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Dr. Wayne Rebhorn, Director 208 W. 21st St. Stop B5003, Austin, Tx 78712 • 512-471-1925

Elizabeth Richmond-Garza

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1992, Columbia University

Associate Professor; Director, Program in Comparative Literature
Elizabeth Richmond-Garza

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 232-5708
  • Office: PAR 119
  • Office Hours: By appointment only.
  • Campus Mail Code: B5003

Biography

Elizabeth Richmond-Garza is Associate Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the Director of the Program in Comparative Literature and chief administrative and financial officer of the American Comparative Literature Association. She holds degrees from U. C. Berkeley, Oxford University and Columbia University and has held both Mellon and Fulbright Fellowships. Trained in Greek as well as modern aesthetics, she works actively in eight languages. Her research concentrates on Orientalism, the Gothic, Cleopatra, Oscar Wilde, and European drama.  She is currently finishing a study of decadent culture at the end of the nineteenth century. Richmond-Garza is renowned for her creative, multi-media approach to teaching. Among other honors, she has been awarded the Chad Oliver Plan II Teaching Award, the 16th annual Friar Centennial Teaching Fellowship, and the Minnie Piper Stevens Teaching Award.  She was elected to the Academy of Distinguished Teachers in 2004 and was awarded the Regents' Outstanding Teaching Award in 2009.

Interests

Nineteenth and twentieth century European drama, Renaissance drama, Oscar Wilde, the Gothic and Orientalism, Decadence, Aesthetic and literary theory, literature and the fine arts

C L 315 • Masterworks Of Lit: World

33925-33970 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 1.402
(also listed as E 316K )
show description

Instructor:  Richmond-Garza, E            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35600-35645            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 315            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Global Literature and Culture --

What is a “self,” an individual? Is it a single entity or is it always entangled with others? Is it something created by history, by politics, by art, by culture or by the divine? Or does it fashion itself? Does it change over time and across space? At some level, art is always concerned with making and unmaking the individual and with freeing or chaining this being. Tracking texts from Classical Greece, Iraq and India to medieval Europe and Japan, we will focus on the continuing, and sometimes desperate, attempts of ancient and early modern artists and authors both to phrase and to answer this question. Expected names from the western canon, like Euripides, Shakespeare, Goethe and Baudelaire will keep company with Japan’s Bashô, Russia’s Pushkin, Argentina’s Borges and Nigeria’s Achebe.

We shall not limit ourselves only to the western canon but will look at points of crisis where, whether because of gender, race, ideology or class, an individual’s voyage of discovery will demand answers and action. We shall trace a drama of self-actualization, more than two thousand years old, one that is still being enacted. From the extremities of the Greek stage to a lonely cry of agony in the Assyrian desert, from ideal Platonic love to its witty and non-dialectical Asian counterparts, from a Parisian’s insomnia in 1900 to the painful experience of post-colonial Africa, from compulsive gambling to uncanny hauntings, from the dark voyages of Romantic self-discovery to imagined journeys through magical lands, we shall explore the limits of this question’s answers.

While the basis of the course will be the literary texts, we shall pillage often and importantly the resources of the other arts of painting, sculpture and film especially to conjure back to life the spirits of these past identities in preparation for a spring in which we shall interrogate our own century as it emerges from the twilight of the twentieth-century experiment.

Texts: All selections will be from The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces (Expanded Edition in One Volume, 1997), and will include: Gilgamesh; Euripides, Medea; selections from Chuang Chou; Kalidasa, Sakuntala; selections from The Thousand and One Nights; Montaigne, “Of Cannibals;” Shakespeare, Hamlet; Basho, The Narrow Road to the Interior; Goethe, Faust; Baudelaire, from The Flowers of Evil; Pushkin, The Queen of Spades; Borges, The Garden of Forking Paths; Achebe, Things Fall Apart.

Requirements & Grading: The participation requirements include: Careful reading of all texts, consistent attendance and active discussion in class and in the discussion section. Attendance will be taken regularly at the start of each class. Each student will be allowed three unexcused absences in the course of the semester. Any further absences will lower the student's grade by a half grade (i.e. a B becomes a B-, and a B- becomes a C+).

Three midterm examinations (25% each); Reading journal to be turned in periodically (15%); Attendance and class discussion (10%).

In order to pass the course all four assignments must be completed. Failure to complete any one of the assignments will constitute failing the course.

C L F315 • Masterworks Of Lit: World

82965 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CLA 1.104
(also listed as E F316K )
show description

Instructor:  Richmond-Garza, E            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  83510            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 315            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Global Literature and Culture --

What is a “self,” an individual? Is it a single entity or is it always entangled with others? Is it something created by history, by politics, by art, by culture, or by the divine? Or does it fashion itself? Does it change over time and across space? At some level, art is always concerned with making and unmaking the individual and with freeing or chaining this being. Tracking texts from Classical Greece, Palestine, and India to medieval Europe and the Middle East, we will focus on the continuing, and sometimes desperate, attempts of ancient and early modern artists and authors both to phrase and to answer this question. Expected names from the western canon, like Euripides, Shakespeare, and Baudelaire will keep company with Russia’s Pushkin, Argentina’s Borges, and Nigeria’s Achebe.

We shall not limit ourselves only to the western canon but will look at points of crisis where, whether because of gender, race, ideology or class, an individual’s voyage of discovery will demand answers and action. We shall trace a drama of self-actualization, more than two thousand years old, one that is still being enacted. From the extremities of the Greek stage to a lonely cry of agony in the Assyrian desert, from ideal Platonic love to its witty and non-dialectical Asian counterparts, from Parisian decadence to the painful experience of post-colonial Africa, from compulsive gambling to uncanny hauntings, from the dark voyages of Romantic self-discovery to imagined journeys through magical lands, we shall explore the limits of this question’s answers.

While the basis of the course will be the literary texts, we shall pillage often and importantly the resources of the other arts of painting, music, and film especially to conjure back to life the spirits of these past identities in preparation for a course in which we shall interrogate our own century as it emerges from the twilight of the twentieth-century experiment.

Texts: All readings will be posted on the course website, as will the multimedia supporting materials. Texts will include: Gilgamesh; Euripides, Medea; selections from Chuang Chou; Kalidasa, Sakuntala; selections from The Thousand and One Nights; Dante, from Inferno; Montaigne's "Of Cannibals;" Shakespeare, Hamlet; Baudelaire, from The Flowers of Evil; Pushkin, The Queen of Spades; Woolf, An Unwritten Novel; Borges, The Garden of Forking Paths; Achebe, Things Fall Apart.

Requirements & Grading: The participation requirements include: Careful reading of all texts, consistent attendance and active discussion in class and in the discussion section. Attendance will be taken regularly at the start of each class. Each student will be allowed three unexcused absences total (including both lecture and section) in the course of the semester. Any further absences will lower the student's grade by a half grade (i.e. a B becomes a B-, and a B- becomes a C+).

Two midterm examinations (35% and 40% each); Reading journal to be turned in periodically (15%); Attendance and class discussion (10%).

In order to pass the course all three assignments must be completed. Failure to complete any one of the assignments will constitute failing the course.

C L 315 • Masterworks Of Lit: World

33800-33845 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm FAC 21
(also listed as E 316K )
show description

Instructor:  Richmond-Garza, E            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35220-35265            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 315            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Global Literature and Culture -- What is a “self,” an individual?  Is it a single entity or is it always entangled with others? Is it something created by history, by politics, by art, by culture or by the divine? Or does it fashion itself? Does it change over time and across space? At some level, art is always concerned with making and unmaking the individual and with freeing or chaining this being. Tracking texts from Classical Greece, Palestine and India to medieval Europe and Japan, we will focus on the continuing, and sometimes desperate, attempts of ancient and early modern artists and authors both to phrase and to answer this question. Expected names from the western canon, like Euripedes, Shakespeare, Goethe and Baudelaire will keep company with Japan’s Bashô, Russia’s Pushkin, Argentina’s Borges and Nigeria’s Achebe.

We shall not limit ourselves only to the western canon but will look at points of crisis where, whether because of gender, race, ideology or class, an individual’s voyage of discovery will demand answers and action. We shall trace a drama of self-actualization, more than two thousand years old, one that is still being enacted. From the extremities of the Greek stage to a lonely cry of agony in the Assyrian desert, from ideal Platonic love to its witty and non-dialectical Asian counterparts, from a Parisian’s insomnia in 1900 to the painful experience of post-colonial Africa, from compulsive gambling to uncanny hauntings, from the dark voyages of Romantic self-discovery to imagined journeys through magical lands, we shall explore the limits of this question’s answers.

While the basis of the course will be the literary texts, we shall pillage often and importantly the resources of the other arts of painting, sculpture and film especially to conjure back to life the spirits of these past identities in preparation for a spring in which we shall interrogate our own century as it emerges from the twilight of the twentieth-century experiment.

Texts: All selections will be from The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces (Expanded Edition in One Volume, 1997), and will include: Gilgamesh; Euripedes, Medea; selections from Chuang Chou; Kalidasa, Sakuntala; selections from The Thousand and One Nights; Montaigne's "Of Cannibals;" Shakespeare, Hamlet; Basho, The Narrow Road to the Interior; Goethe, Faust; Baudelaire, from The Flowers of Evil; Pushkin, The Queen of Spades; Borges, The Garden of Forking Paths; Achebe, Things Fall Apart.

Requirements & Grading: The participation requirements include: Careful reading of all texts, consistent attendance and active discussion in class and in the discussion section. Attendance will be taken regularly at the start of each class. Each student will be allowed three unexcused absences in the course of the semester. Any further absences will lower the student's grade by a half grade (i.e. a B becomes a B-, and a B- becomes a C+).

Three midterm examinations (25% each); Reading journal to be turned in periodically (15%); Attendance and class discussion (10%).

In order to pass the course all four assignments must be completed. Failure to complete any one of the assignments will constitute failing the course.

C L 323 • Contemporary Drama

33855 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 430pm-600pm PAR 206
(also listed as E 379L, REE 325 )
show description

Instructor:  Richmond-Garza, E            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35705            Flags:  Global cultures; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 323; REE 325            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: “There are two impulses in theatre: to be frivolous or to make rules.” -- Tadashi Suzuki

Despite our current tendency towards virtual modes of communication and entertainment, theatrical practices thrive as theatres around the world engage our moment and connect with each other. The aim of this course will be two-fold: to give an overview of the rich textuality and performance potential of contemporary drama, especially in Europe, and to situate its production within the context of the politics and aesthetics of the last half century. The course tracks innovations in dramatic practice globally since the 1950s. We will focus on European avant-garde theatre, particularly on (post)-colonialism, the end of the Cold War, and U.S. multiculturalism. Our playbill will include texts from Britain, France, Germany, and Russia. Additionally the syllabus will include complementary plays from the United States, India, Africa, and Latin America, which address the issues raised by the European plays.

The course will focus on the works of playwrights who dare to make theatre after the end of the Second World War, the end of the European empires, the Vietnam War, and the great changes in culture and ideology of the last thirty years. Each of the major playwrights we will read inherits a challenge from the great British dramatic tradition and from the impact of the European avant-garde, whose imperatives each of them either continues or disrupts. We will begin in the 1950s pairing John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger with Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Beckett and Pinter’s later works deconstruct the modern subject while questioning a confident European political or artistic order. The remainder of the class will examine the development of, and resistance to, a radically left-wing and anti-realist/anti-naturalist theatre in Britain, the United States, and in post-colonial environments.

Texts: Primary dramatic texts will include: Reza’s Art, Stoppard’s Rock and Roll, Hwang’s M. Butterfly, Fugard’s Bloodknot, Valdez’s Zoot Suit, Kushner’s Angels in America, Mamet’s Oleanna, Devlin’s After Easter, and Smith’s Fires in the Mirror. Additionally we will read secondary materials on historical context and on shifts in dramatic styles from practitioners and critics. These will be supplemented by performance-related materials drawn from music, the visual arts, acting theory, and history. Filmed versions of the plays will be used where possible.

Requirements & Grading: The grade for the course will be based upon several written assignments, as well as a 15-minute oral report, together with one or two other members of the class (10%). All written assignments may be rewritten any time prior to the due date of the next written assignment. Grades for the rewrites will be averaged with the grade assigned to the original draft submitted. The written requirements for the class, for which detailed instructions will be provided later, include the following: a book of “Director’s Notes” (one 100-word entry for each reading assignment). The entries will be collected in two halves. (5% + 5%), a short assignment which considers a single play (5 pages, 20%), a brief research report and commentary (2 pages, 5%), a formal prospectus (100 words, 5%), a longer research essay (10 pages, 35%), a third assignment (3 pages, 15%).

C L 323 • Twentieth-Century Drama

33715 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 310
(also listed as E 369, REE 325 )
show description

Instructor:  Richmond-Garza, E            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35610            Flags:  Global cultures, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 323; REE 325            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Art in the theater is a ripening, an evolution, an uplifting which enables us to emerge from darkness into a blaze of light.

            (Jerzy Grotowski, “Statement of Principles,” Towards a Poor Theater)

Drama is necessarily public and commercial, paid for and solicited by bourgeois patrons and therefore interacts dynamically with culture and society. The aim of this course will be two-fold: to give an acceptable overview of the rich textuality and performance potential of modern European Drama and to situate its production within the context of the politics and aesthetics of world literature more generally.

The course will focus on the work of six playwrights: Ibsen, Chekhov, Wilde, Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett, and Pinter. Each of these major playwrights will be paired with other playwrights whose work either continues or disrupts his imperatives. We will begin by looking at the great theatrical explosion of the turn of the century in Ibsen and Chekhov, who will be read, along with Wilde and Shaw, in the context of fin-de-siècle aesthetics and politics. We will then trace the development in the 1920s and 1930s of absurdist theatre in the plays of Pirandello, who will be paired with Ionesco, and of “epic” and political theatre in Brecht, who will be read together with Italian Futurism. A selection from Beckett’s plays will be read in the contexts of the two World Wars and the deconstruction of a confident European political or artistic order. The canon will be completed with Ionesco’s and Pinter’s plays and a selection of recent radical political plays, including those of Genet, Soyinka, Puig, Petrushevskaya, and Fugard, that reflects the creation and dissolution of the European empires in Latin America and Africa especially.

Much of the excitement of looking at theatrical texts derives from their multi-mediality, and we shall pillage the UT and on-line resources for performance material and footage. No previous familiarity with drama is expected or even solicited, and I will provide those introductions to theatre and performance theory that I think might be provocative.

Requirements & Grading: 1. Attendance of all class meetings and a 15-minutews oral report. (10%); 2. A book of “Director’s Notes” collected in two halves. (5% + 5%); 3. A short assignment which considers a single play (5 pages). (20%); 4. A research report and commentary (2 pages). (5%); 5. A formal prospectus (100 words). (5%); 6. A longer research essay, on a topic of the student’s choice. (10 pages) (35%); 7. A third assignment (3 pages) (15%).

C L 382 • World Lit/Globalism: Thry/Prac

33760 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 200
show description

“World Literature and Globalism: Theory and Practice”

§ Description:

This course combines practical considerations of curriculum design and classroom practice with a crucial topic in contemporary comparative literary theory.  That degree programs, at both the undergraduate and the graduate level, in whichever modern languages and area studies concentrations need to address a diasporic and global definition of literature is a given of the geopolitical and cultural contexts and the academic concerns of the twenty-first century.  That comparatists are distinctively equipped to undertake this daunting project is manifest, given the discipline’s tradition of methodologically self-conscious interlinguistic study. Both of these arguments define the debate on the place and role of language and literature studies within today’s universities solidly in comparative literary terms.  Programs in Comparative Literature are being invited to embrace this challenge and to address the need for interlinguistic and interdisciplinary courses of study.  Of course, such courses will always exceed the possible expertise of any single instructor, but there is a curricular graduate solution to the underlying quandary of occidental methodology and world primary textuality.Drawing on the contemporary debate about “World literature” undergraduate courses and over the “canon” of literary theory, this course will assess both the challenge and the potential of teaching a boldly interdisciplinary world curriculum, which includes not only ethnic and third world literature and literatures from widely varied language groups.  In addition to questions of translation and contextualization, we will be attentive to the theoretical underpinnings by which western literary theory inflects and defines curricular and critical choices even in a world literary context.  Is it enough to undertake a conscientious array of “primary” texts or are there methodologies embedded in our very notion of literature, poetics, representation which need to be examined, adjusted, hybridized even for an undergraduate curriculum?  Should the teaching world literature at the undergraduate level involve a rethinking at the theoretical level so as to bridge the gap between on occidental methodology and a “world” content in the classroom?  What role does technology in the classroom play?  Practical examples of such curricular adaptations will be suggested based on the curricula of UT’s 316K/CL 315, “Masterworks of Literature: World.”  This course should be of interest to graduate students in literature interested in translation, globalism, interdisciplinarity, multi-media approaches to teaching, and pedagogy.

§ Texts:

Readings in several world literature anthologies, including Norton, Longman, and Bedford; critical texts from nineteenth century texts such as Shelley’s Defense and Goethe’s essay on Weltliteratur to Damrosch’s What is World Literature, including modern commentaries by critics such as Basnett, Benjamin, Bloom, Guillory, Lawall, Lefevere, Saussy, Venuti, as well as essays on specific regional and ethnic contexts.

§ Requirements:

The goal of this course is to be as tailored as possible to the individual interests and needs of the students enrolled.

• The “written” requirements, therefore, are entirely flexible and range from the composition of a conventional  20-page seminar paper on a topic of the student’s choosing, to the designing of a syllabus, to a series of shorter response essays about the readings, to the design of course materials for on-line environments etc.  Each student will design and submit for approval a project of “written” work.  The last two days of class will be devoted to presentations of that work in a mini-conference format.  Additionally each student will answer the two short practica.  These will form the basis of our seminar discussions for two class meetings.

• In addition to conscientious attendance and vigorous and collegial participation in class discussions, each student will also present a 20-minute oral report on a topic related to the day to initiate our discussion at one of the seminar meetings.

C L F315 • Masterworks Of Lit: World

83180 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am WEL 3.502
(also listed as E F316K )
show description

Instructor:  Richmond-Garza, E            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  83610            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Summer 2012, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 315            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Global Literature and Culture --

What is a “self,” an individual? Is it a single entity or is it always entangled with others? Is it something created by history, by politics, by art, by culture, or by the divine? Or does it fashion itself? Does it change over time and across space? At some level, art is always concerned with making and unmaking the individual and with freeing or chaining this being. Tracking texts from Classical Greece, Palestine, and India to medieval Europe and the Middle East, we will focus on the continuing, and sometimes desperate, attempts of ancient and early modern artists and authors both to phrase and to answer this question. Expected names from the western canon, like Euripedes, Shakespeare, and Baudelaire will keep company with Russia’s Pushkin, Argentina’s Borges, and Nigeria’s Achebe.

We shall not limit ourselves only to the western canon but will look at points of crisis where, whether because of gender, race, ideology or class, an individual’s voyage of discovery will demand answers and action. We shall trace a drama of self-actualization, more than two thousand years old, one that is still being enacted. From the extremities of the Greek stage to a lonely cry of agony in the Assyrian desert, from ideal Platonic love to its witty and non-dialectical Asian counterparts, from Parisian decadence to the painful experience of post-colonial Africa, from compulsive gambling to uncanny hauntings, from the dark voyages of Romantic self-discovery to imagined journeys through magical lands, we shall explore the limits of this question’s answers.

While the basis of the course will be the literary texts, we shall pillage often and importantly the resources of the other arts of painting, music, and film especially to conjure back to life the spirits of these past identities in preparation for a course in which we shall interrogate our own century as it emerges from the twilight of the twentieth-century experiment.

Texts: All readings will be posted on the course website, as will the multimedia supporting materials. Texts will include: Gilgamesh; Euripedes, Medea; selections from Chuang Chou; Kalidasa, Sakuntala; selections from The Thousand and One Nights; Dante, from Inferno; Montaigne's "Of Cannibals;" Shakespeare, Hamlet; Baudelaire, from The Flowers of Evil; Pushkin, The Queen of Spades; Woolf, An Unwritten Novel; Borges, The Garden of Forking Paths; Achebe, Things Fall Apart.

Requirements & Grading: The participation requirements include: Careful reading of all texts, consistent attendance and active discussion in class and in the discussion section. Attendance will be taken regularly at the start of each class. Each student will be allowed three unexcused absences total (including both lecture and section) in the course of the semester. Any further absences will lower the student's grade by a half grade (i.e. a B becomes a B-, and a B- becomes a C+).

Two midterm examinations (35% and 40% each); Reading journal to be turned in periodically (15%); Attendance and class discussion (10%).

In order to pass the course all three assignments must be completed. Failure to complete any one of the assignments will constitute failing the course.

C L 323 • Twentieth-Century Drama

33770 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 308
(also listed as E 369, REE 325 )
show description

Instructor:  Richmond-Garza, E            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35430            Flags:  Global cultures, Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 323; REE 325            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Art in the theater is a ripening, an evolution, an uplifting which enables us to emerge from darkness into a blaze of light.

            (Jerzy Grotowski, “Statement of Principles,” Towards a Poor Theater)

Drama is necessarily public and commercial, paid for and solicited by bourgeois patrons and therefore interacts dynamically with culture and society. The aim of this course will be two-fold: to give an acceptable overview of the rich textuality and performance potential of modern European Drama and to situate its production within the context of the politics and aesthetics of world literature more generally.

The course will focus on the work of six playwrights: Ibsen, Chekhov, Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett, and Pinter. Each of these major playwrights will be paired with other playwrights whose work either continues or disrupts his imperatives. We will begin by looking at the great theatrical explosion of the turn of the century in Ibsen and Chekhov, who will be read, along with Wilde and Shaw, in the context of fin-de-siècle aesthetics and politics. We will then trace the development in the 1920s and 1930s of absurdist theatre in the plays of Pirandello, who will be paired with Ionesco, and of “epic” and political theatre in Brecht, who will be read together with Bulgakov. A selection from Beckett’s plays will be read in the contexts of the two World Wars and the deconstruction of a confident European political or artistic order. The canon will be completed with Ionesco’s and Pinter’s plays, Artaud and a selection of recent radical political plays, including those of Genet, Soyinka, Petrushevskaya, and Fugard, that reflects the creation and dissolution of the European empires in Latin America and Africa especially.

Much of the excitement of looking at theatrical texts derives from their multi-mediality, and we shall pillage the UT and on-line resources for performance material and footage. No previous familiarity with drama is expected or even solicited, and I will provide those introductions to theatre and performance theory that I think might be provocative. 

Requirements & Grading: 1. Attendance of all class meetings and a 15-minutews oral report. (10%); 2. A book of “Director’s Notes” collected in two halves. (5% + 5%); 3. A short assignment which considers a single play (5 pages). (20%); 4. A research report and commentary (2 pages). (5%); 5. A formal prospectus (100 words). (5%); 6. A longer research essay, on a topic of the student’s choice. (10 pages) (35%); 7. A third assignment (3 pages) (15%).

C L 381 • Staging The Long 19th Century

33640 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 210
(also listed as E 392M, REE 385 )
show description

Staging the Long Nineteenth Century: From the Terror to the Trenches

Eric Hobsbawm invites us to the see the 19th century as bracketed not be the years 1800 and 1900, but rather by the French Revolution and the outbreak of the First World War.  This bold framing invites us to consider the spectacles of the period, both political/military and artistic.  The visual arts, painting and theatre in particular form one of the most dynamic and provocative introductions to the period and continue to inform our views on how to perform history today.  The course will track European theatrical responses to the political events that begin with 1789 and the development of Romantic drama in France, Russia, Germany and Britain through to the last expressions of the 19th century in the moments before Sarajevo.  There will be a focus on the roles of politics and history in shaping the content of the plays and on the dramatic philosophical and aesthetics innovations especially the Kantkrise, the development of Naturalism and Realism in the 1870s, and the turn towards Aestheticism and Symbolism in the 1880s and 1890s.  The course will begin with the encounter with the Shakespearean legacy as a shared literary patrimony that forms/frames the development of Romantic drama.   In the aftermath of the Napoleonic, wars, we will turn to a consideration of historical works such as Goethe’s Faust Part 1, Schiller’s Maria Stuart, Kleist’s Penthesilea, and Büchner’s Danton’s Death.  The German texts precede the critique of texts such as Byron’s Manfred, Shelley’s The Cenci, Hugo’s Hernani, Pushkin’s Boris Godunov, and Lermontov’s Masquerade.  Our view of the later 19th century will grounded in operatic innovations by Weber, Wagner, Mussorgsky and Berg in particular, whose works will be paired with melodramas by Boucicault (The Octoroon), Pinero (The Second Mrs. Tanqueray) and Lewis (The Bells).  The course will conclude with a focus on taking stock of the century as the First World War approaches and anticipating Modernism in Wilde’s An Ideal Husband, Shaw’s Heartbreak House, and Chekhov’s The Seagull.  Each text will be paired with appropriate period theoretical readings.  Particular focus will be placed on the rise of imperialism and to period debates about gender, race, sexuality and the nature of the human in a dynamic, fraught and expanding global consciousness.  Painting and music will also be included as part of the full consideration of the plays’ performative actualities.  The course should be of interest to students of the long 19th c., European drama, and philosophical approaches to literature/aesthetic theory in particular.

Students will be expected to prepare a 15-minute oral report on materials related to the course and to their individual research projects.  They will also be expected to write a research paper or to propose an appropriate alternative assignment.  All texts, with the exception of the Shakespearean ones for which any edition may be used, will be provided in a reader and/or posted on Blackboard in English.  Original languages versions of the texts will be available upon request.  The operatic, musical, and fine arts materials will all be made available through Blackboard as well.

C L 385 • Theories Of Literary Criticism

34040 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 0.120
show description

Course Description

This course will aim to provide a reasonably representative introduction to literary theory from Socratic texts through Augustine’s important contributions into the late nineteenth century.  Throughout the course we shall have a double emphasis:  grappling with the original historical goals of these works and detecting the way in which the problems they address continue to define the terms of modern theoretical debates so as to remain pressing today.  Particular attention will be paid both to the Platonic attack upon poetry and rhetoric, particularly in the course of his remarks about tragedy, and to Aristotle’s complex and multiple responses.  The Roman revisers of the Greek inheritance will be viewed as a first reception, to be followed by several examples drawn from the Renaissance and from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  The later texts will draw out implications from the classical material of India, Japan, Greece and the Hebrew tradition in ways which inflect the material for particular aesthetic and ideological purposes.  We shall be especially interested in the flurry of theoretical activity throughout the nineteenth century as the aesthetic and philosophical apparatus attempts to cope with the very real implications of the century: industrialism, empire, the decline of metaphysics, etc.  A final gesture will be made towards the implications of this historical trajectory for the twentieth century.

 

Readings

Required Texts:

Hazard Adams, Critical Theory Since Plato (HBJ, 1992)

Reader, available from Speedway, Dobie Mall, 2nd Level (469-5653)

 

All texts will be available in the original languages as well as in suitable English translations.  Students are encouraged to read texts in the original where possible. Selections will be drawn primarily from Hazard Adams, Critical Theory Since Plato with additional texts such as selections from the Natyasastra; Midrash, Tacitus, Dialogus, Giraldi Cinthio, Internal Discourse; Du Bellay, Defense and Illustration; Diderot, Rameau’s Nephew; Schiller, Naïve and Sentimental Poetry; Kleist, “On the Marionette Theater;” Shleiermacher, “1819 Lectures on Hermeneutics;” Derrida, Dissemination; Baudrillard, Simlulations.

C L 323 • Twentieth-Century Drama

32945 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 103
(also listed as E 369, REE 325 )
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Drama is necessarily public and commercial, paid for and solicited by bourgeois patrons and therefore interacts dynamically with culture and society.  The aim of this course will be two-fold: to give an acceptable overview of the rich textuality and performance potential of modern European Drama and to situate its production within the context of the politics and aesthetics of world literature more generally.

The course will focus on the work of six playwrights:  Ibsen, Chekhov, Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett, and Pinter.  Each of these major playwrights will be paired with another playwright whose work either continues or disrupts his imperatives.  We will begin by looking at the great theatrical explosion of the turn of the century in Ibsen and Chekhov, who will be read, along with Wilde and Shaw, in the context of fin-de-siêcle aesthetics and politics.  We will then trace the development in the 1920s and 1930s of absurdist theatre in the plays of Pirandello, who will be paired with Ionesco, and of "epic" and political theatre in Brecht, who will be read together with Bulgakov.  A selection of Beckett's plays will be read in the contexts of the two World Wars and the deconstruction of a confident European political or artistic order.  The canon will be completed with Beckett's and Pinter's plays and at a selection of recent radical political plays, including Genet, Soyinka, and Fugard, that reflect the creation and dissolution of the European empires in India and Africa especially.

 

Texts

See Above

Requirements and Grading

 

Attendance of all class meetings and a brief oral report 15%

Two short essays (5 pages each) 25%+25%

One eight-page essay 35%

 

 

Prerequisite

Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.  No exceptions.

C L 323 • Twentieth-Century Drama-W

33295 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 101
(also listed as E 369, REE 325 )
show description

 

English 369 (34955), CL 323 (33295),                  Dr. E. M. Richmond-Garza
     and REE 325 (45505)                                     Parlin 119, 232-5708
     Tu Th 12:30-2, Parlin 101                               Office Hours:  Tu Th 11-12:30
                                                                                       and by appointment
                                                                         emrg@mail.utexas.edu

Twentieth Century Drama
Spring 2010

     Art in the theater is a ripening, an evolution, an uplifting which enables us to emerge from darkness into a blaze of light.
                  (Jerzy Grotowski, “Statement of Principles,” Towards a Poor Theater)

Intent of the Course:

Drama is necessarily public and commercial, paid for and solicited by bourgeois patrons and therefore interacts dynamically with culture and society. The aim of this course will be two-fold: to give an acceptable overview of the rich textuality and performance potential of modern European Drama and to situate its production within the context of the politics and aesthetics of world literature more generally.

The course will focus on the work of six playwrights: Ibsen, Chekhov, Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett, and Pinter. Each of these major playwrights will be paired with other playwrights whose work either continues or disrupts his imperatives. We will begin by looking at the great theatrical explosion of the turn of the century in Ibsen and Chekhov, who will be read, along with Wilde and Shaw, in the context of fin-de-siècle aesthetics and politics. We will then trace the development in the 1920s and 1930s of absurdist theatre in the plays of Pirandello, who will be paired with Ionesco, and of “epic” and political theatre in Brecht, who will be read together with Bulgakov. A selection of Beckett’s plays will be read in the contexts of the two World Wars and the deconstruction of a confident European political or artistic order. The canon will be completed with Ionesco’s and Pinter’s plays, Artaud and a selection of recent radical political plays, including those of Genet, Soyinka, Petrushevskaya, and Fugard, that reflects the creation and dissolution of the European empires in Latin America and Africa especially.

Much of the excitement of looking at theatrical texts derives from their multi-mediality, and we shall pillage the UT and on-line resources for performance material and footage. No previous familiarity with drama is expected or even solicited, and I will provide those introductions to theatre and performance theory that I think might be provocative.

Texts

The following texts are required for the course:

  • Reader, available from Speedway, Dobie Mall, Lower Level (478-3334)
  • Walter Levy, ed., Modern Drama: 1879-Present, available at the Coop

Most musical pieces, paintings and films are all available online or from local movie rental stores. In addition:

  • Most films are “On Reserve” in the Audio-Visual Library (FAC 340, 495-4467).
  • Most music is “On Reserve” at the Fine Arts Library (FAB 3.200, 495-4480).

 Policy Statement

1. The oral, attendance, and participation requirements for the class include the following:

  • § Attendance of the class meetings is required, and participation and questions are encouraged.  Active class participation may assist in improving the student’s final grade in borderline cases.  Students who do not participate in class discussions should expect to receive as their grade for the course as a whole the grade that they have earned for the written work.  Attendance will be taken regularly at the start of each class.  Each student will be allowed three unexcused absences in the course of the semester.  Any further absences will lower the student’s grade by a half grade (i.e. a B becomes a B-, and a B- becomes a C+).  Tardiness counts as absence.  Any special circumstances or additional absences must be discussed with the instructor and approved in advance of the days to be missed.
  • § Students are expected to come to class prepared.  Careful reading of all assigned texts and viewing of all films are required for the day on which they are assigned. The written texts, films, and multi-media-materials together form the content of the course.  Students are expected to have done the required work and to come to class with comments and questions about the material.
  • § Students are expected to behave in a collegial and polite manner during class.  Texting, answering email, talking outside the class discussion, or in any way being disruptive of the sessions or disrespectful to other students is not permitted.  Students who do not pay attention in class will be asked to leave class and will be counted absent for the day.
  • § Each student will give a 15-minute oral report, together with one or two other members of the class.  At least 24 hours in advance of each report, the presenters for that day will post three questions for the class on Blackboard and will prepare a handout and/or .ppt presentation for the class. (10%)

2. The written requirements for the class, for which detailed instructions will be provided later, include the following (All assignments may be rewritten any time prior to the due date of the next written assignment.  Grades for the rewrites will be averaged with the grade assigned to the original draft submitted.):

  • § A book of “Director’s Notes” (one 100-word entry for each reading assignment).  These notes will be completed while doing the assigned readings and should not be based on class discussion.  Their goal is two-fold:  1) to demonstrate that the student has done the reading carefully and on time; 2) to share individual responses to the texts in a less formal environment.  The entries will be collected in two halves.  Due on 4 March and 4 May (5% + 5%)
  • § A short assignment which considers a single play (5 pages).  For the first short essay a topic will be suggested, although any topic that has been approved by the instructor in advance of submission will be encouraged and accepted.  Due on 16 February(20%)
  • §A research report and commentary (2 pages), on Internet and library resources for a topic of the student’s choice in preparation for the writing of the research paper.  Due on 2 March.  (5%).
  • § A formal prospectus (100 words), which describes the area of focus and initial ideas for the research paper.  This prospectus must be submitted to the instructor for approval.  Due  on 13 April. (5%)
  • § A longer research essay (10 pages), on a topic of the student’s choice.  Due on 22 April(35%)
  • § A third assignment (3 pages), which may involve creative writing, performance or a collaboration between students, or may be a short essay.  Due on 6 May, (15%)

All work is expected to be the student’s own and is governed by UT’s policy on academic honesty:

         http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/academicintegrity.html

The final grade for the course will be cumulative and based upon the percentages indicated.  There will be no final examination.  In order to pass the course all four assignments must be completed.  Failure to complete any one of the assignments will constitute failing the course.  All special circumstances must be discussed with the instructor in advance of the due date.

Any assignments submitted late will be held to a higher standard, because the student has had the unfair advantage of more time to prepare, and will be marked more severely as a result.  The written assignments will be graded for form and style as well as content.  No assignments will be accepted after 5 PM on Friday the 7th of May.

Students with Disabilities

The U. S. Federal Government defines someone with disabilities as “any person who (i) has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities [and] (ii) has a record of such impairment.  University regulations stipulate that students with disabilities may seek “reasonable accommodations,” but they “must first register with Services for Students with Disabilities [,] provide appropriate documentation regarding [their] disability, [and] meet instructor expectations concerning attendance, class participation, performance and work standards.”

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

C L 385 • Theories Of Literary Criticism

33330 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 0.120
show description

Course Description

This course will aim to provide a reasonably representative introduction to literary theory from Socratic texts through Augustine’s important contributions into the late nineteenth century.  Throughout the course we shall have a double emphasis:  grappling with the original historical goals of these works and detecting the way in which the problems they address continue to define the terms of modern theoretical debates so as to remain pressing today.  Particular attention will be paid both to the Platonic attack upon poetry and rhetoric, particularly in the course of his remarks about tragedy, and to Aristotle’s complex and multiple responses.  The Roman revisers of the Greek inheritance will be viewed as a first reception, to be followed by several examples drawn from the Renaissance and from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  The later texts will draw out implications from the classical material of India, Japan, Greece and the Hebrew tradition in ways which inflect the material for particular aesthetic and ideological purposes.  We shall be especially interested in the flurry of theoretical activity throughout the nineteenth century as the aesthetic and philosophical apparatus attempts to cope with the very real implications of the century: industrialism, empire, the decline of metaphysics, etc.  A final gesture will be made towards the implications of this historical trajectory for the twentieth century.

 

Readings

Required Texts:

Hazard Adams, Critical Theory Since Plato (HBJ, 1992)

Reader, available from Speedway, Dobie Mall, 2nd Level (469-5653)

 

All texts will be available in the original languages as well as in suitable English translations.  Students are encouraged to read texts in the original where possible. Selections will be drawn primarily from Hazard Adams, Critical Theory Since Plato with additional texts such as selections from the Natyasastra; Midrash, Tacitus, Dialogus, Giraldi Cinthio, Internal Discourse; Du Bellay, Defense and Illustration; Diderot, Rameau’s Nephew; Schiller, Naïve and Sentimental Poetry; Kleist, “On the Marionette Theater;” Shleiermacher, “1819 Lectures on Hermeneutics;” Derrida, Dissemination; Baudrillard, Simlulations.

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