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Poets & Scholars

Spring Keynote Poets & Scholars

MARILYNMarilyn Hacker is the author of twelve books of poems, including Names (Norton, 2010), Essays on Departure (Carcanet Press, 2006), and Desesperanto (Norton, 2003). Her essay collection Unauthorized Voices was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2010. Her eleven volumes of translations from the French include Marie Etienne’s King of a Hundred Horsemen (Farrar Strauss and Giroux, 2008), which received the 2007 Robert Fagles Translation Prize and the 2009 American PEN Award for Poetry in Translation, Hédi Kaddour’s Treason (Yale, 2010), and Vénus Khoury-Ghata’s Nettles (The Graywolf Press, 2008). For her own work, she is a past recipient of the Lenore Marshall Award for Winter Numbers, the Poets’ Prize for Selected Poems, the National Book Award for Presentation Piece, an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2004 and the American PEN Voelcker Award for poetry in 2010. She is a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. She lives in Paris. Read a poem. Read an interview.

Jennifer DeVere Brody is a Professor in Drama and an Affiliate in the Center for Comparative Studies of Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University. Her work has appeared in Theatre Journal, Signs, Genders, Callaloo, Text and Performance Quarterly and in several edited volumes. Her books, Impossible Purities (Duke University Press, 1998) and Punctuation: Art, Politics and Play (Duke University Press, 2008) both discuss relations among and between sexuality, gender, racialization, visual studies and performance. She has served as the President of the Women and Theatre Program, and her work has been supported by the Ford and Mellon Foundations. She received the Monette-Horwitz Prize for Independent Research Against Homophobia and was the Board of Visitors Research & Teaching Professor at Northwestern. Her research and teaching focus on performance, aesthetics, politics and subjectivity as well as feminist theory, queer studies and contemporary cultural studies. Currently, she is working with colleagues on the re-publication of James Baldwin’s illustrated book, Little Man, Little Man and writing a new book about the intersections of sculpture and performance.

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Fall Keynote Poets & Scholars


MullenHarryette Mullen is a Fellow of the Academy of American Poets and the author of many award-winning books, including Tree Tall Woman (Energy Earth Communications, 1981), Trimmings (Tender Buttons, 1991), S*PeRM**K*T (Singing Horse Press, 1992), and Muse & Drudge (Singing Horse Press, 1995). Now a Professor of English at the University of California-Los Angeles, Professor Mullen is a graduate of the University of Texas Department of English. Read a poem.




RampersadArnold Rampersad is the Sara Hart Kimball Professor Emeritus in the Humanities at Stanford University, where he teaches in the Department of English. For three years at Stanford he also served as Senior Associate Dean for the Humanities. He is the prize-winning author or editor of more than a dozen books mainly about African American life and culture, with an emphasis on biography and autobiography. These include full-length studies of the lives of Langston Hughes, Jackie Robinson, and Ralph Ellison, as well as The Art and Imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois (Harvard, 1976), a pioneering intellectual biography of arguably the most influential African American thinker. With the late tennis star Arthur Ashe he co-wrote Days of Grace: A Memoir (Knopf, 1993), about Ashe’s life and his opinions on matters such as race, education, sports, politics, international affairs (especially South Africa and Haiti), and the scourge of AIDS, from which Ashe died.
      Professor Rampersad has edited, among various other volumes, The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes (Knopf, 1994) and a book of essays on Richard Wright. He has also published many essays in publications such as the New York Times, The New Republic, and American Literature. Twice a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in biography, he has also been honored as a finalist once by the National Book Award organization and twice by the National Book Critics Circle.
      Born in Trinidad and Tobago, where he attended high school at St. Mary’s College, Professor Rampersad earned undergraduate and graduate degrees in English and American literature from Bowling Green State University and Harvard University. After receiving his doctorate from Harvard he taught at the University of Virginia, Rutgers University, Columbia University, and Princeton University.
      At Columbia and Princeton he directed university programs in African American Studies and also, at Princeton, American Studies. Over the years he has won virtually all the major fellowships in the humanities, including those offered by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the American Council of Learned Societies. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. He has lectured on literature at the White House as well as at universities such as Harvard, Yale, the University of California, the University of Pennsylvania, Duke, Penn State, and Texas A&M. In March 2011, at the White House, he was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Obama.

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TILTS Poets & Scholars Co-directors


MetaMeta DuEwa Jones is the author of The Muse is Music: Jazz Poetry from the Harlem Renaissance to the Spoken Word (Illinois, 2011). Her articles, interviews, and poetry have also been published in African American Review, Souls, Callaloo, The Writer’s Chronicle, The Ringing Ear, and Rattle. She is an Associate Professor of English and African and African-American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin and Affiliate Faculty in African and African Diaspora Studies and American Studies.

 

 




LisaLisa L. Moore is Associate Professor of English and Women's and Gender Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the author of Dangerous Intimacies: Toward a Sapphic History of the British Novel (Duke, 1997) and Sister Arts: The Erotics of Lesbian Landscapes (Minnesota, 2011). She is the co-editor of Experiments in a Jazz Aesthetic: Art, Activism, Academia and the Austin Project (Texas, 2010) and Transatlantic Feminisms in the Age of Revolutions (Oxford, 2012). Her poems have appeared in anthologies and journals including Sinister Wisdom and Broadsided.

 

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Summer Poets & Scholars


Gloria Amescua
is an inaugural member of CantoMundo, a national Latina/o poetry community. She resides in Austin, Texas and received a master's degree from the University of Texas at Austin. Gloria has had poetry published in Poetgraphy, Di-Verse-City-Too, Tres-Di-Verse-City, Awakening, IXHUADi-Verse-City 2011, Kweli Journal and two poems in Generations Literary Journal Spring 2012. A poem will be forthcoming in the Texas Poetry Calendar 2013. In addition, Gloria is a workshop presenter for youth and adults, including the 2011 Flor de Nopal Festival in Austin and the 2012 Tejas Foco Regional Conference of The National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies (NACCS) at Texas State University. She was also a 2011 resident at Hedgebrook's Writers in Residence program on Whidby Island, Washington.


Chad Bennett is Presidential Excellence Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin. His essays have appeared in ELHModern Drama, and Cinema Journal, and his poems have appeared in journals including Denver Quarterlyjubilat, and Verse Daily. He is currently at work on a book-length study of gossip and twentieth-century American poetry.


Justin Bigos is a PhD candidate in English and Creative Writing at the University of North Texas, where he serves as Interviews Editor for the American Literary Review. His poems have appeared most recently in iO, Slice, The Collagist, Ploughshares, and The Gettysburg Review. He received his MFA from Warren Wilson College, where he met his wife, fiction writer Erin Stalcup.


Julia Penn Delacroix holds an MFA in poetry from Johns Hopkins.  She is currently a PhD candidate in the English Department at the University of Texas at Austin, where she is working on a dissertation about early American women's elegy.


Nandini Dhar is a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at University of Texas at Austin. Her poems have appeared in The Moment of Change: An Anthology of Feminist Speculative Poetry and are forthcoming in PANKPear Noir!, and Southern Humanities Review.


Meta DuEwa Jones is the author of The Muse is Music: Jazz Poetry from the Harlem Renaissance to the Spoken Word (Illinois, 2011). Her articles, interviews, and poetry have also been published in African American ReviewSoulsCallalooThe Writer’s ChronicleThe Ringing Ear, and Rattle. She is an Associate Professor of English and African and African-American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin and Affiliate Faculty in African and African Diaspora Studies and American Studies.


Paul M. Farber is a PhD candidate in American Culture at the University of Michigan and was the Doctoral Fellow in the History of African Americans and Germans/Germany at the German Historical Institute in Washington, DC.  His dissertation is a study of representations of the Berlin Wall in American literature and popular culture from 1961–present. He also recently co-edited a special issue of the journal Criticism on HBO's series, The Wire.


Susannah Hollister is American Council of Learned Societies New Faculty Fellow in the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin. She co-edited Gertrude Stein’s Stanzas in Meditation: The Corrected Edition (Yale, 2012) and is at work on a book project about geographic scale in postwar American poetry. Her work on that topic has appeared in Contemporary Literature and is forthcoming in Twentieth-Century Literature.


Sequoia Maner is a graduate student in English at the University of Texas at Austin. She completed her BA at Duke University in 2008. Her research interests include poetry, pop culture, and narratives of kinship ties and community within the African diaspora.


Lisa L. Moore is the 2011-12 co-director of the Texas Institute for Literary and Textual Studies. A professor of English and Women’s and Gender Studies, her most recent book, Sister Arts: The Erotics of Lesbian Landscapes (Minnesota, 2011), is a study of women's garden designs, botanical illustrations, and landscape poems. Her own poems have appeared in Experiments in a Jazz Aesthetic, Sinister Wisdom, Broadsided, and Lavender Review. Her poem "Anthropomorphic Harp" was awarded the Art/Lines Juried Competition for Ekphrastic Poetry.


Deborah Paredez is the author of the poetry collection, This Side of Skin (Wings Press, 2002), and the award-winning critical study, Selenidad: Selena, Latinos, and the Performance of Memory (Duke, 2009). Her poetry has appeared recently in Callaloo, Crab Orchard Review, Poet Lore, and Mandorla: New Writings from the Americas. She is a recipient of an Alfredo Cisneros del Moral Foundation Award, an American Association of University Women Postdoctoral Fellowship, and residencies from Hedgebrook and the Vermont Studio Center. She is the co-founder of CantoMundo, a national organization dedicated to Latina/o poets and poetry, and an Associate Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin.


Tina Posner is a freelance writer who currently lives in Austin, Texas. Before that she lived in Brooklyn, NY. Her poems have appeared in Long Shot, Intent, Stained Sheets, Defenestration, L.E.S Review, and Haggard & Halloo. She briefly taught creative writing to children at the Melrose Houses in the Bronx. She works in educational publishing, developing classroom products and writing materials for the same.


Matt Richardson


Laura Trantham Smith is a poet and teacher whose work has been produced by the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, the Painted Bride Art Center, and the Adrienne Theater in Philadelphia. She studied poetry at Naropa University and completed her Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin. She has served as a Poet in the Schools in Philadelphia, PA and Austin, TX and has led gender and sexuality writing workshops at the International Drag King Extravaganza, the Queer Texas Conference, and OutYouth. Recent articles have appeared in Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S. and Reflections: Writing, Service-Learning, and Community Literacy. She teaches poetry, African American literature, and creative writing at Stevenson University in Maryland.  


Cindy St. John is the author of several chapbooks, most recently, Be the Heat (Slash Pine Press). Her poems have appeared various places, including Peaches & BatsNo Tell Motel, and H_NGM_N.  She lives in Austin, TX, where she prints Headlamp, letterpress postcards of poetry and art.

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Spring Poets & Scholars

CHADChad Bennett is Presidential Excellence Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin. His essays have appeared in ELH, Modern Drama, and Cinema Journal, and his poems have appeared in journals including Denver Quarterly, jubilat, and Verse Daily. He is currently at work on a book-length study of gossip and twentieth-century American poetry. Read a poem.

 


 

 

Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia Earhart (Persea, 2005) and Apocalyptic Swing (Persea, 2009), which was a finalist for The Los Angeles Times Book Award. She is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including a Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lectureship from Stanford University, a Rona Jaffe Woman Writer's Award and a fellowship to Civitella di Ranieri in Umbria. She was recently awarded a prestigious Writing Residency Fellowship from the Lannan Foundation in Marfa. Her poems have been featured in the Washington Post and on Garrison Keillor's Poet's Almanac and in numerous journals. She lives in Los Angeles where she is the Poetry Editor for The Los Angeles Review of Books. Read a poem.

 

CYRUSCyrus Cassells’s fifth and latest book of poetry The Crossed-Out Swastika, is due from Copper Canyon Press in April 2012. Still Life with Children, translations from the Catalan of the poet Francesc Parcerisas, is forthcoming from Tupelo Press. Among his honors are a Lannan Literary Award, a Pushcart Prize, and two grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. He is a tenured Professor of English at Texas-State University and has taught on the faculty of Cave Canem, the esteemed African American Poets workshop. He lives in Paris and Austin. Read a poem.

 


ALEXISAlexis Pauline Gumbs was named one of UTNE Reader's 50 visionaries transforming the world in 2009. She is the founder of the Eternal Summer of the Black Feminist Mind Multimedia Community School and the co-creator of the Mobile Homecoming Project, a national experiential archive amplifying generations of LGBTQ Black Brilliance. Alexis has published essays and poetry in many journals including Signs, Obsidian, Gender Forum, American Book Review, Symbiosis, Macomere, Sinister Wisdom and Feminist Collections and many collections including Routledge Companion to Anglophone Caribbean Literature, The Black Imagination: Science Fiction, Futurism and the Speculative, Our Stories Ourselves: The Embodyment of Women's Literacy, Mothering and Hip Hop, the Encyclopedia of LGBTQ Literature. Her poetry has been featured most recently in the anthologies Does Your Mama Know?, Growing Up Girl, Leaving Home Becoming Home and Encounters. Her community accountable intellectual work and institution building has been covered on NPR, PBS, Curve, Huffington Post, and the International Museum of Women. Alexis earned her PhD in English, African and African American Studies and Women's Studies from Duke University in 2010. Read a poem.

 

FADYFady Joudah's The Earth in the Attic won the Yale Series for Younger Poets in 2007. His second collection, Alight, is forthcoming from Copper Canyon Press in 2013. His translations of Arabic poetry, especially the Palestinian Mahmoud Darwish's poetry, have earned him a TLS prize and a PEN award in translation. In spring 2012 he has a new translation of Ghassan Zaqtan's poetry due from Yale Press. Fady Joudah is a physician living and working in Houston, TX. He was a field member of Doctors Without Borders in 2002 and 2005. Read a poem.

 

 

 

LYNNLynn Keller is the author of Re-Making It New: Contemporary American Poetry and the Modernist Tradition (Cambridge, 1987), Forms of Expansion: Recent Long Poems by Women (Chicago, 1997), and Thinking Poetry: Readings in Contemporary Women’s Exploratory Poetics (Iowa, 2010). With Cristanne Miller she edited Feminist Measures: Soundings in Poetry and Theory (Michigan, 1994). She is poetry editor for the journal Contemporary Literature and co-editor with Dee Morris and Alan Golding of the University of Iowa Press Contemporary North American Poetry Series. She teaches in the English Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she is the Martha Meier Renk Bascom Professor of Poetry. Her current project is an ecocritical study of recent experimental North American poetry.

 

VALERIEValerie Martínez is a poet, translator, teacher, playwright, librettist, and collaborative artist. Her award-winning books include Absence, Luminescent (Four Way Books, 1999), World to World (Arizona, 2004), A Flock of Scarlet Doves (Sutton Hoo Press, 2005), Each and Her (Arizona, 2010), And They Called It Horizon (Sunstone, 2010) and This is How It Began (Palace Press, 2010). Her most recent book, Each and Her (winner of the 2012 Arizona Book Award), was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN Open Book Award, the William Carlos William Award, and the National Book Award. Her work has been widely published in journals, magazines, anthologies and media outlets including The Best American Poetry, the Washington Post, and the Poetry Foundation’s Poetry Everywhere series. Valerie has more than twenty years of experience as a teacher, primarily at the college level. For over ten years, she has also worked with children, young adults, adults, teachers, and seniors in a wide range of community outreach and educational programs. She is Executive Director of Littleglobe, Inc., an artist-run non-profit that collaborates with communities on art and community dialogue projects. Valerie has a B.A. from Vassar College and an MFA from the University of Arizona.  She was the Poet Laureate of Santa Fe, New Mexico for 2008-2010. Learn more about Valerie at www.valeriemartinez.net. Read a poem.

 

Eileen Myles Read a poem.

 

URAYOANUrayoán Noel is Assistant Professor of English at the University at Albany, SUNY, and a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Puerto Rican Studies, where he is completing a book on Nuyorican poetry and its performance from the 1960s to the present. His creative works include the books of poetry Hi-Density Politics (BlazeVox, 2010), Boringkén (Ediciones Callejon/La Tertulia, 2008), and Kool Logic/La lógica kool (Bilingual Press, 2005) and the DVD Kool Logic Sessions (2005). His critical essays have appeared (or will appear) in Latino Studies, Contemporary Literature, Centro: Journal of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies, and in the edited volume Diasporic Avant-Gardes: Experimental Poetics and Cultural Displacement (Palgrave, 2009). He is a contributing editor of Mandorla and a recipient of a 2011-2012 BRIO Poetry Fellowship from the Bronx Council on the Arts. Read a poem.

 

Laura Trantham Smith is a poet and teacher whose work has been produced by the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, the Painted Bride Art Center, and the Adrienne Theater in Philadelphia. She studied poetry at Naropa University and completed her Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin. She has served as a Poet in the Schools in Philadelphia, PA and Austin, TX and has led gender and sexuality writing workshops at the International Drag King Extravaganza, the Queer Texas Conference, and OutYouth. Recent articles have appeared in Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S and Reflections: Writing, Service-Learning, and Community Literacy. She teaches poetry, African American literature, and creative writing at Stevenson University in Maryland. 
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Fall Poets & Scholars

 

GerShunGerShun Avilez is an Assistant Professor of English and African American Studies at Yale University. He writes and teaches courses on African-American literature, visual art, and cultural criticism, especially of the 20th and 21st centuries. His current book project is a study of the artistic and critical legacies of the Black Arts Movement. His published work appears in African American Review, Callaloo, and the recent critical collection Representing Segregation (SUNY Press, 2010).






ChanelChanel Clarke is currently pursuing her MFA in poetry at the Michener Center for Writers in the University of Texas at Austin. Her poems have appeared in Sou'wester, Octopus, Side B Magazine and GLR. She was born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana. Read a poem.


 

 

 

 


AldonAldon Lynn Nielsen is the George and Barbara Kelly Professor of American Literature at the Pennsylvania State University. His books of criticism include Integral Music (Alabama, 2004), Black Chant (Cambridge, 1997), C.L.R. James: A Critical Introduction (Mississippi, 1997), Writing between the Lines (Georgia, 1994) and Reading Race (Georgia, 1990). He has published six collections of poetry: Mantic Semantic (Hanks Original Loose Gravel Press, 2011), Mixage (Zasterle, 2005), VEXT (Sink Press, 1999), Stepping Razor (Edge Books, 1997), Evacuation Routes (Score, 1994) and Heat Strings (SOS, 1985). Among the awards he has received are the SAMLA Studies Prize, the Josephine Miles Award, the Kayden Prize, the American Book Award and the Gertrude Stein Award. Nielsen studied at the Federal City College and the George Washington University before teaching at Howard University, San Jose State University, UCLA, Loyola Marymount University and Penn State. With Lauri Ramey he is the editor of Every Goodbye Ain't Gone: An Anthology of Innovative Poetry by African Americans (Alabama, 2006) and What I Say: Innovative Poetry by Black Writers in America, forthcoming from the University of Alabama Press. Read a poem.



LeonardKeith Leonard is the author of Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from Slavery to Civil Rights (Virginia, 2006). He did his master's in English at UNC Chapel and his PhD at Stanford. His publications,presentations, and courses have revolved around the study of political consciousness in African American poetry and poetics, with an emphasis on the relationship between literary form and political meaning. In addition to essays on the work Yusef Komunyakaa, African American women’s poetry and jazz in African American literature, Prof. Leonard has served as guest editor for special issues of the journals Callaloo and MELUS. Prof. Leonard is currently working on a book project that explores how contemporary African American artists, especially poets, represent the role of love, intimacy and willed affiliation in imagining notions of community that serve as antidotes to postmodern skepticism.

 

DawnDawn Lundy Martin is the author of DISCIPLINE (Nightboat Books, 2011), which was selected by Fanny Howe for the Nightboat Poetry Prize; A Gathering of Matter/A Matter of Gathering (University of Georgia, 2007), winner of the Cave Cavem Prize; and, The Morning Hour, selected in 2003 by C.D. Wright for the Poetry Society of America's National Chapbook Fellowship. Among her many honors include Massachusetts Cultural Council Artists Grants for Poetry in 2002 and 2006 and the 2008 Academy of American Arts and Sciences May Sarton Prize for Poetry. She is a founding member of the Black Took Collective, a group of experimental black poets; co-editor of a collection of essays, The Fire This Time: Young Activists And The New Feminism (Anchor Books, 2004); and a founder of the Third Wave Foundation in New York, a national young feminist organization. She is an assistant professor of English in the Writing Program at the University of Pittsburgh. Read a poem.



danteDante Micheaux is the author of Amorous Shepherd (Sheep Meadow Press, 2010). His poems and translations have appeared in The American Poetry Review, Bloom, Callaloo, Gathering Ground and Rattapallax—among other journals and anthologies. He has been a guest of the Poetry Project and the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine. His honors include a prize in poetry from the Vera List Center for Art & Politics, the Oscar Wilde Award and fellowships from Cave Canem Foundation and The New York Times Foundation. He resides in London and New York City. Read a poem.

 



Roger Roger Reeves' poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Poetry, Ploughshares, American Poetry Review, American Literary Review, Gulf Coast, and the Indiana Review, among others. Kim Addonizio selected “Kletic of Walt Whitman” for the Best New Poets 2009 anthology. He was awarded a Ruth Lilly Fellowship by the Poetry Foundation in 2008, two Bread Loaf Scholarships, an Alberta H. Walker Scholarship from the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, and two Cave Canem Fellowships. Recently, he earned his MFA from the James A. Michener Center for Creative Writing at the University of Texas. Currently, he is a Ph.D. student in the Department of English at the University of Texas and an assistant professor of poetry at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Read a poem.

 

 

EvieEvie Shockley is the author of four collections of poetry: the new black (Wesleyan, 2011), a half-red sea (Carolina Wren Press, 2006), and two chapbooks. Her study Renegade Poetics: Black Aesthetics and Formal Innovation in African American Poetry will be published by the University of Iowa Press in 2011. Her poems and essays have appeared widely in journals and anthologies; additionally, from 2007-2011 she co-edited the poetry journal jubilat. Shockley is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers University, in New Brunswick, New Jersey, where she teaches African American literature and creative writing. Read a poem.

 



lyraeLyrae Van Clief-Stefanon
is the author of Open Interval (Pittsburgh, 2009), a National Book Award finalist; and Black Swan (Pittsburgh, 2002), winner of the 2001 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. She is co-author, with Elizabeth Alexander, of the chapbook Poems in Conversation and a Conversation (Slapering Hol Press, 2008). She teaches in the English Department at Cornell University. Read a poem.






WheelerLesley Wheeler’s books include Voicing American Poetry: Sound and Performance from the 1920s to the Present (Cornell, 2008), shortlisted for the Modernist Studies Association Book prize, and the collection Heterotopia (2010), winner of the Barrow Street Press Poetry Prize. She has held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Fulbright Foundation; her current research concerns poetry and community in the twenty-first century. Wheeler is the Henry S. Fox, Jr. Professor of English at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. Read a poem.

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