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Dr. Elizabeth Richmond-Garza, Director 208 W. 21st St. Stop B5003, Austin, Tx 78712 • 512-471-1925

Thomas Garza

Associate Professor Ed.D., Harvard University, 1987

University Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies
Thomas Garza

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-3607
  • Office: BUR 458 and HRH 4.190
  • Office Hours: Tuesday 10:00-12:00, Wednesday 2:00-4:00 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: F3600

Biography

Thomas Jesús Garza is University Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies, Director of the Texas Language Center, and the Executive Director of Partners for Languages in the U.S., a national membership organization for standards-based accreditation of language programs. He is also Affiliated Faculty in the Program in Comparative Litearture and the Center for Mexican-American Studies.

He teaches Russian language and literature at all levels, foreign language pedagogy, and courses in contemporary Russian culture.  He has been traveling to and researching in Russia since 1979 and has lived in Moscow for over five years.  A native Texan, Dr. Garza received his doctorate from Harvard University in 1987.

During his twenty five-year tenure at the University, he has received numerous prizes for undergraduate and graduate teaching, including the Texas Excellence Award, the President's Associates Award, the Harry Ransom Award, was inducted into the University Academy of Distinguished Teachers in 2003, and selected for a Regents Outstanding Teaching Award in 2009.

His current research is on intensive language teaching methods, and cultural portraits of machismo in contemporary Russian and Latino cultures.

 

C L 323 • Bulgakov's Master/Margarita

34330 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 130
(also listed as REE 325, RUS 360 )
show description

Stalin's Moscow, 1936. The Devil and his gang have come to the mortal world to determine how Mankind is faring in the 20th century.  He encounters a motley crew of Soviet bureaucrats, writers, politicians and artists who offer little hope for the future.  Enter the "Master", an unknown writer struggling to finish a novel about the life of Christ told from the perspective of Pontius Pilate.  Can one writer and his work be reason enough to prevent the apocalypse? Enter Margarita, the Master's selfless companion and heroine of Mikhail Bulgakov's masterpiece, The Master and Margarita. Regarded by many readers and critics as one of the greatest novels of our time, The Master and Margarita is a fixed part of Russian culture. This course will explore not only the intricacies of the novel itself, but also its place among Bulgakov’s other literary works, and its varied sources from world literature, music and the visual arts. More importantly, it reveals the brilliance and complexities of art created under a strict totalitarian regime. This course will examine -- within the Stalin-era Soviet context -- the texts and philosophies that significantly influenced Bulgakov in the creation of his novel.  You will examine these various texts (philosophical treatises, stories, folklore, plays, paintings, operas, and films) and discover the ways that they influenced the shape of the novel and how they appear within the dual story lines and the numerous characters. Ultimately, the course will allow you to reexamine your own philosophy of Good and Evil in the 21st century.

Readings:

The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov, Burgin & O’Connor, trans. New York: Vintage Books, 1995.

Faust, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, New York: Norton & Co., 2001.

The Divine Comedy, DanteAlighieri, New York: Everymans, 1995.

• Packet of readings

Grading requirements:

The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov, Burgin & O’Connor, trans. New York: Vintage Books, 1995.

Faust, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, New York: Norton & Co., 2001.

The Divine Comedy, DanteAlighieri, New York: Everymans, 1995.

• Packet of readings

Course prerequisite: Upper division standing.

C L 305 • Vampire In Slavic Cultures

33920 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CMA 2.306
(also listed as EUS 307, REE 302, SLA 301 )
show description

Eight hundred years before Bram Stoker gave us the West's most memorable vampire in Dracula (1897) and long before the exploits of Vlad "the Impaler" Tepes horrified Europe (1431-46), the Russian Primary Chronicles write of a Novgorodian priest as Upyr' Likhij, or Wicked Vampire (1047).  The Slavic and Balkan worlds abound in histories, legends, myths and literary portraits of the so-called undead, creatures that literally draw life out of the living. This course examines the vampire in the cultures of Russia and Eastern Europe, including manifestations in literature, religion, art, film and common practices from its origins to 2013.  Texts – both print and non-print media – will be drawn from Russian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Serbian and Croatian sources.  Participants will be asked to separate historical fact from popular fiction, and form opinions about the place of the vampire in Slavic and East European cultures. 

Prerequisites:  The course is conducted in English.  No knowledge of Russian required, though readings in Russian and other Slavic languages are available for majors and concentrators in these related fields.

Readings:   • The Vampire in Slavic Culture, Course Reader (CR), T. J. Garza, ed., Cognella Press, San Diego: CA, 2010. [order online]

The Vampire: A Casebook, Alan Dundes, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1998.

[at the UT Co-op]

Grading:         

Short essay I (3-4 pp.)          25%                            

Midterm exam I                    25%

Short essay II (3-4 pp.)         25%                            

Midterm exam II                  25%

C L 323 • Russian Fairy Tales

33895 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 500pm-630pm MEZ 1.306
(also listed as REE 325, SLA 324 )
show description

 This course will consider the development of the Russian fairy tale and its adaptations of the tales of Perrault, Grimm, and other European writers, leading to the creation of the Russian literary fairy tales of Pushkin, Zhukovsky and Ostrovsky in the 19th century.  Also, contemporary filmic portraits of the tales from classical Russian productions to Disney and Cocteau will be examined as the heir to the original fairy tale genre.  Students will be familiarized with four critical methodologies used in the study of folk and fairy tales: Structuralist (Jakobson, Propp), Feminist (Warner, Lieberman), Psychological (Bettelheim, Freud), and Sociological (Zipes, Lüthi).  We will apply various of these methodologies to the texts – tales, films and prints – that we examine.

Texts:

Required Texts:

Russian Folk Belief.  Linda J. Ivanits, Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1992.

Russian Fairy Tales,  A. Afanas'ev, New York: Pantheon Books, 1974.

The Uses of Enchantment, Bruno Bettelheim, ed.  New York: Random House/Vintage, 1977.

• Packet of readings available at Speedway Printers in Dobie Mall

            Recommended Texts:

The Morphology of the Folktale, Vladimir Propp, Austin: University of Texas Press, 1975.

Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion, Jack Zipes, New York: Methuen Press, 1983.

Once Upon a Time: On the Nature of Fairy Tales, Max Lüthi, Bloomington: Indiana U P, 1976.

Requirements and Grading

            Reaction paper (5 pp.)                                           20%

                        Midterm exam I                                        25%

                        Short critical essay (5-7 pp.)                       20%

                        Midterm exam II                                       25%

                        Participation                                              10%

C L 323 • Bad Lang: Race, Class, Gender

33715 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 100
(also listed as AMS 321, LIN 350, MAS 374, REE 325, RUS 369, WGS 340 )
show description

Course Description

 

Maledicta: (Latin. n., pl. maledictum, sg.), curse words, insults; profane language of all kinds.

When is a word “bad”? Why can one person use a “bad” word with impunity, and another cannot? What marks such usage as acceptable or not?  How do race, socioeconomic class, and gender play into the use of “bad” language in the US? This course undertakes the examination of modern usage of language that has been designated as “bad” through social convention. Usage of forms of obscenities and profanity in popular usage will be examined in an attempt to come to an understanding of how the products of US popular culture portray maledicta in situational contexts. Through an examination of various texts culled from print, film, and music, participants will study the context and use of “bad” language and attempt to determine the underlying principles that dictate its affect and determine its impact on the audience. Though the majority of texts and usage will be taken from English-language sources, several non-English examples of maledicta from Mexican Spanish and Russian will also be examined for contrast and comparison.

 

NB: This course examines texts that contain usage of obscenities, profanity, and offensive language. Students who do not wish to be exposed to such language in use should not sign up for this course.

 

Texts:

• Bad Language: Are Some Words Better than Others? Edwin Battistella.

Oxford UP, 2007.

• Expletive Deleted: A Good Look at Bad Language. Ruth Wajnryb. Free press,

2005.

• Course packet

 

Requirements and Grading

• Exams (two midterms):             30%

• Film review:                            20%

• Reading journal:                        20%

• Research paper:                        30%

C L 305 • Vampire In Slavic Cultures

33545 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 100
(also listed as EUS 307, REE 302, SLA 301 )
show description

Description

Eight hundred years before Bram Stoker gave us the West's most memorable vampire in his novel Dracula and long before the exploits of Vlad "the Impaler" Tepes horrified Europe, the Russian Primary Chronicles tell of a Novgorodian prince as Upyr' Lichyj, or Wicked Vampire.  The Slavic and Balkan worlds abound in histories, legends, myths and literary portraits of the so-called un-dead, creatures which draw life out of the living.

This course examines the vampire in the history and cultures of Russia, the Balkans and Central and Eastern Europe, including manifestations in literature, religion, art, film and common practices.  Texts – both print and non-print media, both Slavic and non-Slavic – will be drawn from Russian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Romany, Serbian and Croatian sources.  Participants will be asked to separate historical fact from popular fiction (where possible!), and form opinions about the place and importance of the vampire in Slavic and other Central European cultures. 

The course is conducted in English.  No knowledge of Russian required, though readings in Russian and other Slavic languages are available for majors and concentrators in the field.

Texts

 The Darkling: A Treatise on Slavic Vampirism.  Jan L. Perkowski, Columbus, OH: Slavica Publishers, 1989. [photocopy]

 The Vampire Casebook, Alan Dundes, Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1998.

 Packet of readings

Recommended Text

Blood Read: The Vampire as Metaphor in Contemporary Culture, Joan Gordon and

Veronica Hollinger, eds., Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press,  1997.

Requirements and grading

Short essay I (5 pp.)                            20%

Midterm exam                                      20%

Short essay II (5 pp.)                            20%

Text journal                                          20%

Final exam                                            20%

C L 323 • Bulgakov's Master & Margarita

32895 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 2.124
(also listed as REE 385, RUS 360 )
show description

Course Description

Stalin’s Moscow, 1936, The Devil and his gang have come to the mortal world to determine how Mankind is faring in the 20th century.  He encounters a motley crew of Soviet bureaucrats, writers, politicians and arts who offer little hope for the future.  Enter the “Master”, an unknown writer struggling to finish a novel about the life of Christ told from the perspective of Pontius Pilate.  Can one writer and his work be reason enough to prevent the apocalypse? Enter Margarita, the Master’s selfless companion and heroine of Mikhail Bulgakov’s masterpiece, The Master and Margarita.  Regarded by many readers and critics as one of the greatest novels of our time, The Master and Margarita is a fixed part of Russian culture.  This course will explore not only the intricacies of the novel itself, but also its place among Bulgakov’s other literary works, and its varied sources from world literature, music and the visual arts.  More importantly, it reveals the brilliance and complexities of art created under a strict totalitarian regime.  This course will examine—within the Stalin-era Soviet context—the texts and philosophies that significantly influenced Bulgakov in the creation of his novel.  You will examine these various texts (philosophical treatises, stories, folklore, plays, paintings, opera, and films) and discover the ways that they influenced the shape of the novel and how they appear within the dual story lines and the numerous characters.  Ultimately, the course will allow you to reexamine your own philosophy of good and Evil in the 21st century.

Text

The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov, Burgin & O’Connor, trans. New York: Vintage Books, 1995.

Faust, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, New York: Norton & Co. 2001.

The Divine Comedy, Dante Alighieri, New York; Everymans, 1995.

Packet of Readings (available at Speedway Printers in Dobie Mall).

 

Requirements and Grading Undergraduate

Short Essay (5 pp)                                                20%

Longer essay (10-12 pp)                                    30%

Final Examination                                                30%

Active enthusiastic participation                         20%

 

 

C L 305 • Vampire In Slavic Cultures

33295 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 100
(also listed as EUS 307, REE 302, SLA 301 )
show description

Required texts:

The Vampire in Slavic Culture, Course Reader (CR), T. J. Garza, ed., University Readers, San Diego: CA, 2009.

The Vampire: A Casebook, Alan Dundes, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1998.

Recommended texts:

 • The Darkling: A Treatise on Slavic Vampirism, Jan L. Perkowski, Columbus: Slavica Publishers, 1989.

Vampire Lore: From the Writings of Jan Louis Perkowski. Jan L. Perkowski, Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2006.

Blood Read: The Vampire as Metaphor in Contemporary Culture, J. Gordon and V. Hollinger, Philadelphia: UPenn Press, 1997.

Dracula, Bram Stoker, New York: Signet, 1997.

 I.         General

            Eight hundred years before Bram Stoker gave us the West's most memorable vampire in Dracula (1897) and long before the exploits of Vlad "the Impaler" Tepes horrified Europe (1431-46), the Russian Primary Chronicles write of a Novgorodian priest as Upyr' Likhij, or Wicked Vampire (1047).  The Slavic and Balkan worlds abound in histories, legends, myths and literary portraits of the so-called undead, creatures which draw life out of the living.

            This course examines the vampire in the cultures of Russia and Eastern Europe, including manifestations in literature, religion, art, film and common practices from its origins to 2009.  Texts – both print and non-print media – will be drawn from Russian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Serbian and Croatian sources.  Participants will be asked to separate historical fact from popular fiction, and form opinions about the place of the vampire in Slavic and East European cultures. 

The course is conducted in English.  No knowledge of Russian required, though readings in Russian and other Slavic languages are available for majors and concentrators in related fields.

II.        Course Requirements

 Attendance and Participation: You are expected to attend class meetings regularly, participate actively in discussions, do all assigned readings and film viewings, and prepare written assignments. Because the readings and critical approaches covered in this course are cumulative in design, your regular participation is required.  Students missing more than three (3) class sessions will receive a reduction of their final grade.  Students who miss more than five (5) classes, or who do not complete all four of the required components of the syllabus cannot pass the course. In extreme circumstances, the instructor may excuse absences.

Short Essays: Two brief (4-5 pages) reaction papers to one of the readings or media presentations covered in class are due by Thursday, October 1, and Thursday, November 5.  While these essays are not research based, they may contain references or support from external sources.

Midterm Exam: A comprehensive midterm exam over all material covered (readings, films, slides, and lectures) in the first half of the course will be given on Thursday, October 22.  The specific format of the midterm will be announced well before the exam date.

Final exam: An exam – comparable in format to the midterm – covering the material (readings, films, slides, lectures) from the second half of the course -- will be given during the University exam period on Wednesday, December 9 from 2:00 – 5:00 pm.

Special Accommodations: Any student with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations fro the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259. Any necessary accommodations should be presented to the instructor in written form.

 III.      Grading

In addition to regular attendance and participation, there are four components of the final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

Short essay I (4-5 pp.)          25%                            

Midterm exam                    25%

Short essay II (4-5 pp.)        25%                            

Final exam                         25%

All grades for this course will be assigned using the plus/minus system as follows:

A (4.00)?A- (3.67)?B+ (3.33)?B (3.00)?B- (2.67)?C+ (2.33)?C (2.00)?C- (1.67)?D+ (1.33)?D (1.00)?D- (.67)?F (0.00)

COURSE OUTLINE

Thursday, August 27           Introduction to SLA 301

                                                Overview of syllabus and course design for 301

                           • Definition of terms:  “Slavic” and “Vampire”

                           • Establishment of scene: the Carpathians and the Balkans

                                    View scene from Coppola’s Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula.’

For next meeting, read definitions of term “vampire” in the CR pp. 5-28, and “The History of the Word Vampire” in Dundes, pp. 3-11.

 

Tuesday, September 1         On Vampires and Upyri 

                           • The relationship between Slavic upyr and European vampire

For next session, read  “Poetic Views of the Slavs Regarding Nature” by

Afanasiev, “Heretics as Vampires and Demons in Russia” by Oinas , “Vampirism: Old World Folklore” by McNally & Floresçu,  “The Need Fire” by Fraser and“’Spoiling’ and ‘Healing’” by Ivanits in the CR pp. 29-66.

 

Thursday, September 3       Origins of Vampire Beliefs in the

                                                Slavic World

                           • Understanding the place of the vampire in the Slavic world

For the next session, read “The Epic of Gilgemesh: Prologue” by Kramer , “Lilith” by Guiley,  “Tlahuelpuchi” by Fraser and “Sirin” in the CR pp. 67-80.

 

Tuesday, September 8         From Folktales and Myths: Harpies and Sirin

                           • Folk belief, folklore and demons in the Slavic world

                           • Relationship between religion, paganism, and the vampire

For next meeting, read “Lycanthropy among the Ancients” by Baring-Gould, “The Werewolf: An Introduction” by Ashley, and “Lycanthropy and the Undead Corpse,” by Keyworth in CR pp. 81-118.

 

Thursday, September 11     Are Werewolves Vampires, Too?

                           • Werewolves, the undead and vampires

                           • The meaning behind the “vukodlak” in Slavic

 For next meeting, read “A Journey into Dracula Country” by Mascetti and “The Historical Dracula: Tyrant from Transylvania” by McNally and Floresçu in CR pp. 119-136.

 

Tuesday, September 15       Finding the Real “Dracula”

                           • Getting to know Transylvania

                           • The life and times of Vlad Tepes

For next meeting, read “Crusader Against the Turks” by McNally and Floresçu, and “Epilogue: The Imprisonment and Final Reign of Dracula” in CR pp. 137-158.

 

Thursday, September 17     Vlad “The Impaler” Dracula

                        • Who was the real Dracula?

                        • Why does the “myth” live on in Transylvania?

For next meeting, read “Bathory, Elizabeth,” by Melton, “Bathory, Elizabeth,” by Bunson, and “The Passion of Bathory: Bloody Christmas 1610,” by McNally in CR pp. 159-178.

 

Tuesday, September 22       Elizabeth Bathory

• How “vampirization” reports became part of the European tradition

For next meeting, read “Slavs, Vampires and the” in CR pp. 181-186.

 

Thursday, September 24     Vampires in the Slavic Lands

                           • The Balkans as backdrop for the vampire

                           • The vampire myth behind nationalism

For next meeting, read “In Defense of Vampires” in Dundes, pp. 57-66; and “Of Magic, Witches and Vampires in the Balkans,” “Bulgaria, Vampires in,” and “Southern Slavs, Vampires and the” in the CR pp. 187-204.

 

Tuesday, September 29       South Slavic Vampires

                           • The vampire as part of Balkan identity

For the next meeting, read “Gypsies , Vampires and the” in CR pp. 205-210.  First Reaction Paper is due on Thursday!

 

Thursday, October 1            Gypsies (Roma) and Vampires

                           • A culture within a culture

                        • Dispelling and creating racial prejudices

                        • Short Essay I due today

For the next meeting, read Oinas’ “East European Vampires” in Dundes, pp. 47-56; and “Russia, Vampires in,” by Melton, and “Tale of a Russian Vampire” by Blavatsky in CR pp. 211-220.

 

Tuesday, October 6              Russian Vampires

                           • Differences in East Slavic from the South Slavic Balkans

For next meeting, read Summers’ “Russia, Roumania and Bulgaria,” and Melton’s “Romania, Vampires in” in CR pp. 221-262.

 

Thursday, October 8            Central European Vampires, I

                        • The vampire in its historical home

                        • Issues of language and culture difference

For next meeting, read Murgoci’s and Perkowski’s “The Roumanian Folkloric Vampire” in Dundes pp. 12-34; and “Hungary, Vampires in,” “Czech Republic and Slovakia, Vampires in the” by Melton, and “The Golem” by DeBartolo in CR pp. 263-276.

 

Tuesday, October 13            Central European Vampires, II

                       • Beginnings of a literary tradition in vampire tales

                       • View and discuss The Golem

For next meeting, read “Peter Plogojowitz,” “The Shoemaker of Silesia,” and “Visum et Repertum” by Barber, and “Russian Stories” in CR pp. 277-306.

 

Thursday, October 15          Early Vampire Stories

                           • Connections between Vlad Tepes and European literature

                           • How the vampire legend reached Stoker in literature       

For next meeting, read Polidori’s/Byron’s “The Vampyre,” Chapter 2 from Stoker’s Dracula, and “From Dracula to Nosferatu” in CR pp. 309-330.

 

Tuesday, October 20            The Literary Vampire: From Byron to

Bram Stoker’s Dracula 

               • Connections between Vlad Tepes and European literature

               • How the vampire legend reached Stoker in literature       

 For next meeting, prepare for Midterm Exam (No new reading.).

 

Thursday, October 22          Midterm Exam

                           • In-class written exam over material (texts, films, slides, lectures)

For next meeting, read  Gibson’s “Dracula and the Eastern Question” in CR pp. 337-348, and watch and watch F.W. Murnau’s Nosferatu.

 

Thursday, October 27          The Literary Vampire: Film and the Slavic Tradition

                           • The vampire as the “Other” in film

                           • View scenes from Nosferatu (1922)

For next meeting, and Neruda’s “The Vampire” in CR pp. 349-352; and watch Todd Browning’s film Dracula (1931) with Bela Lugosi.

 

Thursday, October 29          The Vampire in Czech Literature

                           • Comparison of cultural tradition and literary works

                           • View scenes from Dracula (1931)

For next meeting, read Karamzin’s “The Island of Bornholm,” Pushkin’s “The Bridegroom” (two versions), “Evil Spirits,” and “The Drowned Man,” in CR pp. 353-382.

 

Tuesday, November 3        The Vampire in Russian Literature, I

               • Creating a literary standard for Russian for horror

For next meeting, read Tolstoy’s “The Family of the Vurdalak” in CR pp. 383-400. 

Second Reaction Paper is due on Thursday! 

 

Thursday, November 5      The Vampire in Russian Literature, II

               • A return to folk motifs in literary Russian

                           • View selection from Mario Bava’s Black Sunday

                           • Short Essay II due today.

 For next meeting, read Gogol’s “Viy,” and Turgenev’s “Phantoms: A Fantasy,” in CR pp. 401-456.

 

Thursday, November 5      The Vampire in Russian Literature, II

               • A return to folk motifs in literary Russian

                           • View selection from Mario Bava’s Black Sunday

                           • Short Essay II due today.

For next meeting, read Gogol’s “Viy,” and Turgenev’s “Phantoms: A Fantasy,” in CR pp. 401-456.

 

Thursday, November 12    The Vampire in Russian Literature, IV

                           • Fantasy moves from the 19th to the 20th century

                           • View selection from Bortko’s Master and Margarita 

For next meeting, read Pelevin’s “A Werewolf Problem in Central Russia,” and selection from Night Watch by Lukyanenko in CR pp. 471-508.

 

Tuesday, November 17      Russian Vampires for the New Century

                           • The Postmodern Slavic vampire in literature and film

                           • View scenes from Night Watch (2004)

For next meeting, read Barber’s “Forensic Pathology and the European Vampire” in Dundes, and “Protection from Blood Drinkers,” by Konstantinos and “The Rational Slayer” by McClelland in CR pp. 511-536.

 

Thursday, November 19    How to Kill a (Slavic) Vampire

                           • Death of the undead?

                           • More folk mythology in eliminating the vampire

For next meeting, read song lyrics for Vysotsky, Lika, Linda, and Detsl in CR pp. 539-550.

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

Tuesday, December 1          Vampires and Russian Pop Music

                           • View Russian music videos of the ‘90s and ‘00s

                           • Incorporating vampires into pop culture

For last meeting, read lyrics for The Leg Cramps, B-2, Uma2rman,

Night Snipers, and Grigoriy Leps in CR pp. 551-561.

 

Thursday, December 3        Russian Rock, Goths and Vamps

                           • View Russian music videos of the 2000s

                           •Examine web-based Russian gothic movement

                           • Final exam format

Prepare for Final Examination

 

 

 

 

Awards/Honors

• Graduate School Diversity Mentoring Fellowship, University of Texas (2013)

• Special Faculty Assignment for Research and Writing of Book Manuscript, College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas (2012)

• American Council of Teachers of Russian Service to the Profession Award, American Councils for International Education (2012)

• Service Award, Services for Students with Disabilities, University of Texas (2011)

• Texas Language Technology Center College Research Fellowship, College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas (2010)

• Burnt Orange Apple Award for Pedagogy, Division of Instructional Innovation and Assessment, University of Texas (2009)

• Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award recipient, inaugural cohort, University of Texas System Board of Regents (2009)

• Mortar Board Honor Society Preferred Professor Award, University of Texas (2006, 2007)

• Elected to the Academy of Distinguished Teachers, University of Texas (2003)

• Silver Spurs Centennial Teaching Award, University of Texas (2003)

• National Award for Post Secondary Teaching, American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages (2001)

• Elected to Who’s Who in America (2001)

• Harry Ransom Teaching Excellence Award, Liberal Arts, University of Texas (1999)

• Dean's Fellowship, College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas (Spring 1998)

• President’s Associates Teaching Excellence Award, University of Texas (1995)

• Texas Excellence in Teaching Award, College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas (1991-92) 

Publications

Current Book Project:

Bandits No More: Marginal Masculinities in Contemporary Mexican and Russian Popular Cultures: A cultural reading and critical response, using works from masculinity studies and gender theory, to the filmic, musical, and televised portraits of Russian and Latino men in the 1990s and 2000s, focusing on the parallel cultural shift in both Russian and Mexican cultures from traditional “macho” male roles, to an intellectualized, “feminized” new machismo of the new millennium. Examples drawn from cultural products – film, television, popular music, and press – from the last twenty years offer evidence of a palpable shift in the popular presentations and consumer perceptions of machismo in these two diverse cultural environments. 

Books:

[contributor] Russian Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1, D.E. Davidson, M.D. Lekic, and K. Gor, in collaboration with I. Dubinina, T. Garza, and N. Vanyushkina, Dubuque : Kendall-Hunt Publishers, Inc., 2008, 490 pp.

[contributor] Russian Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 2, D.E. Davidson, M.D. Lekic, and K. Gor, in collaboration with I. Dubinina, T. Garza, and N. Vanyushkina, Dubuque: Kendall-Hunt Publishers, Inc., 2009, 563 pp.

Breakthrough! American English for Speakers of Russian, Level 1, with  Lapidus, Barchenkov, and Tolkacheva, Russian-American Collaborative Project on  the English Language, D.E. Davidson and I.I. Khaleeva, series eds.,  Vysshaja shkola,  Moscow, 1995, 350 pp.  

Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Students and Teachers: A  Dictionary/Handbook of the One-Stem System with Commentaries, Kendall/Hunt  Publishers, Inc. and ACTR Publications, 1994, 235 pp.

Growing Up in America, with Diane Warshawsky, textbook to accompany video tapes in the In America English language series, International Horizons, Inc., Curaçao, N.V., 1985, 94 pp.

Rockin' in America, with Alan Turri, textbook to accompany video tapes in the In America English language series, International Horizons, Inc., Curaçao, N.V., 1985, 95 pp.

Then and Now in America, with Alan Turri, Cheryl Pavlik, and Victoria Kimbrough, textbook to accompany video tapes in the In America English language series, International Horizons, Inc., Curaçao, N.V., 1985, 95 pp.

Edited Volumes:

The Russian Fairy Tale: Course Reader. Contributing editor, translator, and compiler. San Diego: Cognella Publishers, San Diego, 2013. 287 pp.

The Vampire in Slavic Cultures: Course Reader. Contributing editor, translator, and compiler. San Diego: University Readers Publishers, 2009, 573 pp.Revised and expanded version with on-line supplement published by Cognella Publishers, San Diego, 2010. 584 pp.

The Russian Mosaic: An Exploratory Course in Russian Language, Culture, and Area Studies. Contributing editor, with Mark Hopkins, materials preparation.Modular course materials, PowerPoint presentations, CD, DVD and Teacher’s Guide for six-week familiarization program for secondary schools. University of Texas at Austin, 2011.

Russian for Dummies: A Reference for the Rest of Us, Technical editor for all textual materials and audio recording transcripts, New York: John Wiley & Sons Publications, 2006, 363 pp. + CD.

Тренируйте английский самостоятельно [Practice English on Your Own], Technical editor for all linguistic exercise materials, cultural information, illustrations, transcripts, and digital audio recordings, Vysshaya shkola Publishers: Moscow, 1999, 176 pp. + audio tapes.

Proficient Programs for Proficient Students: Proceedings of the UT/NEH Symposium on the Teaching of Russian Language and Culture in US Secondary Schools, volume of selected seminar participants’ contributions in teaching Russian in secondary and post-secondary education; co-edited with Michael R. Katz. University of Texas at Austin, 1996, 121 pp.

Visions for the Future: Proceedings of the First Soviet-American Symposium on Theoretical Problems of Foreign Language Teaching and Learning, contributing co-editor with A.A. Barchenkov, Rema Press, Moscow, 1992, 112 pp.  Published simultaneously in a Russian-language version as Глядя в будущее: Первый советско-американский симпозиум по теоретическим проблемам преподавания иизучения иностранных языковA. Barchenkov and T. Garza, eds., Rema Press, Moscow, 1992, 128 pp.

Serbo-Croatian: Basic Course, vols. 1 and 2, writing team project director and contributing text editor, Foreign Service Institute, School of Language Studies, U.S. Department of State, Washington, D.C., 1990, 443 pp. and 426 pp. + digital audio and testing/assessment supplements. Published simultaneously in Latinate variant as Croato-Serbian: \Basic Course, vols. 1 and 2, with digital audio and testing/assessment supplements.

Articles: 

“Славянские вампиры в Техасе: задачи и методы вампироведения [“Slavic vampires in Texas: Issues and methods of vampire studies”] with Yekaterina Cotey [50% contribution], Библиотечное дело [Library Matter], no. 4 (214), 2014, pp. 16-20.

“From Russia with blood: Imagining the vampire in contemporary Russian popular culture,” in The Universal Vampire Series Vol. 1: Origins and Evolution of a Legend. Barbara Brodman and James Doan, eds., Farleigh Dickinson University Press, Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2013, pp. 195-208..   

“Keeping it real: Intensive instruction and the future of Russian language and culture in the US,” Special Symposium in Traditions and Transitions: Russian Language Teaching in the United States, Special issue of Russian Language Journal, vol. 63, 2013, pp. 7-24.

“Blogging and tweeting and chat, oh my! Social networks and classroom culture, and foreign language instruction” Special Volume: Festschrift for Richard D. Brecht, Russian Language Journal, vol. 60, 2011, pp. 125-140.

“Class, please open your browser: Social networking in the language and culture classroom,” in «Мост: Язык и культура», Dobroljubov Pedagogical University, Nizhny Novgorod, Spring No. 15, 2010, pp. 103-108. Published concurrently as revised and expanded article in conference proceedings for the Russian Humanities University conference on the American cultural scene, Moscow Russia, 2010.

“(Un)Chained melodies: Russian music videos in web-based language and culture instruction,” in Mnemosynon: Studies on Language and Culture in the Russophone World, R.D. Brecht, L.A. Verbitskaya, M.D. Lekic, and W.M. Rivers, eds. Moscow: Azbukovnik, 2009, pp. 313 - 330.

Не трожь молодёжь! [Don’t touch the youth!]: A Portrait of Urban Youthspeak and “From Aga Khan to dim sum: New Russia’s Asian appetite,” Ulbandus: The Slavic Review of Columbia University, vol. 11, 2008 pp. 1-22. 

“Conservative vanguard? The politics of New Russia’s youth,” Current History, vol. 105, no. 693, October 2006 pp. 327-333.

 “From Aga Khan to dim sum: New Russia’s Asian appetite,” Ulbandus: The Slavic Review of Columbia University, vol. 11, 2008 pp. 1-22.

''€Russian Music and Dance,''€ [invited book chapter] in Russian Common Knowledge,  Genevra Gerhart and Eloise Boyle, eds., Bloomington: Slavica Publishers,  2001. 62  pp. 

''€Getting from Gorbachev to Grunge: Constructing Ethnographic Portraits to  Introduce Contemporary Russian Culture,''€ The Learning and Teaching of Slavic  Languages and Cultures: Toward the 21st Century, Olga Kagan and Benjamin Rifkin,  eds.  Bloomington:  Slavica Publishers, 2000. pp. 61 - 80.  

“Какова цена овладения языком?  Преподавание русского языка в заре движения за полное овладение языком”  [“What price proficiency?  Russian language instruction in US universities in the wake of the proficiency movement”]; published simultaneously in Russian and English versions in Преподавание русского языка и литературы в США and Teaching Russian Language and Literature in the US, vol. 2, Delbert Phillips, ed.  Syntaxis Press, Moscow, 1996, pp. 52-63.

“Privilege, or noblesse oblige of the nonnative speaker of Russian? A response to Claire Kramsch's 'The privilege of the nonnative speaker'” in The Sociolinguistics of Foreign-Language Classrooms, AAUSC Annual Volume, C. Blyth, ed. Boston: Heinle and Heinle, 2003 pp. 273-276.

“Foreign language reading anxiety,” [33% contribution] with Yoshiko Saito and Elaine K. Horwitz, Modern Language Journal, vol. 83, no. 2, Summer 1999 pp. 202-218.

“Inter-level articulation: Toward a process-focused model for Russian language programs,” with John Watzke [50% contribution], Slavic and East European Journal, vol. 41, no. 2, Summer 1997, pp. 105-125.

“The imagination and CD-ROM: Multimedia language and culture instruction” in Journal of the Imagination in Language Learning, vol. 3, Coreil and Napoliello, eds. Jersey City State College, 1996, pp. 36-40.

“The message is the medium: Using video materials to facilitate foreign language performance,” Texas Papers in Foreign Language Education, The University of Texas at Austin, vol. 2, no. 2, 1996, pp. 1-18.

“Authentic contact with native speech and culture at home and abroad,” with Robert Frye [50% contribution], in Teaching Languages at College: Curriculum and Content, Wilga M. Rivers, ed., National Textbook Company, 1991, pp. 225-243.  Also translated into Japanese for 1995 Tokyo edition.

“Beyond MTV: Music videos as foreign language text,” in Journal of the Imagination in Language Learning, vol. 2, Coreil and Napoliello, eds. Jersey City State College, 1994, pp. 106-111.

“Cultural literacy, video, and the foreign language classroom,” in Visions for the Future: Proceedings of the First Soviet-American Symposium on Theoretical Problems of Foreign Language Teaching and Learning, A. Barchenkov and T. Garza, eds. Rema Press, Moscow, June 1992, pp. 40-47.  Author's translation published simultaneously as “Введение культурной граммотности в обучение иностранным языкам,” in Глядя в будущее: Первый советско-американский симпозиум по теоритическим проблемам преподавания и изучения иностранных языков.  A. Barchenkov and T. Garza, eds. Rema Press, Moscow, June 1992, pp. 44-52.

“Evaluating the use of captioned video materials in advanced foreign language learning,” Foreign Language Annals, vol. 24, no. 3, May 1991, pp. 239-258.

“Лучше раз увидеть...?  Видео в обучении иностранным языкам”  [“Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words?  Video in Foreign Language Study”] with Maria D. Lekic [50% contribution], Русский язык за рубежом [Russian Language Abroad], no. 3, 1990, pp. 71-76.

“Применение видеоматериалов с титрами на продвинутом этапе обучения русскому языку,” [“Using Captioned Video Materials in Teaching Advanced Russian”], in American Contributions to the 7th International MAPRIAL Congress, D. E. Davidson, ed. ACTR Publications, Washington, D.C., 1990, pp. 107-121.

 “What you see is what you get... Or is it?  Bringing cultural literacy into the foreign language classroom through video,” Georgetown University Roundtable on Languages and Linguistics, James E. Alatis, ed., Georgetown University Press, Washington, D.C., 1990, pp. 285-292.

“Language and the computer,” in Language and the World of Work in the Twenty-First Century, symposium proceedings of the Bureau of Transitional Bilingual Education, Massachusetts Department of Education, 1986, pp. 38-40.

“Beyond Lozanov: The Intensive Method as a practical application of suggestopaedia in foreign language teaching,” in On TESOL '84: A Brave New World for TESOL, Washington, DC, Winter 1984, pp. 203-213.

 

Book Reviews:

After Newspeak: Language, Culture, and Politics in Russia from Gorbachev to Putin. In Slavic and East European Journal. Fall 2014, vol. 58, no. 2. [In press].

Fangs of the Lone Wolf: Chechen Tactics in the Russian-Chechen Wars 1994-2009. In The Russian Review, October 2014. vol. 73, no. 4. [In press].

The Quest for an Ideal Youth in Putin’s Russia I: Back to Our Future! History, Modernity and Patriotism according to Nashi, 2005-2012.  In The Russian Review, October 2013. vol. 72, no. 4. pp. 724-726.

The Quest for an Ideal Youth in Putin’s Russia II: The Search for Distinctive Conformism in the Political Communication of Nashi, 2005-2009. In The Russian Review, October 2013. vol. 72, no. 4. pp. 726-728.

The Monkeys Are Coming: Russian Drama of the 1920s. Michael A. Green, Jerome H. Katsell, and Stanislav A. Shvabrin, eds. and trans. In The NEP-Era: Soviet Russia 1921-1928, vol. 7, 2013, pp. 71-74.

Сетевые разговоры: культурвые коммуникации в Рунете [Web Conversations: Cultural Communication on Runet].  In The Russian Language Journal.  vol. 63, 2013, pp. 311-314.

Singing the Self: Guitar Poetry, Community, and Identity in the Post-Stalin Period, Rachel S. Platonov. In Slavic and East European Journal. Winter 2013, vol. 57, no. 4. pp. 690-691.

Moscow Prime Time: How the Soviet Union Built the Media Empire that Lost the Cultural Cold War, Kristin Roth-Ely. In History: Reviews of New Books. December 2012, vol 41, no. 1. pp. 24-25.

Vampire Nation: Violence as Cultural Imagery, Tomislav Z. Longinovic. In Slavic and East European Journal. Fall 2012, vol. 56, no. 3. pp. 489-491.

Television and Culture in Putin’s Russia. Stephen Hutchings and Natalia Rulyova, eds. In Canadian Slavonic Papers / Revue canadienne des slavistes.  May-June 2012, vol. 54, nos. 1-2, pp. 224-225.

New Approaches to Slavic Verbs of Motion, Victoria Hasko and Rachel Perlemutter, eds. In Slavic and East European Journal. Fall 2011, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 144-145.

From Poets to Padonki, Ingunn Lunde and Martin Paulsen, eds. In Slavonica, vol. 16, No. 2. November 2010, pp. 46-48.

Slayers and Their Vampires:  A Cultural History of Killing the Dead. Bruce A. McClelland. In Slavic and East European Journal. Fall 2010, vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 561-562.

Vampire Lore: From the Writings of Jan Louis Perkowski. Jan L. Perkowski. In Slavic and East European Journal. Spring 2009, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 133-134.

Worlds Apart: An Anthology of Russian Fantasy and Science Fiction. Alexander Levitsky, ed. and trans. In Slavic and East European Journal, Winter 2008, v. 52, n.4, pp. 618-620.

Культурные исследования: Сборник научных работ [Cultural Studies: A Collection of Essays]. Etkind and P. Lysakov, eds., in The Russian Review, vol. 64, no. 4, October 2008, pp. 722-723.

Under the Sky of My Africa: Alexander Pushkin and Blackness. C. Nepomnyashchy, N. Svobodny, and L. Trigos, eds., in Slavic and East European Journal, Winter 2007, vol. 51, no. 4, pp. 788-789.

Alien Visions: The Chechens and the Navajos in Russian and American Literature. Margaret Ziolkowski, in Slavic and East European Journal. Winter 2006, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 707-708.

Beyond the Color Line and the Iron Curtain: Reading Encounters Between Black and Red 1922-1963. Kate Baldwin, The Comparatist. May 2004, vol. XXVIII, pp. 179-181.

Up from Bondage: The Literatures of Russian and African American Soul. Dale Peterson, in The Comparatist. May 2002, vol. XXVI, pp. 152-154.

 

 

 

Media

“The Popularity of Vampires in the 21st Century,” interview on Fox News “Good Day, Austin!” Austin, TX (October 28, 2014)

http://www.myfoxaustin.com/Clip/10784110/dracula

 

“The Slavic Vampire,” 15 Minute History podcast presentation for ‘Not Even Past’ and Hemispheres, University of Texas, Austin, TX (October 30, 2013)

http://blogs.utexas.edu/15minutehistory/2013/10/30/episode-29-the-slavic-vampire

 

“In the Wake of the Boston Bombing: History between Chechnya and the U.S.,” interview on KVUE News, Austin TX (April 20, 2013)

http://www.kvue.com/video/featured-videos/An-expert-discusses-Chechnya-203908531.html

 

“Death of Adopted Russian Toddler Puts Texas in the Middle of Russian Political Drama,” interview with Houston Chronicle (February 20, 2013)

http://blog.chron.com/txpotomac/2013/02/ toddlers-death-puts-texas-in-the-middle-of-a-russian-political-drama/

 

“The Slavic Vampire and Modern Imaginings,” interview on “Good Day Austin,” FOX News, Austin, TX (October 24, 2011)

http://www.myfoxaustin.com/dpp/good_day/UT-Enchants-Students-With-Vampire-Class-20111025-ktbcw

 

“Teaching about Vampires as an Introduction to Cultural Studies,” Blogged interview on “Diary of An Amateur Vampirologist” (September 2011)

http://doaav.blogspot.com/2011/09/q-with-thomas-j-garza.html

 

“Vampires, Media, and Youth,” Radio interview on MPS in the Morning, Michigan Talk Radio WJIM, Detroit, Michigan (August 19, 2011)

http://www.wjimam.com/Article.asp?id=2290661&spid=.

 

“The Family of the Vurdalak,” On-line video featurette for Liberal Arts Media web special presentation Slowly I Turned…” at University of Texas at Austin (October 2009)

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/public-affairs/features/_features/Slowly-I-Turned.php

 

“In Search of the Truth: Vampires," Good Morning America, ABC television interview and subject expert on broadcast feature segment (March 26, 2009)

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/AroundTheWorld/story?id=7174356&page=1

 

“Twilight,” ShelfLife@Texas, University of Texas at Austin, College of Liberal Arts (January 2009)

http://www.utexas.edu/opa/blogs/shelflife/2008/11/18/interview-with-a-vampire-expert/

 

“Shipwreck of the Black Sea,” Feature Story, University of Texas at Austin (October 27, 2008)

http://www.utexas.edu/know/2008/10/27/shipwrecks-of-the-black-sea/

 

“True Bloodlines: A New Type” feature documentary for HBO Productions “True Blood” television miniseries (September 2008)

http://www.truebloodshow.com/

 

“True Bloodlines: Vampire Legends” feature documentary for HBO Productions “True Blood” television miniseries (September 2008)

http://www.truebloodshow.com/

 

“’30 Days of Night’: First Look,” Attack of the Show, G4 Network (October 2007)

http://www.movieweb.com/video/HUOsDVRQBRstTQ

 

“Vampire Featurette” for Sony/Columbia Picture’s film 30 Days of Night on Movieweb (October 2007)

http://www.movieweb.com/video/V07J34grABJNSU

 

“The Vampire on Film” for Sony/Columbia Picture’s film 30 Days of Night on Movieweb (October 2007)

http://www.movieweb.com/video/V07J48bcdwzACI

 

“The Vampire and the Slavs,” Take 5: Faculty Insights in Brief, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (2006)

http://www.utexas.edu/inside_ut/take5/garza/

Web-Based Materials

“Surfing the Russian Net: Tools and Materials for Conducting Basic Internet Research in Russian,” Web-based tutorials funded through FAST-Tex, Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Services, College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas, 2010-2011.  Available as online OER as “Café Russia: Get Ready, Get Set, Go!”

http://laits.utexas.edu/cafe-russia/

 

“Culture in Foreign Language Teaching: The Fifth Skill,” teacher training module for on-line methods course, funded through the Texas Higher Education
Coordinating Board, Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Services and the Texas Language Technology Center, College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas, 2008-2010. 

http://www.coerll.utexas.edu/methods/modules/culture/

 

“The Language Teacher,” teacher training module for on-line methods course, funded through the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Services and the Texas Language Technology Center, College of Liberal
Arts, University of Texas, 2008-2010.

http://www.coerll.utexas.edu/methods/modules/teacher/

“Teaching with Different Orthographies,” teacher training module for on-line methods course, funded through the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Services and the Texas Language Technology Center, College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas, 2008-2010.

http://www.coerll.utexas.edu/methods/modules/writing/01/orthographies.php

 

 “Retro Russian,” a multi-level proficiency-based online program for using vintage music video to introduce Russian culture and history while practicing relevant language, in collaboration with Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Services and the Texas Language Technology Center, College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas, 2009-2010.

http://coerll.utexas.edu/rr/retro/

 

“Viewing for Proficiency: Using Video Materials in Concert with Russian language textbook project Live from Russia!” an on-line guide for teachers using authentic video in teaching Russian, in conjunction with the Russian: Stage One textbook project, 2008.

http://www.livefromrussia.org/content/teacher/docs/Video%20Guide.pdf

 

“Rockin’ Russian,” a multi-level proficiency-based Russian language and culture instruction program online, based on contemporary Russian rock music videos with level-relevant exercise materials, in collaboration with Liberal Arts
Instructional Technology Services and the Texas Language Technology Center, College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas, 2007-2008.

http://coerll.utexas.edu/rr/index.html

 

“Russian History Online: The Khrushchev Years,” a collaborative multimedia cultural history project with the University of Texas at Austin, Moscow State University and Abamedia, LP, with substantial funding from the Carnegie Foundation, 2005.

http://russianarchives.com/rho/index.html

Undergraduate Courses

LANGUAGE COURSES

RUS 601C Intensive First Year Russian I

Course Description

Добро пожаловать! Welcome to the Russian 601c – an intensive and unique adventure in language acquisition! This course is designed to bring you quickly to functional proficiency in the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world. More that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world, speak Russian. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn, among others. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, and Putin. As the most recent addition to the G8 summit meetings, Russia is fast becoming a major player of the global economy. The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students each year, including a sizeable number of summer students from UT on our program “Moscow Plus.”  We hope you’ll be among them next summer!

Course Content: This course is the first semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed primarily through workbook and computer-based home assignments.  We will cover all of 
Volumes One and Two of the textbooks, Units One through Unit Fourteen, spending about one week on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functional and competitive in the language. 

 

RUS 326 Russia at the Movies: 1936-1979

Course Description

So you know a lot of grammar and words; you’ve maybe even already been to Russia. Now what? This course is the seventh semester of Russian language instruction developing proficiency in listening and speaking through exposure to authentic Russian print, audio and video materials based on Russian cinema classics! You will have the opportunity to express yourself in a wide variety of discourse genres including persuasion (e.g., convince your friend to watch "Ирония судьбы" with you), oration (e.g., give a speech in a Russian school on your favorite American film), and explication (explain to a Russian in Moscow why Tarkovsky is a better director than Mikhalkov). The classic Russian films themselves will provide a variety of related Russia realia (print, video, audio) to supplement the themes of each film to enhance your communication skills. The films covered in the course are: "Цирк," "Золушка," "Летят журавли," "Иван Васильевич меняет профессию," "Ирония судьбы, или С лёгким паром!" "Москва слезам не верит, and "Осенний марафон. The course is conducted entirely in Russian – of course! Итак, давайте пойдём в кино!

 
 

LOWER DIVSION COURSES

Fall 2011 SLA 301/REE 302/C L 305/EUS 307 “The Vampire in Slavic Cultures”

Eight hundred years before Bram Stoker gave us the West's most memorable vampire in Dracula (1897) and long before the exploits of Vlad "the Impaler" Tepes horrified Europe (1431-46), the Russian Primary Chronicles write of a Novgorodian priest as Upyr' Likhij, or Wicked Vampire (1047).  The Slavic and Balkan worlds abound in histories, legends, myths and literary portraits of the so-called undead, creatures that literally draw life out of the living.

   This course examines the vampire in the cultures of Russia and Eastern Europe, including manifestations in literature, religion, art, film and common practices from its origins to 2011.  Texts – both print and non-print media – will be drawn from Russian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Serbian and Croatian sources.  Participants will be asked to separate historical fact from popular fiction, and form opinions about the place of the vampire in Slavic and East European cultures. 

The course is conducted in English.  No knowledge of Russian required, though readings in Russian and other Slavic languages are available for majors and concentrators in these related fields.

 

UPPER DIVSION COURSES 

 

RUS 330/REE 325  From Gorbachev to Grunge: Russian Youth Culture

Course Description

The social and political upheaval that shook the Soviet Union in the late 1980s has fascinated and intrigued the Western media and analysts to the present day. But how well do we understand the causes and effects of the dramatic social, political, and cultural changes that mark the landscape of the new Russia of the 1990s and the 2000s?  What role did Russia’s youth play in the historic transformation of their country? And do UT's “millennials” have anything to learn from the Soviet experience of a disenfranchised generation of Young Marxists choosing to embrace Capitalism and Coldplay instead of Communism and Cold War?

            This course will provide participants with the original source materials to construct an ethnographic portrait of Russia’s contemporary youth and their culture, drawing from a variety of print, audio, and video sources.  In addition to reading extensively from diverse genres, including the Russian press, editorials, contemporary prose, and non-fiction, students in the course should be prepared to immerse themselves in the rich and creative non-print media coming directly out of Moscow and Saint-Petersburg in the wake of post-Soviet reforms.  Using popular depictions of Russia’s own “twentysomethings” from recent films, documentaries, news sources, rock music lyrics, and art, students will try to come to understand how the youth movement affected and continues to affect the changing course of one of the world’s superpowers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. 

            Readings and media presentations in the course will focus on the current attitudes of Russian youth toward politics, music, drugs, sex, money and the military from the period of Gorbachev’s perestroika to 2015.  This course will be conducted -- as much as possible – as an interactive large seminar, with student participation constituting a significant part of the usual "lecture" quotient of the course.  Though all required readings for the course are in English, additional readings or original texts in Russian for majors and graduate students in Slavic studies and/or related fields will be made available by topic.

This course carries the Global Cultures  flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States, such as Russians. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of Russia, past and present.

 

RUS 360/CL 323/REE 385 Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita: A Source Study

Course Description

Stalin’s Moscow, 1936, The Devil and his gang have come to the mortal world to determine how Mankind is faring in the 20th century.  He encounters a motley crew of Soviet bureaucrats, writers, politicians and arts who offer little hope for the future.  Enter the “Master”, an unknown writer struggling to finish a novel about the life of Christ told from the perspective of Pontius Pilate.  Can one writer and his work be reason enough to prevent the apocalypse? Enter Margarita, the Master’s selfless companion and heroine of Mikhail Bulgakov’s masterpiece, The Master and Margarita.  Regarded by many readers and critics as one of the greatest novels of our time, The Master and Margarita is a fixed part of Russian culture.  This course will explore not only the intricacies of the novel itself, but also its place among Bulgakov’s other literary works, and its varied sources from world literature, music and the visual arts.  More importantly, it reveals the brilliance and complexities of art created under a strict totalitarian regime.  This course will examine—within the Stalin-era Soviet context—the texts and philosophies that significantly influenced Bulgakov in the creation of his novel.  You will examine these various texts (philosophical treatises, stories, folklore, plays, paintings, opera, and films) and discover the ways that they influenced the shape of the novel and how they appear within the dual story lines and the numerous characters.  Ultimately, the course will allow you to reexamine your own philosophy of good and Evil in the 21st century.

 

 

Graduate Courses

REE 385 Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita: A Source Study

Course Description

Stalin’s Moscow, 1936, The Devil and his gang have come to the mortal world to determine how Mankind is faring in the 20th century.  He encounters a motley crew of Soviet bureaucrats, writers, politicians and arts who offer little hope for the future.  Enter the “Master”, an unknown writer struggling to finish a novel about the life of Christ told from the perspective of Pontius Pilate.  Can one writer and his work be reason enough to prevent the apocalypse? Enter Margarita, the Master’s selfless companion and heroine of Mikhail Bulgakov’s masterpiece, The Master and Margarita.  Regarded by many readers and critics as one of the greatest novels of our time, The Master and Margarita is a fixed part of Russian culture.  This course will explore not only the intricacies of the novel itself, but also its place among Bulgakov’s other literary works, and its varied sources from world literature, music and the visual arts.  More importantly, it reveals the brilliance and complexities of art created under a strict totalitarian regime.  This course will examine—within the Stalin-era Soviet context—the texts and philosophies that significantly influenced Bulgakov in the creation of his novel.  You will examine these various texts (philosophical treatises, stories, folklore, plays, paintings, opera, and films) and discover the ways that they influenced the shape of the novel and how they appear within the dual story lines and the numerous characters.  Ultimately, the course will allow you to reexamine your own philosophy of good and Evil in the 21st century.

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