Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

Gregory W. Knapp


Associate ProfessorPh.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison

Associate Professor, Department of Geography and the Environment
Gregory W. Knapp

Contact

  • Phone: 512.232.1588
  • Office: CLA 3.712
  • Office Hours: Wednesday 12-1

Interests


Adaptive dynamics of agriculture and cultural landscapes, regional identities and mapping, modernization in the context of historical cultural ecology, history of thought, Andes

Biography


Gregory Knapp received his BA from the University of California, Berkeley, in Mathematics and Economics with Distinction in General Scholarship, and his PhD in Geography (minor in Anthropology) from the University of Wisconsin. He taught at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities before joining the University of Texas faculty in 1984.

Knapp’s research has focused on adaptive dynamics of prehistoric and traditional agriculture in Peru and Ecuador, including embanked fields, sunken fields, raised fields, irrigation, and slope agriculture. The adaptive dynamics approach emphasizes local decision making, while also recognizing the salience of particular environmental, cultural, social, economic, and political contexts as they change over time. The approach is also consistent with attention to the cultural landscape in the tradition of Carl Sauer and Yi-Fu Tuan. In addition to working on reconstructing prehistoric landscapes and demography, Knapp was involved in the first major international study of the impacts of climate change on Andean agriculture, where he argued for policies maximizing local adaptive flexibility. Supervised student research has included the persistence of smallholder farming (with Katia Raquel Avilés-Vázquez) and discourses on water management practices (with Cyrus Reed and Patricia Mothes). Knapp’s recent research on this theme focuses on agricultural modernization in the Andes, especially floriculture.

A second major research theme has been the critical study of regional identities, ethnogeography, ethnic territoriality and mapping. Knapp was involved in organizing conferences on the ethnic geography of Latin America and a series of international conferences on regional identities in Texas and Mexico in the 1980s. He published one of the first studies of the ethnogeography of Ecuador and co-edited a pioneering special issue of a refereed journal devoted to the topic of participatory mapping. Supervised doctoral student research on this theme has included the importance of food and foodways and female empowerment in creating distinctive Kitchenspace (with Maria Elisa Christie) and ethnohistory and territoriality in Nicaragua (with Karl Offen). Knapp’s current research concerns language persistence and salience for identity.

A third theme has been the contextualization of modernization (both neoliberalism and social democracy) in historical cultural ecology, as the latest phase of humanity’s progressive achievement of greater efficiencies through collaboration, and in feminist political ecology and post-development theory. Modernization has both advantages and disadvantages, as recently addressed in discourses about sustainability. Supervised student research on this theme includes the role of NGOs in creating distinctive landscapes (with Juanita Sundberg and Tom Perreault), and the empowerment of indigenous communities and women in the face of larger scale modernization processes (with Mary Brook, David Salisbury, Gregory Schwartz and Maria Belén Noroña Salcedo).

A fourth theme has been the history of geographic thought, both in terms of institutions and in terms of regions. Knapp is an editor for the Library of Congress relating to bibliographies of Western South America, and has also authored departmental and biographical histories in the discipline of geography.

Knapp has received three separate Fulbright Fellowships, as well as other grants. He has been elected to national offices in the Association of American Geographers and Conference of Latin American Geographers; the latter honored him with its Outstanding Service Award. He was elected President of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Alpha chapter at the University of Texas.

Knapp’s local service includes five years organizing transnational conferences on cultural, environmental and historical commonalities between northeastern Mexico and Texas. He served for two consecutive four year terms as Department Chair, crafting the Urban Studies major, initiating UT’s partnership with the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, changing the department’s name to “Geography and the Environment,” and co-sponsoring the creation of the Institute of Environmental Science. After his chairmanship he served for five years as Chair of the Graduate Studies Committee and Graduate Advisor. Most recently, as co-chair of the BA in Sustainability Studies committee, he has been active in helping bring this new major to fruition in the next undergraduate catalog.

Knapp’s current teaching at the undergraduate level includes a Large Format Signature Course in Latin American Environmental History and Sustainability (recipient of a competitive Course Conversion Award), a large course in Geography of Latin America which meets one of the University’s core requirements, an upper division course on Nature, Society and Adaptation, and a faculty-led study abroad course on Nature, Society and Sustainability which has been conducted in Argentina and (currently) Ecuador. His courses are cross listed with Latin American Studies or Anthropology, and bear flags in Global Cultures, Writing, and/or Ethics and Leadership. Knapp welcomes honor’s thesis students working on issues related to his research themes.

Knapp’s graduate level teaching includes a seminar, Latin America: Culture, Environment and Development which is open to all students by instructor permission. He has supervised 38 doctoral dissertations and master’s theses; former students include tenured faculty at the University of British Columbia, Oberlin, University of Richmond, and Syracuse, as well as employees of government, non-governmental organizations, education, and business. He continues to welcome applications from prospective advisees who are interested in critical and innovative field work in Latin America.

Selected Publications by Research Theme

Adaptive Dynamics

1988 (co authored) The Effects of Climatic Variation on Agriculture in the Central Sierra of Ecuador, in The Impact of Climatic Variations on Agriculture. Volume 2: Assessments in Semi-Arid Regions., M. L. Parry, T. R. Carter and N. R. Konijn, eds., pp. 383-493. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

1988 (co-edited with N. Allan and C. Stadel), Human Impact on Mountains. Totowa, New Jersey: Rowman and Littlefield.

1991 Andean Ecology: Adaptive Dynamics in Ecuador. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press.

1999. (with P. Mothes) Quilotoa Ash and Human Settlements in the Equatorial Andes, pp. 139-155 in Actividad Volcánica y Pueblos Precolombinos en el Ecuador, Patricia Mothes, Coordinator. Quito: Ediciones Abya Yala.

2007. The Legacy of European Colonialism, in The Physical Geography of South America, edited by T. Veblen, K. Young, and A. Orme, pp 279-288, Oxford University Press.

In press. Mapping Flowers in the Equatorial High Andes, Journal of Latin American Geography 14(3).

Ethnogeography and Regional Geography

1995 (with C. Caviedes) South America. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.

1987 Geografia Quichua de la Sierra del Ecuador. Quito: Ediciones Abya Yala. (First Edition; third edition 1991)

2003 (with Peter Herlihy, guest eds.) Participatory Mapping of Indigenous Lands in Latin America, special issue of Human Organization. Volume 62, number 4.

Modernization

2002 (editor) Latin America in the Twenty-First Century: Challenges and Solutions. Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers and University of Texas Press.

2010. The Andes: Personal Reflections on Cultural Change, 1977-2010, Journal of Cultural Geography 27:307-316.

In press. Human Ecology, in The Wiley-AAG International Encyclopedia of Geography: People, the Earth, Environment, and Technology.

History of Thought

1998. Geography at the University of Texas at Austin: A Departmental History, The Southwestern Geographer 2: 95-123.

2005 (with W. Doolittle). Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov, 1938-2003, Annals of the Association of American Geographers 95(2): 462-470.

2014. Geography: Western South America, in Handbook of Latin American Studies: No. 69: Social Sciences, edited by Tracy North and Katherine D. McCann, University of Texas Press.

Courses


LAS 388 • Lat Amer Culs, Envir, & Dev

39695 • Fall 2015
Meets M 700pm-1000pm CLA 2.606
(also listed as GRG 395D)

Course Description:

THIS COURSE IS RESTRICTED; YOU MUST OBTAIN INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION TO REGISTER.

This seminar is designed to help Latin Americanist students perform academic research on human-environment relationships, as well as to work for and to critique development agencies, businesses and non-governmental organizations. The class explores the ideas and methods of a number of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields including cultural and political ecology, ecological anthropology, environmental history, development studies, sustainability studies, and cultural geography. The course will address a range of issues of sustainable development, cultural and political ecology, cultural identity and territory, gender, the smallholder/ householder focus of production, adaptive tactics and strategies, food and farming, environmental impacts of traditional land use, conservation strategies, and the changing impacts of markets and the state on local economies and land use. Topics and readings are developed in part on the basis of input from students.

Prerequisites: 

Graduate standing and some knowledge of rural Latin America or the Caribbean. Knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is desirable but not necessary. THIS COURSE IS RESTRICTED; YOU MUST OBTAIN INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION TO REGISTER. To obtain permission, email the instructor with a brief description of your research area and Latin American academic and field experience.

Course Characteristics: 

 Each class will consist of (1) short lecture(s) by the instructor; (2) proctored discussions of the week's readings, co-chaired by two students who have, in consultation with the instructor, prepared a strategy for addressing the readings and student essays (which may include splitting into smaller groups); and (3) a food break providing for more informal discussion of the topics.

LAS 319 • Geography Of Latin America

39585 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.128
(also listed as GRG 319)

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, ecology, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, the insertion of Latin America in the global economy, population, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival. The class can serve as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching.

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management, and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the Area B requirement for the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences. This course may not be used towards the Area C requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). All students are required to take the final exam.

Grading Policy

Exams test knowledge of locations (with map questions), concepts, explanations, and solutions. The tests contain objective, map, and short-answer essay type questions. The student is responsible for all the material in the readings, assigned web pages, and lectures, including maps and other graphics, but the lectures are most important. Quizzes are handed out at the beginning of several lectures.

Quizzes & Attendance (15%) Three Exams (60%) Project (details to be announced in class) (25%).

LAS 330 • S Amer: Nat/Socty/Sust-Ecu

39655 • Spring 2015
Meets
(also listed as GRG 323K)

Restricted to students in the Maymester Abroad Program; contact the Stud y Abroad Office for permission to register for this class. Class meets J une 3-July 3. Taught in various locations in Ecuador, including Cuenca, Ecuador. Students must consult with Study Abroad Program Coordinator as travel and orientation dates may be in addition to these dates.

LAS 388 • Lat Amer Culs, Envir, & Dev

40790 • Fall 2014
Meets M 700pm-1000pm CLA 2.606
(also listed as GRG 395D)

This seminar is designed to help Latin Americanist students perform academic research on human-environment relationships, as well as to work for and to critique development agencies, businesses and non-governmental organizations. The class explores the ideas and methods of a number of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields including cultural and political ecology, ecological anthropology, environmental history, development studies, sustainability studies, and cultural geography. The course will address a range of issues of sustainable development, cultural and political ecology, cultural identity and territory, gender, the smallholder/ householder focus of production, adaptive tactics and strategies, food and farming, environmental impacts of traditional land use, conservation strategies, and the changing impacts of markets and the state on local economies and land use. Topics and readings are developed in part on the basis of input from students.

Each class will consist of (1) short lecture(s) by the instructor; (2) proctored discussions of the week's readings, co-chaired by two students who have, in consultation with the instructor, prepared a strategy for addressing the readings and student essays (which may include splitting into smaller groups); and (3) a food break providing for more informal discussion of the topics.

Course readings and other materials will be posted on Canvas. Readings vary widely across topics and disciplines and include, for example, Arturo Escobar, Maria Elisa Christie, Anthony Bebbington, Juanita Sundberg, Karl Zimmerer, Eric Wolf, Maria Belen Norona Salcedo, Thomas Sowell, Charles Hale, Paul Robbins, Diane Rocheleau, Kendra McSweeney, James Scott, Diana Liverman, and Eduardo Gudynas, among many others.

Prerequisites: 

Ideally, direct experience of rural Latin America. Knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is desirable but not necessary. THIS COURSE IS RESTRICTED; YOU MUST OBTAIN INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION TO REGISTER. To obtain permission, email the instructor with a brief description of your research area and Latin American academic and field experience.

LAS F330 • Geography Of So America-Arg

85500 • Summer 2014
Meets
(also listed as GRG F323K)

This course examines issues of cultural landscapes, society, and sustainable development in South America. For summer 2014, the course takes full advantage of its location in Buenos Aires, Argentina.  Buenos Aires is South America's second largest city, with about 13 million people in the metropolitan area; it is located at the edge of the subtropical, agricultural Pampa.  Buenos Aires has attracted a large number of immigrants from all over the country and a substantial number from the rest of South America, Europe, and Asia. Students will examine selected issues of the geography of this urban landscape through readings, discussions, and field trips.

 

LAS 319 • Geography Of Latin America

40810 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.128
(also listed as GRG 319)

This course is a general introduction to the environmental, cultural, economic and political geography of Latin America and the Caribbean. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can also benefit from the exploration of such topics as environmental hazards, indigenous lifeways and resource management, globalization and modernization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival.  

The course examines major environmental zones as defined by geomorphology, climate, and biogeography, in terms of risks and hazards, resources, and human impacts. Students also study social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods, social structures, and cultures, including early migrants to the Americas, the rise of chiefdoms and indigenous civilizations including Aztec and Inca, the European conquest and spread of Iberian colonial culture and economic relationships, and the inception and spread of modernization as related to neoliberal and alternative forms of development including discourses of sustainability in contemporary Latin America. Relationships between regional, national, and global communities are studied by means of a commodity chain project resulting in a written paper.  A range of environmental and social science theories and methods are discussed, including plate tectonics, basic climate models, hazards research, circumscription theory, and theories of modernization, dependency, and development. Communication skills are developed through graphical and essay questions on quizzes and exams, the written course project, and discussion in lectures and optional discussion sections.

The class serves as a preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for teaching. This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies, and for a Latin American concentration in International Relations and Global Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management (Sustainability), and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the University's Core Requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences. The course has a Global Cultures flag. This is also a Bridging Disciplines course (for the Global Studies, Environment, and/or the Social Entrepreneurship & Non-profits BDPs). 

 

LAS 388 • Lat Amer Culs, Envir, & Dev

41010 • Fall 2013
Meets M 700pm-1000pm CLA 2.606
(also listed as GRG 395D)

This seminar is designed to help Latin Americanist students perform academic research on human-environment relationships, as well as to work for and to critique development agencies, businesses and non-governmental organizations. The class explores the ideas and methods of a number of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields including cultural and political ecology, ecological anthropology, environmental history, development studies, and cultural geography. The course will address a range of issues of sustainable development, cultural and political ecology, cultural identity and territory, gender, the smallholder/ householder focus of production, adaptive tactics and strategies, food and farming, environmental impacts of traditional land use, conservation strategies, and the changing impacts of markets and the state on local economies and land use. Topics and readings are developed in part on the basis of input from students.

Prerequisites:

Graduate standing and some knowledge of rural Latin America or the Caribbean. Knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is desirable but not necessary. THIS COURSE IS RESTRICTED; YOU MUST OBTAIN INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION TO REGISTER. To obtain permission, email the instructor with a brief description of your research area and Latin American academic and field experience.

LAS 319 • Geography Of Latin America

40320 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 0.128
(also listed as GRG 319)

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, climate, plants and animals, environmental hazards, indigenous lifeways and resource management, globalization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival. The class serves as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for teaching. This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies, and for a Latin American concentration in International Relations and Global Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management (Sustainability), and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the University's Core Requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences. The course has a Global Cultures flag. This is also a Bridging Disciplines course (for the Global Studies, Environment, and/or the Social Entrepreneurship & Non-profits BDPs).

LAS 388 • Lat Amer Culs, Envir, & Dev

40475 • Fall 2012
Meets M 700pm-1000pm GRG 408
(also listed as GRG 395D)

This seminar is designed to help Latin Americanist students perform academic research on human-environment relationships, as well as to work for and to critique development agencies, businesses and non-governmental organizations. The class explores the ideas and methods of a number of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields including cultural and political ecology, ecological anthropology, environmental history, development studies, and cultural geography. The course will address issues of sustainable development, cultural and political ecology, cultural identity and territory, gender, the smallholder/ householder focus of production, adaptive tactics and strategies, food and farming, environmental impacts of traditional land use, conservation strategies, and the changing impacts of markets and the state on local economies and land use. These topics will be developed using examples from Latin America. 

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and some knowledge of rural Latin America or the Caribbean. Knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is desirable but not necessary. THIS COURSE IS RESTRICTED; YOU MUST OBTAIN INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION TO REGISTER.

LAS F330 • Geography Of So America-Arg

86020 • Summer 2012
Meets
(also listed as GRG F323K)

This course examines issues of culture, environment, and sustainable development in South America. An understanding of the dynamics of changing indigenous, colonial, and modern landscapes provides context for debating appropriate development and conservation pathways.  For summer 2012, the course takes full advantage of its location in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as part of the University of Texas's Buenos Aires Study Abroad Program.  Buenos Aires is South America's second largest city, with about 13 million people in the metropolitan area; it is located at the edge of the subtropical, agricultural Pampa.  Buenos Aires has attracted a large number of immigrants from all over the country and a substantial number from the rest of South America, Europe, and Asia. Students will examine selected issues through readings, discussions, and field trips.

Admission to this course is restricted to students admitted to the Buenos Aires Study Abroad Program. (Applications are no longer being accepted).

LAS 319 • Geography Of Latin America

40170 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GRG 102
(also listed as GRG 319)

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, climate, plants and animals, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, globalization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival.  The class serves as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching. 

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies, and for a Latin American concentration in International Relations and Global Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management, and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the University's Core Requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences. This course may not be used towards the Science & Technology requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). The course has a Global Cultures flag. This is also a Bridging Disciplines course (for either the International Studies or Environment BDP). 

Prerequisites:  This course should not be taken by anyone who has completed UGS 303: Latin America Environmental History and Sustainability. Otherwise the course is open to all students.

LAS 388 • Lat Amer Culs, Envir, & Dev

40410 • Fall 2011
Meets M 700pm-1000pm GRG 408
(also listed as GRG 395D)

This seminar is designed to help Latin Americanist students perform academic research on human-environment relationships, as well as to work for and to critique development agencies, businesses and non-governmental organizations. The class explores the ideas and methods of a number of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields including cultural and political ecology, ecological anthropology, environmental history, development studies, and cultural geography. The course will address issues of sustainable development, cultural identity and territory, gender, the smallholder/ householder focus of production, adaptive tactics and strategies, food and farming, environmental impacts of traditional land use, traditional conservation strategies, cultural survival, population growth, environmental change, and the changing impacts of markets and the state on local economies and land use. These topics will be developed using examples from Latin America. 

LAS S319 • Geography Of Latin America

86120 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm GRG 102
(also listed as GRG S319)

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. An effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, climate, plants and animals, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, globalization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival.  The class serves as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching. 

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies, and for a Latin American concentration in International Relations and Global Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management, and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the University's Core Requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences.  It may be used to meet the Foreign Language / Culture requirement for a Bachelor of Science degree (for example, in the College of Natural Sciences). This course may not be used towards the Science & Technology requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). The course has a Global Cultures flag. This is also a Bridging Disciplines course (for either the International Studies or Environment BDP). 

Prerequisites:  This course should not be taken by anyone who has completed UGS 303: Latin America Environmental History and Sustainability. Otherwise the course is open to all students.

LAS 319 • Geography Of Latin America

40495 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GRG 102
(also listed as GRG 319)

Adaptations to population growth and spatial integration in cultural landscapes of great natural and ethnic diversity; problems of frontiers and cities.

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, climate, plants and animals, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, globalization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival.  The class serves as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching; it also can serve as a resource for a more advanced career in research.

LAS 319 • Geography Of Latin America

85420 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm BUR 220
(also listed as GRG 319)

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, climate, plants and animals, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, globalization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival.  The class serves as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching; it also can serve as a resource for a more advanced career in research.

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies. The course can be used to meet the Area B requirement for the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences. This course may not be used towards the Area C requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). This is also a Connexus course (Environmental BDP, and others). 

Textbooks:

•Robert B. Kent, Latin America: Regions and Peoples (Guilford 2006)

•Gregory Knapp, ed.  Latin America in the Twenty First Century: Challenges and Solutions (UT Press, 2002). 

 Recommended (not required): Charles C. Mann, 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus

Website:

You can access Blackboard for this course on the following site:  https://courses.utexas.edu/

In addition, other web sites and materials will be assigned during class.  The Blackboard web syllabus and schedule is the official syllabus for this course.  Course lecture Power Points will usually be placed on line within 24 hours after each lecture, but these are no substitute for lecture notes.

Summary of Grading:

Exams and quizzes test knowledge of locations (with map questions), concepts, explanations, and solutions. The tests contain objective, map, and essay type questions. The student is responsible for all the material in the readings, assigned web pages, and lectures, including maps and other graphics, but the lectures are most important.  

* Quizzes and attendance (15%).  

* Two Midterms (40%), June 16 and June 28.

* Project (15%).  Details will be on Blackboard.  Due July 5.

* Final Exam (30%).  July 10 (2-5 pm).   

Grading is based on total points (90-100 A, 80-89.5 B, etc) and is not "curved."  Grades in this course are not on the plus or minus system.

Although the course is designed to be accessible to everyone, this is not an easy course, and some students do earn F's and D's every semester.  If you are on probation, or are trying to use this course to raise your GPA to graduate, qualify for a study abroad program, or for other reasons, this course might not meet your needs.

Classroom Policy on Electronic Devices and Behavior

Laptops are NOT allowed. Laptops, cell phones, MP3 players, and other such devices must be turned off and stowed during classes and exams.  Lectures may not be recorded in any way without prior permission.  Online materials may not be copied or distributed without prior permission. In exceptional cases, with prior permission, students will be allowed to take lecture notes on their laptops; in these cases, laptop lecture notes need to provided to the professor for each class, and students need to pledge not to use computers for any other purpose during class. The professor will not provide feedback on lecture notes.

Students will arrive on time, minimize unscheduled personal breaks, and stay until the class ends.  They will respect the views and opinions of their colleagues. Disagreement and debate are encouraged. Intolerance for the views of others is unacceptable.

Accommodations for Special Needs

The University makes reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities.  Any student who requires special accommodations must obtain a letter that documents the disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). Present the letter to the professor at the beginning of the semester so that needed accommodations can be discussed. The student should remind the professor of any testing accommodations no later than five business days before an exam. For more information, visit http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/. 



  • Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    SRH 1.310
    2300 Red River Street D0800
    Austin, Texas 78712