Wyatt, Sidney and Shakespeare) and on other projects related to the transmission of Henrician literature in manuscript and print. (Email: jpowell@sju.edu)
WAYNE REBHORN'S scholarship explores the social, political, philosophical, and religious dimensions of literature and rhetoric in the European Renaissance. Working in three fields -- the literatures of the English Renaissance and of the European Renaissance as well as Renaissance rhetoric -- he has produced seven books as author, editor and translator, and written more than twenty-five articles on writers from Petrarch and Boccaccio through Erasmus, More, Castiglione, and Rabelais, down to Shakespeare, Milton, and Molière. His many awards include fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the Guggenheim Foundation, and his Foxes and Lions: Machiavelli's Confidence Men received the Howard R. Marraro Prize of the Modern Language Association of America in 1990. He is currently working on a translation of Boccaccio's Decameron for W. W. Norton & Co.
(Email: warebhorn@mail.utexas.edu)
Wayne Rebhorn
Elizabeth Richmond-Garza
ELIZABETH RICHMOND-GARZA is Associate Professor of English and Director of the Program in Comparative Literature, and chief administrative/financial officer of the American Comparative Literature Association. She holds degrees from U. C. Berkeley, Oxford University, and Columbia University. She is finishing a study of decadent culture at the end of the nineteenth century. Research interests: Orientalism, the Gothic, Cleopatra, Oscar Wilde, and European drama. Awards: Chad Oliver Plan II Teaching Award; 16th annual Friar Centennial Teaching Fellowship; Minnie Piper Stevens Teaching Award;  Academy of Distinguished Teachers (2004); Regents' Outstanding Teaching Award (2009). (Email: emrg@mail.utexas.edu)
JOHN RUMRICH teaches the works of John Milton in their political and religious setting, seventeenth-century British poetry to the Restoration, as well as Shakespeare's plays and the cultural and literary traditions that inform them. An NEH fellow (1990-91) and editor of Texas Studies in Literature and Language (1992-2007), he has been a visiting professor in China, France, Ireland, and South Africa.  Supported by grants from the Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Services (2005-8), he led in the design of a book-based audiotext interface that has become a standard instructional resource.  Recent publications include The Norton Critical Edition of Seventeenth-Century British Poetry (2006) and The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton (2007). (Email: rumrich@mail.utexas.edu) John Rumrich
Frank Whigham
FRANK WHIGHAM works on early modern British literature and culture. One of the original group of California theorists who came to be known as the New Historicists, his essays have appeared in many journals and collections, including PMLA, ELH, NLH, and Renaissance Drama, on subjects ranging from Webster's Duchess of Malfi to the rhetoric of early modern English letters of recommendation. He is the author of Ambition and Privilege (California 1984), Seizures of the Will (Cambridge 1996), and a new edition of George Puttenham's Art of English Poesy, co-edited with Wayne Rebhorn (Cornell 2007). He established the Digital Archive Services database of still images, and is now the founding co-director of the Texas Institute for Literary and Textual Studies. (Email: ffw@mail.utexas.edu)
HANNAH CHAPELLE WOJCIEHOWSKI is a Comparative Literature scholar specializing in sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century writings, and the history of literary theory. She received her graduate degrees from the interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies Program at Yale University. Her current research interests include the global sixteenth century, comparative colonialisms, early modern science, technology and culture, feminist and gender studies, and psychoanalytic approaches to literary studies. The author of Old Masters, New Subjects: Early Modern and Poststructuralist Theories of Will (Stanford University Press, 1995), as well as articles on Shakespeare, More, Galileo, Veronica Franco, Petrarch, and other authors, she has recently finished a book entitled "The Collective Unbound: Transculturation and Its Metaphors in the Renaissance." Currently she is working on a performance-oriented edition of Shakespeare's Cymbeline (Focus/Pullins, 2010). (Email: gemelli@mail.utexas.edu) Hannah Chapelle Wojciehowski
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