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Robert Vega, Director FAC 18 / 2304 Whitis Ave. Stop G6200 78712-1508 • 512-471-7900

Entercom

Spring 2012 Site Review

Position: Promotions Intern
Student: Rhetoric & Writing Junior

A typical day as a Promotions Intern at Entercom Radio Corp. is casual, but even in the dead moments - radio has it's busy and not-so-busy months, appropriate when advertisements are most listened to during the year - the interns still stay busy doing online social media work, as well as helping in the studio or working in the sales department of the station. I considered this a blessing in disguise to be working during the dead months, not only because I have stayed very busy in my first semester of my Junior year with 16 hours, but also because it gave me the opportunity to build upon my resume. The different tasks I was given as "busy work" were actually resume-building opportunities and are really going to help me in the long run.

The online social media updating is the core of a Promotions intern’s day working for a radio station. The interns work in the Promotions room where all the advertisers’ products are stored to give away at remotes which are typically scheduled during weekends (that’s when listeners are able to make time to come to the events held).  In this room, are two desks - two interns usually working the same shift. During the morning shift, the interns prepare Twitter updates, Facebook posts, and keep the station websites (Mix 94.7 and Majic 95.5) up-to-date with upcoming events the station holds, as well as what might be going on around the community. This job is especially important because without promoting events that are paid for by other companies for radio to advertise, the public (listeners and outside listeners) would be unaware of event opportunities, the advertising would fail, the company would not get what they paid for and would therefore not choose to advertise with Entercom again. These big promotions through the radio AND the remotes held are what keep radio still running today.

After the intern finishes with these social media tasks given, sometimes taking an entire shift depending on the updates, we are then given the "busy work.” This includes the subbing in to help in the Sales department, organizing the promotions room, getting together the remote bins (stuffing full of appropriate products for the marketing occasion), or helping with more simple tasks like faxes or e-mails. Even these smaller tasks make a huge difference to the employer seeking the help.

During the weekends, the interns are assigned typically one remote (every 1-2 weeks). These remotes, usually held from morning to late afternoon, include a variety of companies that pay the station to get listeners to come out to their site and hopefully invest in whatever product they are trying to promote to the public. Some for example I have worked have been for companies like Cricket Wireless, KB Homes, and grand openings of numerous places - mostly bigger companies who can invest in the advertising such as HEB. Some events have multiple vendors, others the station is the only table running. A DJ is also assigned to attend, where they can go live while on the site to get listeners to come show up last minute if they haven’t already heard. During this, the promotions team has set up the table with all the products nicely placed, and are reeling in walk-by individuals with free-give aways if they choose to come check out the event being held.

While the station is slow, the intern is never. Although Entercom interns are always kept busy, the mood still remains casual, which is personal liking. My co-workers have been such a blast to work with, and have taught me so many new skills. It is guaranteed a great interning semester at Entercom, where many future opportunities are sure to come from. I will miss my days as an Entercom Promotions Intern.

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