Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
complit masthead
Dr. Wayne Rebhorn, Director 208 W. 21st St. Stop B5003, Austin, Tx 78712 • 512-471-1925

Chien-hsin Tsai

Assistant Professor Ph.D., Harvard University

Assistant Professor of Chinese
Chien-hsin Tsai

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-1302
  • Office: WCH 5.104B
  • Office Hours: T 11:00-14:00
  • Campus Mail Code: G9300

Biography

Dr. Tsai's focuses are in Modern Chinese literary and cultural studies, with particular interests in literature as ground of representation as well as sensorium; Sinophone studies; and colonial literature from Taiwan in Chinese and Japanese alike.

Recent publications:

 

2013 “At the Crossroads: Orphan of Asia, Postloyalism, and Sinophone Studies,” Sun Yat-Sen Journal of Humanities 35.2

2012 “The Heterotopic Agent in Chu T’ien-hsin’s ‘The Old Capital,’” Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies 38.2

2011 "In Sickness of in Health: Yan Lianke and the Writing of Autoimmunity." Modern Chinese Literature and Culture, vol. 23, no. 1 (Spring 2011), pp. 77-104

2011 "The Museum of Innoence: The Great Leap Forward and Famine, Yan Lianke, and Four Books" http://mclc.osu.edu/rc/pubs/tsai2.htm

 

 

C L 305 • Forbidn Romance Mod Chi Lit

33000 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 3.104
(also listed as ANS 301M )
show description

This course is an introduction to Chinese literature from the late Qing (the second half of the 19th century) to the present with a less-explored but nevertheless important dimension: romance and the legitimacy of its representation. We will engage in topics such as the literary construction of romantic subjects in response to socio-political and intellectual provocations, gender studies, and the proliferation of amorous engagements as they pertain to our understanding of modern Chinese literary and cultural studies. We will problematize the notion that literature is a reflection of reality, and call attention to how textual representations of intimacy, despair, loyalty, to name only a few, provide writers unlikely passages to traverse or fortify consensual, legal, and moral boundaries.

C L 305 • Forbidden Romance Mod Chi Lit

32830 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 4.104
(also listed as ANS 301M )
show description

This course is an introduction to Chinese literature from the late Qing (the second half of the 19th century) to the present with a less-explored but nevertheless important dimension: romance and the legitimacy of its representation. We will engage in topics such as the literary construction of
romantic subjects in response to socio-political and intellectual provocations, gender studies, and the proliferation of amorous engagements as they pertain to our understanding of modern Chinese literary and cultural studies. We will examine varied textual representations of emotion and passion and reconsider the notion that literature is a reflection of reality.

TEXTS:

Yu Dafu, "Sinking"
Xu Dishan, "Chuntao"
Eileen Chang, Love in a Fallen City
Chu T'ien-wen, Notes of a Desolate Man
Chen Ran, A Private Life
Li Ang, The Butcher's Wife
Other selected electronic readings

GRADING:

Attendance and Participation 15%
Weekly Reading Responses 15%
Two Writing Assignments 40%
Final Exam 30%

Publications

2013 “At the Crossroads: Orphan of Asia, Postloyalism, and Sinophone Studies,” Sun Yat-Sen Journal of Humanities 35.2

2012 “The Heterotopic Agent in Chu T’ien-hsin’s ‘The Old Capital,’” Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies 38.2

2011 "In Sickness of in Health: Yan Lianke and the Writing of Autoimmunity." Modern Chinese Literature and Culture, vol. 23, no. 1 (Spring 2011), pp. 77-104

2011 "The Museum of Innoence: The Great Leap Forward and Famine, Yan Lianke, and Four Books" http://mclc.osu.edu/rc/pubs/tsai2.htm

 

 

bottom border