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Colleen Gleeson Eils

Graduate Student

Contact

Biography

Colleen is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin. She earned her MA at UT in 2010 and her BA in English at Clemson University in 2008. She is currently working on her dissertation, tentatively titled "Narrative Privacy: Keeping Secrets in Contemporary Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American Metafictions." 

Interests

Twentieth century and contemporary Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American literatures

Publications

PUBLICATIONS

Article (Refereed):

“The Politics of Make-Believe: Dissimulation and Reciprocity in David Treuer’s The Translation of Dr. Apelles,” forthcoming Winter 2015 in Studies in American Indian Literatures 26.4.

Interview (Refereed):

“‘You’re Always More Famous When You’re Banished’: Gerald Vizenor on Citizenship, War, and Continental Liberty,” with Emily Lederman, Andrew Uzendoski, and Gerald Vizenor. Interview forthcoming Spring 2015 in American Indian Quarterly, 39.2.

Interview:

“An Interview with Gerald Vizenor” with Emily Lederman and Andrew Uzendoski in E3W Review of Books, Coloring Outside the Lines: Development, Deviance, and the Domestic, vol. 14 (Spring 2014): 28-30.

Book Reviews:

Thadious M. Davis. Southscapes: Geographies of Race, Region, & Literature, in E3W Review of Books, Literary Indictments: Bodies on Trial, in Prison, & Out of Bounds, vol. 13 (Spring 2013): 61-62.

Julia H. Lee. Interracial Encounters: Reciprocal Representations in African and Asian American Literatures, 1896-1937, in E3W Review of Books, Year of Seven Billion: Population Growth, Population Control, and Popular Movements, vol. 12 (Spring 2012): 25-27.

Janet A. Flammang. The Taste for Civilization: Food, Politics, and Civil Society, in E3W: Review of Books, Broken Paradigms: Towards Sustainable Strategies & Timely Tactics, vol. 11 (Spring 2011): 29-30.

Leslie Marmon Silko. Almanac of the Dead, in E3W Review of Books, Human Interests, Historical Investments, vol. 10 (Spring 2010): 35-36.

Presentations

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

“Fiction and Lies in Sherman Alexie’s ‘Dear John Wayne’ and Stephen Graham Jones’s Growing Up Dead in Texas.” Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) National Conference. Washington, D.C. June 2015. (upcoming)

“Formal Departure: Evading Textual Captivity in Monique Truong’s The Book of Salt.” The Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States (MELUS) National Conference. Athens, GA. April 2015. (upcoming)

“The Limits of Literature in Salvador Plascencia’s The People of Paper.” The Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States (MELUS) National Conference. Oklahoma City, OK. March 2014.

 “‘I was looking for a book:’ Audience and Translation in The Translation of Dr. Apelles.” 9th Annual Graduate Conference in Comparative Literature, University of Texas at Austin. Austin, TX. October 2012.

“‘If it Weren’t for Tequila and Pretty Señoritas’: Eating the Other in Country Music.” E3W Annual Sequels Conference. Austin, TX. April 2011.

“Colors, Maps, Artifacts: Imagining Alternative Literary and Publishing Environments in ¡Caramba!” Annual Meeting of the National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies (NAACS). Seattle, WA. April 2010.

“Anarchy Arrives: Robert Kaplan and the Rhetoric of Dehumanization.” Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice Annual Conference. Austin, TX. March 2009.

 

INVITED TALKS

Workshop. The Americas Project, Department of English, University of Texas at Austin. February 2015.

“Alumni Panel.” Undergraduate Scholars Program Administrators Association National Conference. Austin, TX. May 2013.

“Teaching in the Department of English.” Invited speaker, 398T: Supervised Teaching in English, University of Texas at Austin. Austin, TX. 2013.

Teaching

TEACHING (INSTRUCTOR OF RECORD)

Asian American Literature and Culture, Fall 2013

  • I designed and taught this discussion-based course to majors and non-majors. Students learned close reading, critical thinking, and research methods using Asian American literary and theoretical content.

Native American Literature and Culture, Fall 2012

  • I designed and taught this discussion-based literature course to majors and non-majors. Students learned close reading, critical thinking, and research methods using Native American literary and theoretical content.

The Rhetoric of Food, Fall 2011, Spring 2012

  • I designed and taught this rhetorical analysis and writing skills course. Students made arguments about food culture texts using theories of race, gender, and sexuality.

Rhetoric and Writing, Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Fall 2010

  • I taught the standard lower-division rhetorical analysis and writing skills course.

 

TEACHING DISTINCTION

Outstanding Assistant Instructor, Department of English, University of Texas, 2012-2013

 

UNDERGRADUATE WRITING CENTER


Consultant, 2010 - 2013

Group Mentor, 2011 - 2013

 

OTHER TEACHING EXPERIENCE (TEACHING ASSISTANT)

Young Adult Fiction and Film, Fall 2014

Interwar U.S. Literature, Summer 2011

Life and Literature of the Southwest, Spring 2010

Masterworks of American Literature, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Summer 2010

Masterworks of British Literature, Spring 2009

Fellowships & Awards

University of Texas Department of English Excellence Award, Spring 2014

MELUS President’s Graduate Student Travel Award, 2014

University of Texas Graduate School Professional Development Award, 2010, 2014

Outstanding Assistant Instructor, Department of English, University of Texas at Austin, 2012-13

Maureen Decherd Excellence Fellow, University of Texas at Austin, Spring 2013

Summer Fellowship, Department of English, University of Texas at Austin, 2011

Clemson University National Scholar, 2004-2008

Phi Beta Kappa, 2007

Professional References

James H. Cox

Professor, Department of English

University of Texas at Austin

204 W. 21st Street, B5000

Austin, Texas 78712-1164

jhcox@austin.utexas.edu

 

Domino R. Perez

Associate Professor, Department of English and CMAS

Director, Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS)

University of Texas at Austin

204 W. 21st Street, B5000

Austin, Texas 78712-1164

drperez@austin.utexas.edu

 

Julie A. Minich

Assistant Professor, Department of English

University of Texas at Austin

204 W. 21st Street, B5000

Austin, Texas 78712-1164

minichja@utexas.edu

 

Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández

Associate Professor, American Studies and Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

Chair, Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

University of Texas at Austin

2505 University Ave Stop B7100

Austin, TX 78712

ngh24@austin.utexas.edu

 

Phillip J. Barrish

Tony Hilfer Professor in American and British Literature

Director, Lower-Division Literature Program

University of Texas at Austin

204 W. 21st Street, B5000

Austin, Texas 78712-1164

pbarrish@austin.utexas.edu

Academic Appointments

Assistant Director, Department of English Lower-Division Literature Program, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-2015

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Texas at Austin

  • Domino Perez, Center for Mexican American Studies, 2014-2015
  • Heather Houser, book project: Ecosickness in Contemporary U.S. Fiction: Environment and Affect (Columbia UP), 2013
  • James H. Cox, book project: The Red Land to the South: American Indian Writers and Indigenous Mexico (Minnesota UP), Summer 2011

Assistant Instructor, University of Texas at Austin

  • Department of English, 2012-2014
  • Department of Rhetoric and Writing, 2010-2012

Teaching Assistant, University of Texas at Austin, Department of English, 2008-2010, 2014