Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

Juliet Hooker


Associate ProfessorPh.D., Cornell University

Associate Professor, Department of Government and Department of African & African Diaspora Studies
Juliet Hooker

Contact

Interests


Race relations; multiculturalism; Latin American political thought; indigenous politics; Afro-descendant politics; Latinos in the U.S.

Courses


LAS 384L • Latin American Polit Thought

39674 • Fall 2015
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as GOV 382M)

GOV 382M                                                                   

Prof. Juliet Hooker

Fall 2015

 

1) Prerequisites: NONE

 

2) Course Description:

Latin American Political Thought

Latin American political thinkers, who have been tremendously influential in their own region, remain marginal to the canon of Western political thought. This course is an overview of the various traditions in the history of Latin American political thought. It examines the answers Latin American thinkers have given to some of the fundamental preoccupations of political theory from the perspective of the region’s social and political realities. The course will introduce students to some of the most influential figures in Latin American political thought—such as Bartolomé de las Casas, Simón Bolivar, Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Martí, José Vasconcelos, José Carlos Mariátegui, etc.—as well as to the work of contemporary Latino political theorists in the United States who are drawing on this tradition. It will use this engagement with the history of political thought in Latin America to ask the following questions: To what extent can we say that there is a tradition of Latin American political thought? If so, what are its contours? What are the main problematics that animate this tradition? To what extent does it reflect concerns specific to Latin America? To what extent does it challenge the conceptual and methodological boundaries of the canon of Western political thought?

 

3) Grading Policy:

Students will write two short (2-page, single spaced) critical response essays about the readings and one longer final paper (10-15 pages). Students will also make one in-class presentation based on a day’s readings. Final grades will be assessed based on two critical response essays (17% each for a total of 34%), the final essay (34%), in-class presentation (16%), and class participation (16%).

 

4) Texts:

1. Domingo F. Sarmiento, Facundo: Civilization and Barbarism (University of California Press, 2004).

2. José Vasconcelos, The Cosmic Race (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997).

3. José Carlos Mariátegui, The Heroic and Creative Meaning of Socialism (Humanity Books, 1996).

4. Gilberto Freyre, Brazil: An Interpretation (Kindle Edition).

5. Gioconda Belli, The Country Under My Skin: A Memoir of Love and War (Bloomsbury, 2003).

6. Juan F. Manzano, Autobiography of a Slave/Autobiografía de un esclavo (Wayne State Univ. Press, 1996).

+ Additional readings that will be made available through blackboard.

LAS 384L • Us Afr-Am/Lat Am Polit Thought

40447 • Fall 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as AFR 386, GOV 382M)

Despite the current trend towards the study of comparative political theory, the work of Latin American political thinkers, which has been tremendously influential in their own region, remains marginal to the canon of Western political thought. Likewise, the work of U.S. African-American political thinkers is an important yet often overlooked strand of [U.S.] American political thought. This course is an an introduction to the history of these two traditions, and a comparative effort to understand the main thematics in each and the similarities and differences between them. It examines the answers U.S. African-American and Latin American thinkers have given to some of the fundamental preoccupations of political theory, as well as to other questions that have sometimes been viewed as marginal, such as: What is justice? What is freedom? What are the conditions of possibility for democratic politics? How should we theorize race? How should we conceive racial identity? What form should anti-racist politics take? The course will introduce students to some of the most influential figures in U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, including: Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Martí, José Vasconcelos, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, as well as to contemporary thinkers and debates about racial justice and black, latino, and indigenous politics in the U.S. and Latin America. The aim of the course is to identify the contours and substantive problematics of U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, particularly as they relate to questions of racial justice. 

LAS 381 • Afr-Am & Latin Am Pol Thought

40410 • Spring 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as AFR 383, GOV 382M)

Despite the current trend towards the study of comparative political theory, the work of Latin American political thinkers, which has been tremendously influential in their own region, remains marginal to the canon of Western political thought. Likewise, the work of U.S. African-American political thinkers is an important yet often overlooked strand of [U.S.] American political thought. This course is an an introduction to the history of these two traditions, and a comparative effort to understand the main thematics in each and the similarities and differences between them. It examines the answers U.S. African-American and Latin American thinkers have given to some of the fundamental preoccupations of political theory, as well as to other questions that have sometimes been viewed as marginal, such as: What is justice? What is freedom? What are the conditions of possibility for democratic politics? How should we theorize race? How should we conceive racial identity? What form should anti-racist politics take? The course will introduce students to some of the most influential figures in U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, including: Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Martí, José Vasconcelos, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, as well as to contemporary thinkers and debates about racial justice and black, latino, and indigenous politics in the U.S. and Latin America. The aim of the course is to identify the contours and substantive problematics of U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, particularly as they relate to questions of racial justice.

LAS 384L • Latin American Polit Thought

40355 • Fall 2010
Meets M 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as GOV 382M)

Description: In spite of the tremendous influence that Latin American political thinkers have had in their own region, their work remains marginal to the canon of Western political theory. This course is an overview of the various traditions in the history of Latin American political thought. It examines the answers Latin American thinkers have given to some of the fundamental preoccupations of political theory from the perspective of the region’s social and political realities, such as: What is justice? What is the nature of the human? Under what conditions is popular sovereignty possible? What is the relationship between aesthetics and politics? What should be the relationship between religion and politics? How do we theorize culture and race? The course will introduce students to some of the most influential figures in Latin American political thought, including Bartolomé de las Casas, Simón Bolivar, Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Enrique Rodó, José Martí, José Vasconcelos, José Carlos Mariátegui, Ernesto ‘Ché’ Guevara, Gustavo Gutiérrez, as well as contemporary thinkers such as Walter Mignolo and Enrique Dussel. It will use this engagement with the history of political thought in Latin America to ask the following questions: To what extent can we say that there is a tradition of Latin American political thought? If so, what are its contours? What are the main problematics and principles of this tradition? To what extent does it reflect concerns specific to Latin America? To what extent does it speak to central questions in the canon of western political theory? How does it challenge the conceptual and methodological boundaries of that canon? And what, if any, is the difference between Latin American philosophy and Latin American political thought?


Grading Policy/Course Requirements:
Students will write three short (4 page) critical response essays about the readings.  
Students will also make one in-class presentation on the readings.
Final grades will be assessed based on three critical response essays (22% each for a total of 66%), in class presentation (18%), and class participation (16%).

Required Texts
1. Domingo F. Sarmiento, Facundo: Or, Civilization and Barbarism (Penguin Classics, 1998).
2. José Vasconcelos, The Cosmic Race (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997).
3. José Enrique Rodó, Ariel (University of Texas Press, 1998).
4. José Carlos Mariátegui, The Heroic and Creative Meaning of Socialism: Selected Essays of Jose Carlos Mariátegui (Humanity Books, 1996).
5. Gustavo Gutiérrez, A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics and Salvation (Orbis Books, 1998).
6. Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth (Grove Press, 2005).
Additional readings will be available through blackboard.

Publications


Hooker, Juliet. 2014. “Hybrid Subjectivities, Latin American Mestizaje, and Latino Political Thought on Race,” Politics, Groups, and Identities 2, 2 (2014): p. 188-201.

Hooker, Juliet. 2013. “Afro-descendants and Indigenous Rights,” Oxford Handbooks Online, Dec. 16, 2013.

Hooker, Juliet. 2012. “Negotiating Blackness within the Multicultural State: Creole Politics and Identity in Nicaragua,” in Kwame Dixon and John Burdick (eds.), Comparative Perspectives on Afro Latin America (Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2012), p. 264-281.

Hooker, Juliet. 2011. “Indigenous Rights in Latin America: How to Classify Afro-descendants?” in Will Kymlicka and Avigail Eisenberg (eds.), Identity Politics in the Public Realm: Bringing Institutions Back In (Vancouver, Canada: University of British Columbia Press, 2011), p. 104-136. 

Hooker, Juliet. 2010. “Race and the Space of Citizenship: the Mosquito Coast and the Place of Blackness and Indigeneity in Nicaragua,” in Lowell Gudmundson and Justin Wolfe (eds.), Blacks and Blackness in Central America: Between Race and Place (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010), p. 246-277.

Hooker, Juliet. 2009. Race and the Politics of Solidarity (NY: Oxford University Press, 2009).    

Hooker, Juliet. 2008. “Afro-descendant Struggles for Collective Rights in Latin America,” Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society 10, no. 3 (July-September 2008): p. 279-291. 

Hooker, Juliet. 2005b. “‘Beloved Enemies’: Race and Official Mestizo Nationalism in Nicaragua,” Latin American Research Review 40, no. 3 (October 2005): p. 14-39.

Hooker, Juliet. 2005a. “Indigenous Inclusion/Black Exclusion: Race, Ethnicity, and Multicultural Citizenship in Latin America,” Journal of Latin American Studies 37, no. 2 (May 2005): p. 285-310.

Curriculum Vitae


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  • Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
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    2300 Red River Street D0800
    Austin, Texas 78712