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Dr. Elizabeth Richmond-Garza, Director 208 W. 21st St. Stop B5003, Austin, Tx 78712 • 512-471-1925

Course Descriptions

C L 305 • Vampire In Slavic Cultures

32760 • Garza, Thomas
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.306
(also listed as EUS 307, REE 302)
show description

FLAGS:   GC

Description:

Eight hundred years before Bram Stoker gave us the West's most memorable vampire in Dracula (1897) and long before the exploits of Vlad "the Impaler" Tepes horrified Europe (1431-46), the Russian Primary Chronicles write of a Novgorodian priest as Upyr' Likhij, or Wicked Vampire (1047).  The Slavic and Balkan worlds abound in histories, legends, myths and literary portraits of the so-called undead, creatures that literally draw life out of the living. This course examines the vampire in the cultures of Russia and Eastern Europe, including manifestations in literature, religion, art, film and common practices from its origins to 2013.  Texts – both print and non-print media – will be drawn from Russian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Serbian and Croatian sources.  Participants will be asked to separate historical fact from popular fiction, and form opinions about the place of the vampire in Slavic and East European cultures. 

Prerequisites:  The course is conducted in English.  No knowledge of Russian required, though readings in Russian and other Slavic languages are available for majors and concentrators in these related fields.

Readings:   • The Vampire in Slavic Culture, Course Reader (CR), T. J. Garza, ed., Cognella Press, San Diego: CA, 2010. [order online]

• The Vampire: A Casebook, Alan Dundes, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1998.

[at the UT Co-op]

Grading:         

Short essay I (3-4 pp.)          25%                            

Midterm exam I                    25%

Short essay II (3-4 pp.)         25%                            

Midterm exam II                  25%

C L 315 • World Literature

32770-32810 • Doherty, Brian
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WEL 1.316
(also listed as E 316N)
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E 316N  l  World Literature

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  34340-34380

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Flags:  Global Cultures

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

Global Modern Literature—

The course will be run in four sections. The first will be reading in literary periods from The Enlightenment through Romanticism and Realism. The second will continue the historical sequence into Modernism, then do some reading in how modernism can be thought of as a global phenomenon. Early in the semester students will choose the cultures we will read for the second half of the course. Choices will include Africa, India (South Asia), East Asia (China, Japan, Vietnam, South Korea), and North Africa and the Modern Middle East.

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays. From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world. It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Puchner, Martin, ed. Third Edition, Volumes D-E-F. (It is essential that students have the Third Edition.)

Requirements & Grading: Attendance, participation in TA led discussions: 10%; Test one: Enlightenment through Realism: 15%; Test Two: Global Modernisms: 20%; Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 20%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

C L 315 • World Literature

32815 • Doherty, Brian
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GDC 2.402
(also listed as E 316N)
show description

E 316N  l  World Literature

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  34385

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Flags:  Global Cultures

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

Global Modern Literature—

The course will be run in four sections. The first will be reading in literary periods from The Enlightenment through Romanticism and Realism. The second will continue the historical sequence into Modernism, then do some reading in how modernism can be thought of as a global phenomenon. Early in the semester students will choose the cultures we will read for the second half of the course. Choices will include Africa, India (South Asia), East Asia (China, Japan, Vietnam, South Korea), and North Africa and the Modern Middle East.

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays. From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world. It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Puchner, Martin, ed. Third Edition, Volumes D-E-F. (It is essential that students have the Third Edition.)

Requirements & Grading: Attendance, participation 10%; Test one: Enlightenment through Realism: 15%; Test Two: Global Modernisms: 20%; Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 20%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

C L 323 • Anti-Semitism In Hist & Lit

32830 • Hoberman, John
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GEA 114
(also listed as EUS 346, GSD 360, J S 364)
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FLAGS:   GC  |  Wr  | EL

Description:

The origins of Western (Christian) anti-Semitism can be traced to the Gospel of St John in the New Testament, which stigmatizes the Jews as “the children of the Devil.” Anti-Semitism thus originates in the religious feud that gradually intensified between the Jewish community and the followers of Jesus Christ. The early Church Fathers denounced the Jews using the most violent language, and a pattern was established. The first part of the course consists of an examination of the Christian critique of the Jews through the Middle Ages.

The second part of the course focuses primarily on the development of an intensified anti-Semitism in Europe during the 19th and 20th centuries, culminating in the Holocaust in Europe. Literary texts by Henri de Montherlant, Somerset Maugham, Aharon Applefeld, Ernest Hemingway, and Georges Perec are used to explore the nature of anti-Semitic perspectives on the Jews as a group or “tribe.” The course covers anti-Semitic developments up to the present day.

Selected Readings:

Ashley Montagu, "Are 'the' Jews a Race?" in Man's Most Dangerous Myth: The Fallacy of Race (1974): 353-377.

Léon Poliakov, "The Fateful Summer of 1096," in The History of Anti-Semitism, Vol. 1 (1974): 41-72. 

Léon Poliakov, "Activated Anti-Semitism: Germany," in The History of Anti-Semitism, Vol. 1 (1974): 210-245.

Joshua Trachtenberg, The Devil and the Jews (1943): 11-52.

David I. Kertzer, "Introduction," in The Popes Against the Jews: The Vatican's Role in the Rise of Modern Anti-Semitism  (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2001): 3-21.

George L. Mosse, "Eighteenth-Century Foundations," "The Birth of Stereotypes," "Nation, Language, and History," in Toward the Final Solution (1978): 1-50. 

John M. Efron, "The Jewish Body Degenerate?" in Medicine and the German Jews: A History (2001): 105-150.

Maurice Fishberg, "Pathological Characteristics," in The Jews: A Study of Race and Environment (1912): 270-295.

Somerset Maugham, “The Alien Corn” (1931).

Henri de Montherlant, “A Jew-Boy Goes to War” (1926).

Jean-Paul Sartre, Anti-Semite and Jew (1946): 7-54.

Michael H. Kater, “Everyday Anti-Semitism in Prewar Nazi Germany: The Popular Bases” (1984): 129-159.

Grading:

Examination #1  — 20% of grade

Examination #2 — 20% of final grade

Paper #1 (4 pages) — 10% of final grade

Paper #2 (4 pages) — 10% of final grade

Paper #3 (10 pages) — 40% of final grade

C L 323 • Exhibitionism/Public Spectacle

32835 • Arens, Katherine
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 214
(also listed as EUS 347, GRG 356T, GSD 360)
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FLAGS:   GC

Description:

This course will follow some of today's and history's most visible "public spectacles" from Northern and Central Europe.  It will show how scholars deal with public exhibitions (like World's Fairs), museum spaces, memorials, pubic images and scandals to introduce questions about how public spaces are used to create and recreate national histories, public memories, identities, and media power. 

The work in this course will allow you to evolve your own project on public memory or spectacles in Northern and Central Europe, which might include (but are not restricted to) iconic buildings (Berlin's TV-Tower, Stockholm City Hall), war monuments, world fairs, museums (Rijksmuseum in the Netherlands, Art museums in other major cities), museum exhibitions (Vienna 1900), and public media identities claimed by the public media in demonstrations and the media (Love Parade, Jörg Haider, "Baader Meinhof").

Readings:

Carl Schorske, Fin de siècle Vienna

Foote, Kenneth E. Shadowed Ground: America's Landscapes of Violence and Tragedy

Lefebvre, Production of Space

Boym, Future of Nostalgia

Websites for public art and museums

Grading:

Site analysis:  short precis  --3 x 5% of grade

Annotated bibliography:  15% of grade

Short presentation (5 pp): 20 % of Grade

Project proposal and research plan (5 pp): 20% of Grade

Final Paper: 30% of Grade

C L 323 • Modern Islam & Pop Fiction

32836 • Mohammad, Afsar
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.204
(also listed as ANS 320, ISL 372, R S 373)
show description

FLAGS:   GC

 

DESCRIPTION:

In this course, we will focus on various literary representations of modern Islam in contemporary popular fiction. Ever since the 1900s, Islam came to be redefined globally, as several modernist and post-modernist scholars/writers/artists began to turn their attention towards it, thus paving the way for what can be called a “Modern Islam.” Consequently, Islam has become a complicated site, which continuously goes through multiple revisions, making it difficult to speak of one narrative of Islam and Islamic belonging. We will read selections from major novels, a few stories and autobiographical essays published and well-discussed since the 1980s. These literary works represent Islam in its multiple complexities and differences. In order to figure out how these writers of popular novelistic texts represent Islam at the crossroads of modernity, we will engage with theories of modernity.

 

TEXT:

1.Aslan, Reza. Tablet and Pen: Literary Landscapes from the Modern Middle-East, W.W.Norton and Company. 2011. ISBN-13: 978-0393340778

 

2. Hamid, Mohsin. The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Harvest Books. 2008. ISBN-13: 978-0156034029

 

3. Antoon, Sinan. The Corpse-washer, Yale University Press, 2014. ISBN-13: 978-0300205640 4.Abdul-Ghafur, Saleema. Living Islam Out Loud: American Muslim Women Speak, Beacon Press, 2005. ISBN-13: 978-0807083833

           

GRADING:

Weekly Online informal Journal (1-100 word post per week), worth 25% of final grade Reflective Assessment I (1500 words) worth 20% of final grade Oral Presentation (15 minutes class presentation followed by questions and answers), worth 20% of final grade Reflective Assessment II (2000 words), worth 25% of final grade Performance as a Peer Editor, worth 10% of final grade Required Class Activities: University Lectures PCL-Database Instruction session A Visit to the Harry Ransom Research Center

C L 323 • Israel/Palestine: Cultrl Persp

32838 • Grumberg, Karen
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 301
(also listed as J S 363, MEL 321, MES 342)
show description

This upper-division course approaches the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians through a multifaceted cultural lens. The course begins with a consideration of the two major national identities at stake to better understand how they contribute to the collective imagination and to representations of the conflict. To this end, the semester is divided into five sections, each one devoted to a different cultural phenomenon: 1. Visual Culture (Film, photography, art) 2. Literature (Novels, short stories, poetry, theater) 3. Music 4. Spatial Culture (Architecture and Landscape) 5. New Media (Blogs, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram) The goal is for students to be exposed to the multivalent and complex reverberations of the conflict beyond the political and into the everyday lived experience of being Israeli and Palestinian -- in other words, to humanize the conflict through culture.

Texts

Texts will include (among others): - films: Ari Folman’s Waltz with Bashir, Eran Riklis’s Zaytoun, and Elia Suleiman’s Divine Intervention; - photography exhibits such as Bashir Makhoul’s Enter Ghost, Exit Ghost and Noel Jabbour’s Palestinian Interiors; - art such as Sivan Hurvitz’s graphic illustrations; - writings by Amos Oz (Nomad and Viper), Etgar Keret (Cocked and Locked), David Grossman (excerpts from The Yellow Wind), Mahmoud Darwish (poetry), and Ghassan Kanafani (from In the Land of the Sad Orange); - music by Daniel Barenboim and Edward Said’s West-Eastern Divan Orchestra as well as traditional and popular artists; - essays on the importance of particular landscape features (such as olive and eucalyptus trees, forests, and the sea) as well as features or types of built environment (the kibbutz, the Palestinian village); - blog posts and new media campaigns for awareness and activism (Electronic Intifada, Jewish Voice for Peace, and others).

Grading Policy

Partner or Group Presentations: 15%. Students will present either in small groups on one of the five categories outlined above. The topic will be chosen in consultation with the instructor and will entail research. Presentations will be ongoing throughout the semester. - Analytical Paper: 20%. A critical comparative analysis of two texts (4-5 pages). - Essay Exams: An essay-based midterm exam (20%) and a final exam (25%). - Participation (20%): Vigorous, regular participation in class discussion. - Possible Extra-Credit Assignments: A creative project (a short film, work of art, poem, etc., relevant to the class topic); a response or short reaction paper to a relevant text not on the syllabus; a response or short reaction paper to a relevant lecture.

C L 323 • Russian Cinema: Potemkin-Putin

32839 • Petrov, Petre
Meets MW 300pm-430pm JES A303A
(also listed as REE 325)
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FLAGS:   GC

Description:

The course is intended as a general introduction to the history of Russian-Soviet film. It will survey landmark cinematic texts from the early days of filmmaking in Russia to the present. In viewing and discussing these films, we will also be following the course of Russian social and cultural history. The goal, thus, is not only to acquaint students with major achievements of Russian cinema, but to use these as a gateway to mapping the broader territory of Russian culture over a turbulent century.

Readings:

The Battleship Potemkin (Sergei Eisenstein, 1925)

Man with a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)

Chapaev (Vassiliev Brothers, 1934)

Ivan the Terrible, Part II (Sergei Eisenstein, 1944)

The Cranes Are Flying (Mikhail Kalatozov, 1956)

Ivan’s Childhood (Andrei Tarkovskii, 1962)

Autumn Marathon (Georgii Daneliia, 1979)

Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears (Vladimir Menshov, 1980)

Little Vera (Vasilii Pichul, 1988)

Brother (Aleksei Balabanov, 1997)

Peter Kenez, Cinema and Soviet Society: From the Revolution to the Death of Stalin. NY: I.B. Tauris, 2008

Richard Taylor and Ian Christie, Eds. The Film Factory: Russian and Soviet Cinema in Documents, 1896-1939. Cambridte: Harvard UP, 1988.

Grading:

Class participation 20%

Weekly viewing journal 30%

Midterm exam 20%

Final paper/exam 30%

C L 323 • Russian/Mexican Men In Pop Cul

32840 • Garza, Thomas
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 130
(also listed as MAS 374, REE 325, WGS 340)
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FLAGS:   GC  |  CD

Description:

Over the past twenty-five years, the image of urban Mexican and Russian men has changed; the physically strong, often violent, and emotionally unavailable male of 1990s film, television, and popular music has been replaced by the more balanced, emotional, and cerebral performances of the 2000s. While still maintaining their mantle of macho, i.e., powerful, attractive, and decisive masculinity, the New Machos of the New Millennium in Mexico and Russia represent cultural transformations of masculinity. They reflect the need for a “feminized,” but not emasculated, male cultural hero to counterbalance the harsh and crude reality of male-dominated criminal life and the men who participate in it. In effect, these recent portraits eschew more traditional popular portraits of machismo, while maintaining the social and cultural status of masculinity in both. And they do so in dialogue with each other. This course undertakes the study of representations of masculinity in products of Mexican and Russian popular culture at the end of the twentieth and the beginning of the twenty-first centuries.

In both Mexican/Mexican-American and Slavic studies, much recent attention has been focused on the role and place of men in cultural, political, and social environments have appeared and received critical praise. This course juxtaposes these influential cultural portraits of masculinity in popular culture: Mexican and Russian. The course constitutes a comparative study of the performance of masculinity in Russian and Mexican cultures. It provides with provocative cultural perspectives on what it means to be macho in the twenty-first century. The course will engage texts from cultural, gender, ethnic, and media studies, as well from Slavic and Latino studies.

Readings:

• Adams, Rachel and David Savran, eds. 2002. The Masculinity Studies Reader. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

• Kimmel, Michael. 2010. Misframing Men: The Politics of Contemporary Masculinities. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

• Gutmann, Matthew C., ed. 2003. Changing Men and Masculinities in Latin America. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

• Macías-Gonzalez, Victor M. and Rubenstein, Anne, eds. 2012. Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.

• Borenstein, Eliot. 2008. Overkill: Sex and Violence in Contemporary Russian Popular Culture. Ithica: Cornell University Press.

• Clements, Barbara Evans, Friedman, Rebecca and Healey, Dan, eds. Russian Masculinities in History and Culture. 2002. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

• Norris, Stephen M. and Zara M. Torlone, eds. 2008. Insiders and Outsiders in Russian Cinema. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Grading:

Shorter essay (4-5 pp.)                                25%

Film Review (2-3 pp.)                                   20%

Seminar presentation                                   20%

Longer Paper (8-10)                                     25%

Participation                                               10%

C L 323 • Women/Resistnc Contemp E Euro

32844 • Lutsyshyna, Oksana
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 228
(also listed as EUS 347, REE 325, WGS 340)
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FLAGS:   GC

Course description:

This course will examine works of a number of Eastern European women writers, such as Olga Tokarczuk (Poland), Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus), Oksana Zabuzhko (Ukraine), Dubravka Ugresic (Croatia), Herta Muller (Romania – Germany), Sofi Oksanen (Finland), and Ludmila Petrushevskaya (Russia), and trace their role and involvement in resisting not only political regimes but also gender-based oppression. We will also read supplemental articles, interviews, and secondary sources to provide a general understanding of contemporary politics and ethnic conflict as well as gender roles in Eastern Europe. Through class discussion, students will discuss the many forms and repercussions of women's resistance to recent issues and events within this strategic region. 

Readings:

Muller, Herta. The Land of Green Plums. Transl. Michael Hofmann. Picador, 2010.

ISBN-10: 0312429940

Alexievich, Svetlana. Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear

Disaster. Trans. Keith Gessen. Picador, 2006. ISBN-10: 0312425848.

Oksanen, Sofi. Purge. Trans. Lola Rogers. Grove Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 0802170773.

Petrushevskaya, Ludmila. There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her

Neighbor’s Baby: Scary Fairy Tales. Trans. Keith Gessen. Penguin, 2009. ISBN-10: 0143114662.

Tokarczuk, Olga. Primeval and Other Times. Trans. Antonia Lloyd-Jones. Twisted

Spoon Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 8086264351.

Ugresic, Dubravka. The Culture of Lies: Antipolitical Essays. Penn State UP, 1998.

ISBN-10: 027101847X.

Ugresic, Dubravka. Thank You for Not Reading. Dalkey Archive Press, 2003. ISBN-

10: 1564782980

Zabuzhko, Oksana. Fieldwork in Ukrainian Sex. Trans. Halyna Hryn.

AmazonCrossingEnglish, 2011. ISBN-10: 1611090083.

Grading:

Journals, 1-2 page long, on authors of choice (4)             20 %

To in-class exams                                                                   20 %

Final paper (may be based on one of the journals)           30 %

Presentation                                                                             20%

Participation                                                                             10%­

C L 323 • Caribbean Literature

32845 • Wilks, Jennifer M.
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 304
(also listed as AFR 374F, E 360L)
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E 360L  l  2-Caribbean Literature

Instructor:  Wilks, J

Unique #:  34560

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  AFR 374F, C L 323

Flags:  Global Cultures; Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Through a survey of texts from English-, French-, and Spanish-speaking islands, this course seeks to address the complexity of the Caribbean as a geographic construct, that is, the chain of islands stretching from North to South America, and as an imagined site, that is, the tropical destination marketed to North American and European tourists. To do so we will supplement our reading of literary texts from the region with the examination of travel-related texts about the region. Throughout the semester we will consider how the dynamics of slavery and colonialism differed from island to island and explore the multiple manifestations of “postcolonial” life that have emerged across the archipelago since the 1960s. The course will conclude with an examination of the migration of Caribbean authors and texts to the United States and of the resulting development of hyphenated Caribbean-American identities. All texts will be read in English, and the list of proposed texts is subject to change.

Texts: Derek Walcott, “The Antilles: Fragments of Epic Memory,” What the Twilight Says; Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Place; Caryl Phillips, Cambridge;Cristina García, Monkey Hunting;Edwidge Danticat, The Farming of Bones; Junot Díaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

Requirements & Grading: Two short papers (4 pages each), 40%; Final critical essay (8-10 pages), 25%; Reading journal, 15%; Rough draft, 10%, Class presentation, 10%.

C L 323 • Slavs In Western Imaginatn

32859 • Kuzmic, Tatiana
Meets TTH 930am-1100am NOA 1.110
(also listed as REE 325)
show description

"Russians and Serbs and Poles, oh my!" -- Slavs in Western Imagination explores literary works and some popular culture items from Western Europe and North America that feature various Slavic characters in the roles of villain, rebel, romantic lover, manipulative marriage-wrecker, etc.  The course will address such questions as how the boundary between East and West came to exist within Europe (one historian argues that it pre-dates the Cold War by a couple of centuries), why, for example, the West has been obsessed with the idea that one of the royal Russian princesses (Anastasia) survived the communist purge, and what Sting meant in his song by "I hope the Russians love their children too."  We will cover some of the West's best-known literary classics as well scenes from HBO's Sex and the City where Carrie dates a Russian artist.

C L 323 • The Qur'an

32860 • Azam, Hina
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as CTI 375, ISL 340, MEL 321, MES 342, R S 325G, WGS 340)
show description

In this course, we will study the religion of Islam through its sacred text, the Qur’an. To this end, this course will entail extensive reading of the Qur’an itself, as well as of other texts. In our studies, we will focus on the following themes of the Qur’an: cosmology and theology, ethical principles, ritual prescriptions, and legal injunctions. We will also examine some of the prominent symbols, images and rhetorical structures of the Qur’an. Through reading the prophetic narratives, we will have an opportunity to compare Qur’anic and Biblical accounts of the major prophets shared by Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The syllabus also includes an inquiry into role of the Qur’an in Muslim devotion and as a medium for artistic expression. We will also discuss the tradition of interpretation (or “exegesis”), especially as it pertains to those verses that engender the most debate today: those surrounding politics, intercommunal (i.e. interreligious) relations, and women/gender. Prior knowledge of Islam is helpful but not required for this course.

Texts

  • William E. Shepard, Introducing Islam (2nd edition, Routledge, 2014)
  • John A. Williams, The Word of Islam (1st edition, University of Texas Press, 1994)

Additional readings will be selected from the following authors/works:

  • Fazlur Rahman, Major Themes of the Qur’an
  • Imam al-Ghazali (d.1111), Inner Dimensions of Islamic Worship (The Islamic Foundation)

Grading Policy

  • Final exam – 30%
  • 2 Tests – 25% each (50%)
  • Class attendance 20%

C L 323 • Decoding Cla Chinese Poetry

32865 • Lai, Chiu-Mi
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.204
(also listed as ANS 372)
show description

FLAGS:   GC

  • REQUIRED TEXTS:
  • John Minford and Joseph S.M. Lau, eds. Classical Chinese Literature – An Anthology of Translations, Volume I: From Antiquity to the Tang Dynasty (Columbia, 2002)
  • Please purchase the following required course packet at the University Co-op (includes):
  • David Hawkes, A Little Primer of Tu Fu (Rpt. Renditions, 1995)
  • Michael Sullivan, The Three Perfections: Chinese Painting, Poetry and Calligraphy (Revised edition: George Braziller, 1999)

This course will provide an introduction to the classical Chinese poetic tradition and is open to all students.  No previous background in Chinese language, culture or literature is required.  Readings in English translation will encompass a selective sampling of poetry from as early as the seventh century B.C.E. through the 9th century.  Lectures and discussions will focus on the literary, cultural, historical, social, political, philosophical, and religious background against which these representative works in poetry arose.  While background reading will be assigned, the focus of lectures and discussion will be on the primary works of poetry.  Course emphasis will be given to poetry of the medieval period of the Tang dynasty (618-907) which is commonly referred to as the “golden age” of Chinese poetry.  Intensive focus and close readings will be given to poetry on the moon by four of pre-modern China’s greatest and most beloved poets, Tao Yuanming 陶淵明 (or Tao Qian 陶潛) (365-427), Wang Wei 王維 (701-761), Li Bo李白 (or Li Bai) (701-762), and Du Fu 杜甫 (712-770). 

The grade for this course will be based on the following:

There is a class attendance policy for this course.  There is no final exam.

 I.          Discussion (15%) 

15%     Class and online discussion, participation and “preparedness”

           In-class Informal Writing and weekly Lead Discussant work

 II.        Writing and Oral Presentation (80%)

50%     Discussion Questions / Expanded Written Responses

25%     Critical Writing (Response Essay, Research Inquiry/Project Paper)

5%       Oral Presentation and leading discussion (selected topic)

 III.       Creative Writing: imitation and matching poems (5%)

5%       Creative Writing: imitation and matching poems (evaluated CR/NC)

 

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