College of Liberal Arts

Upcoming DIIA Faculty Development Opportunities

Fri, Feb 12, 2010

The Division of Instructional Innovation and Assessment presents faculty instructional development sessions for Spring 2010.

Best Practices of Great Teachers

Thursday, February 18, 2010; 1:00pm-2:15pm; MAI 26 
Register: https://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/dms/courseReg/main/?cn=204
Using examples of the best teachers from our past, participants will determine the characteristics of these teachers that made them so memorable. We will then compare the characteristics of participants’ best teachers with a research study of 63 professors in 40 different disciplines at 24 institutions. What are the similarities and differences? How can we look at our own teaching and incorporate more of the “outstanding teacher” distinctiveness?

Individual Differences

Monday, February 22, 2010; 10:30am-11:45am; MAI 26 
Register: https://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/dms/courseReg/main/?cn=209
Learning styles, multiple intelligences and cultural diversity all affect individual students’ ability to learn. With so many differences, what’s an instructor to do? This workshop will glean some key findings from research in these areas, and offer suggestions on modifying your teaching strategies to promote effective learning for all students.

Interactive Techniques for Teaching Large Classes

Tuesday, February 23, 2010; 10:30am-11:45am; MAI 26 
Register: https://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/dms/courseReg/main/?cn=117
Even the most enthusiastic instructor is challenged by the responsibility of teaching classes of 100 students or more. Keeping students attentive in large classes requires more than being the sage on the stage. We will analyze the dynamics of group learning to generate strategies and techniques for promoting community, participation, and learning in classes of any size.

Teaching for Critical Thinking

Wednesday, February 24, 2010; 1:00-3:00pm; MAI 26
Register: https://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/dms/courseReg/main/?cn=208
While the phrase "critical thinking" has been used to refer to many things, this session provides specific and practical activities organized by Halpern's four-part framework for teaching critical thinking skills in the college classroom. This interactive session explores how to: (1) help students develop a critical thinking attitude, (2) teach specific critical thinking skills, (3) help students transfer critical thinking skills into new contexts, and (4) cultivate in students habits of reflection and metacognition.

Team-Based Learning for Classroom Success

Monday, March 1, 2010; 10:30am-11:45am; MAI 26 
Register: https://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/dms/courseReg/main/?cn=165
In this session, participants will experience and explore the features of Team-Based Learning (TBL), an increasingly popular form of college-level collaborative learning. TBL's sequence of individual and teamwork with immediate feedback, transforms student groups into cohesive and high-performing learning teams, where students increasingly hold each other accountable for coming to class prepared and inquisitive.

Teaching 21st Century Learners

Wednesday, March 3, 2010; 1:00pm-2:15pm; MAI 26 
Register: https://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/dms/courseReg/main/?cn=71
Instructors often lament that today’s college students arrive less prepared than students of old. Does this mean that instructors should abandon their roles to technology or to the students themselves? Certainly not—however, it might imply that deliberate attempts to change teaching styles could benefit both students and instructors. This session will focus on building on the experiences and expectations that students bring to learning environments to successfully create opportunities for learning.

Using Student Feedback to Improve Instruction

Monday, March 8, 2010 10:30am-11:45am; MAI 26
Register: https://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/dms/courseReg/main/?cn=219
It is hard to imagine anyone on the teaching staff at UT Austin who has not at some time gazed with a puzzled frown at the results of a course instructor survey (CIS) from some class. We often look at the numbers and written comments with dismay and confusion. How can instructors help students understand that the CIS feedback is taken seriously? How can we encourage students to contribute written comments that are specific and constructive? We will look at these questions and more in this workshop.

Designing Effective Discussions

Tuesday, March 9, 2010; 10:30am-11:45am; MAI 26 
Register: https://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/dms/courseReg/main/?cn=112
Leading discussions requires considerable advance planning to identify content objectives, develop questions to promote critical thinking, and choose classroom management techniques to elicit high-quality student contributions. We will help you develop successful planning techniques, discuss ways to overcome discussion barriers, and find alternative discussion activities to promote learning.

Interactive Techniques for Teaching Large Classes

Wednesday, March 10, 2010; 1:00pm-2:15pm; MAI 26 
Register: https://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/dms/courseReg/main/?cn=117
Even the most enthusiastic instructor is challenged by the responsibility of teaching classes of 100 students or more. Keeping students attentive in large classes requires more than being the sage on the stage. We will analyze the dynamics of group learning to generate strategies and techniques for promoting community, participation, and learning in classes of any size.

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