Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

Néstor P. Rodríguez


ProfessorPh.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Professor, Department of Sociology
Néstor P. Rodríguez

Contact

Interests


International migration and deportation issues; race and ethnic relations; urban sociology

Courses


LAS 381 • International Migration

39655 • Fall 2015
Meets W 600pm-900pm CLA 3.106
(also listed as MAS 392, SOC 389K)

 Course Rationale

International migration patterns have become highly dynamic since the late twentieth century.  The UN Population Division estimates the number of international migrants grew from 156 million in 1990 to 214 million by 2010.  This seminar uses a sociological approach to focus on the social organization of international migration and effects (including social and policy reactions) this migration has on settlement areas and communities of origin.  

The seminar is intended to consider and review cases and issues of migration across different countries and world regions, and not just patterns that affect the United States.

Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

 This seminar is designed to survey social research conducted across various topics (gender/women, policies, labor market integration, restrictions, etc.) of international migration, and concerning different national populations.

Specific Learning Objectives

Become familiar with conceptual and theoretical perspectives in international migration research

Become familiar with leading research issues and questions in international migration research

Become familiar with research methods and findings in prominent topics of international migration research.

Format and Procedures

 The course will follow a format in which reading, writing, and group discussion compose the central ctivities of the seminar. Graduate student participation is essential for the operation of the seminar.  

Assumptions

My assumptions of international migration are that it a) follows an historical course, b) flows from the interaction between human agency and social structures, c) takes normal paths of social division/tension and degrees of social incorporation, d) is affected by social constructions regarding different national-origin groups, and e) has a significance of being a resource for social reproduction within large social structures.

Religious Holidays

UT Austin policy requires that you notify course instructors at least 14 days in advance if you plan to be absent due to a religious holiday. You will be given an opportunity to make up activities (exams, assignments, etc.) that you miss because of your absence due to a religious holiday.  You will be given a reasonable time to make up an exam or assignment after your absence.

Seminar Books 

Castles, Stephen, Hein De Hass, & Mark J. Miller.  2014.  5th edition. The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World.  New York: Guilford Press. 

Hernández-León, Rubén.  2008.  Metropolitan Migrants: The Migration of Urban Mexicans to the United States. Berkeley: UC Press.

United Nations.  2009.  Human Development Report: 2009, Overcoming Barriers:  Human Mobility and Development. United Nations Development Program (UNDP), Palgrave Macmillian. (FREE on-line!)

http://hdr.undp.org/en/reports/global/hdr2009/papers/

Zhang, Li.  2001.  Strangers in the City:  Reconfigurations of Space, Power, and Social Networks within China’s Floating Population.  Stanford: Stanford University Press. 

Websites to keep in mind: 

UC-Davis, Migration News: http://migration.ucdavis.edu/mn/

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/

Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org/

Office of Immigration Statistics: http://www.dhs.gov/ximgtn/statistics/

Migration Policy Institute: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/

Pew Hispanic Center: http://pewhispanic.org/

United Nations: http://www.un.org/

International Organization for Migration: http://www.iom.int/jahia/Jahia/lang/en/pid/1

Seminar Requirements

Seminar attendance and participation policy:  Attendance is required at every seminar meeting; moreover, graduate students are expected to do the assigned weekly readings and come to the seminar prepared to engage in discussion about the topic covered for the week.  Seminar participation accounts for 10 percent of the final grade.  In addition, unexcused absences will reduce the grade average grade by three points for each absence. 

Graduate students will write a series of five short papers (3-5 pages) reacting to the assigned weekly readings. Each student will prepare a reaction paper to present in the seminar every other week. Each paper will be worth 20 points for a total of 100 points.

Finally, graduate students are required to write a seminar paper on a topic of international migration. The paper may take one of the following three forms:  a) a new research proposal draft for a thesis or dissertation, b) a critical annotated bibliography with an evaluative section to be used in preparation for a comprehensive examination, or c) a paper for submission to a conference or a journal. This assignment is worth 100 points. Students will present their paper assignments in the last weeks of the semester, but are strongly encouraged to update the seminar members regarding the progress of their papers. 

Reaction Paper

The goal of the reaction papers is to stimulate thought about international migration research. Various approaches can be taken to accomplish this. One approach is to focus on only one reading, and a second approach is to focus on more than one reading. If the first approach is taken, the student can critique the reading by addressing problems with conceptualization, research methods, or inconsistencies in the reading, or the student can elaborate on points covered in the reading by taking different perspectives into account (gender, different regional context, etc.).  When the second approach is taken, the student can compare two or more readings, or use more than one reading to elaborate on a topic.  Students can also use the reaction papers to elaborate, from the perspective of the readings, on their own ongoing interest or work in international migration or other research topic.  Please remember that a reaction paper is not suppose to be a summary of the readings. (Format: 3-5 pages double space; 1.0 – to 1.25-inch margins, 12-point font) 

Use of Canvas

I plan to use Canvas to make announcements, distribute information, communicate with students, and post grades.  Students are encouraged to use Canvas to communicate and share comments and information.  Please check your Canvas site regularly to look for communications from me or from other students in the class.  Support for using Canvas can be obtained from the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Thursday, 8-10pm and Friday, 8am to 6pm.  ITS has a walk-in help desk on the first floor of the Flawn Academic Center.

Grading

 a) Five reaction papers (100 points; 45% of total grade)

b) Seminar paper (100 points; 45% of total grade)

c) Seminar participation (22 points; 10% of total grade)

d) Unexcused absences reduce course grade by 3 point for each absence

Letter grades (A, B, C, D, F) based on percentage of total points: A = 90%-100%, B = 80%-89.5%, C = 70%-79.5%, D = 60%- 69.5%, F = less than 60%.

Grades will be assigned a plus or minus sign based on score in the usual decile point intervals, for example, 80 – 82 = B-, 83 – 86 = B, and 87 – 89 = B+.

Note:  I am authorized by the University to discuss grades only with students. 

LAS 381 • International Migration

40435 • Spring 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 214
(also listed as MAS 392, SOC 389K)

Seminar Description

 This seminar focuses on diverse patterns (Latin American, Asian, etc.) of international migration, how they are organized and how they affect societies and their populations across world regions.  The topics addressed in the seminar include the following:  historical and macro contexts of migration, the social organization of migration, gender/women and migration, impacts of economic restructuring, migration of highly skilled workers, levels of social incorporation, theories of international migration, state policies for immigration, restrictions against migrants, impacts of migration on sending communities and settlement areas.

Texts (others may be added or exchanged for listed ones)

Stephen Castles & Mark J. Miller.  2009.  The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World.  Guilford Press.

 Ruben Hernández-León.  2008.  Metropolitan Migrants: The Migration of Urban Mexicans to the United States. UC Press.

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo (ed.).  2003.  Gender and U.S. Immigration: Contemporary Trends.  UC Press.

 Anthony M. Messina & Gallya Lahav (eds.).  2006.  The Migration Reader: Exploring Politics and Policies.  Lynne Rienner.

 United Nations.  2009.  Human Development Report: 2009, Overcoming Barriers:  Human Mobility and Development. United Nations Development Program (UNDP), Palgrave Macmillian. (FREE on-line!)

http://hdr.undp.org/en/reports/global/hdr2009/papers/

 Li Zhang.  2001.  Strangers in the City:  Reconfigurations of Space, Power, and Social Networks within China’s Floating Population.  Stanford University Press.

 Grading

 Five reaction papers, 3-5 pages (100 points; 45% of total grade)

Seminar paper (100 points; 45% of total grade)

Seminar participation (22 points; 10% of total grade)

Curriculum Vitae


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  • Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    SRH 1.310
    2300 Red River Street D0800
    Austin, Texas 78712