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Michael R. Anderson, Director 305 E. 23rd Street, A1300 78712 • 512-232-6344

Course Descriptions

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

40220-40235 • Anderson, Michael R.
Meets MW 900am-1000am ART 1.102
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This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ new interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies.  Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world, including:  How has the modern international system come into being?  What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization?  To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today?  Finally, are we entering a “post-American world,” and if so, what global repercussions might this entail?  This course will attempt to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of social sciences—whether political science, economics, or anthropology—and instead ask students to take a more holistic view of global issues, rooted in historical inquiry.
Class time will be divided evenly between lecture material and discussion.  Students will be evaluated based upon their performance in weekly online discussions, periodic in-class short-answer responses and multiple-choice quizzes, a mid-term paper and a final essay.


Course Objectives:
By the end of the semester, students will have the ability to:
1)    describe a broad array of global issues confronting international actors
2)    evaluate the role of the United States in the contemporary era of “globalization”
3)    identify and analyze in some detail the scholarly debate surrounding a particular global challenge or crisis

IRG 320F • Found Intl Rels/Gloal Stds-Fra

40240 • Anderson, Michael R.
Meets
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IRG 320F (UT in Paris 2014) course description

 

This course is designed to provide foundational knowledge in a particular subject area related to International Relations and Global Studies, providing a link between the introductory course (IRG 301) and capstone seminar (IRG 378) for IRG majors. The scope and the theme of the course cross-cut the broad subject areas of the major’s four tracks: international security; international political economy; science, technology, and the environment; and culture, media, and the arts. 

 

There are two over-arching objectives of this course. The first is to examine in detail some key ideological concepts underpinning the perspectives of those pursuing an IRG major, especially “internationalism,” “globalism,” and “regionalism.” Using insights from history, political science, economics, geography, anthropology, and area studies, we will ask how these “-isms” shape our view of contemporary global affairs. What they can tell us about the nature of today’s international system, the possibility of political and economic global governance, as well as international civil society? A second, related objective is to help students conceive a project for their capstone seminar, normally taken soon after the completion of IRG 320F. Through the process of writing a research proposal and delivering an oral presentation to the class on their proposed subject, students in this course will lay the foundation for a successful capstone seminar experience.

 

For the UT in Paris program, this course has been specially designed to take full advantage of the location. In many ways, Paris is an ideal setting in which to base a course centered on the broad themes of international relations and global studies. Over hundreds of years, Paris has earned a reputation as one of the most important international cities of the world. It houses the headquarters of several key intergovernmental as well as nongovernmental organizations; it serves as a critical node in the world of art and fashion; indeed, for many years the city’s cultural offerings represented the apex of what many considered to be “civilized” and “cosmopolitan.” Through numerous excursions to Paris-based organizations – the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and the Académie Diplomatique Internationale (ADI), among others – students will see first-hand the work of diplomats, businesspeople, scholars, and activists, engaged in constructing the basis of a still-emerging and hotly contested international order. 

 

Readings:

 

PDF articles will be posted on Blackboard. No required books.

 

 

Grading breakdown:

 

Assignment                                         Value (percent)

Attendance/participation                     10

Blackboard discussion                        15

Reading Response Essay 1                 20

Reading Response Essay 2                 20

Research Project Proposal                  25

Oral Presentation                              10

IRG 320F • Foundatn Intl Rels/Global Stds

40245 • Holmsten, Stephanie
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GEA 105
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IRG 320F: Foundations in International Relations and Global Studies

 

This course is designed to provide foundational knowledge in a particular subject area related to international relations and global studies, providing a link between the introductory course (IRG 301) and capstone seminar (IRG 378) for IRG majors. The scope and the theme of the course cross-cut the broad subject areas the major’s four tracks: international security; international political economy; science, technology, and the environment; and culture, media, and the arts. 

 

There are two over-arching objectives of this course. The first is to examine in some detail ideological concepts related to the IRG major, especially “internationalism,” “globalism,” and “regionalism.” Using insights from history, political science, economics, geography, anthropology, and area studies, we will ask how these “-isms” shape our view of contemporary global affairs. What they can tell us about the nature of today’s international system/systems, the possibility of political and economic global governance, as well as international civil society?

 

A second, related objective is to help students conceive a project for their capstone seminar, normally taken soon after the completion of IRG 320F. Students are required to select a topic of global or regional importance and write a literature review of scholarly articles related to that subject. Through this process, students are exposed to the contemporary academic debates surrounding that subject, and thus are better prepared to complete a capstone project in IRG 378.

 

Texts (subject to amendment):

  • Haas, Peter H. and John A Hird, eds. 2013. Controversies in Globalization: Contending Approaches to International Relations. 2nd ed. Thousand Oaks: CQ Press.

Grading breakdown (subject to amendment):

 

  1. Attendance (5 percent)
  2. Response papers (10 percent)
  3. First exam (20 percent)
  4. Second exam (20 percent)
  5. Third exam (20 percent)
  6. Literature review (25 percent)

 

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40250 • Holmsten, Stephanie
Meets W 300pm-600pm GDC 2.502
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IRG 378 #40250

Capstone Research, Wednesday

 

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue relating to culture, media and the arts; or science, environment, and technology. Globalization will provide the overarching perspective into these related issues.

 

Required Text:  Frank J. Lechner and John Boli, eds., The Globalization Reader, 4th ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

 

Flags:

Independent Inquiry

Writing

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40255 • Holmsten, Stephanie
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 2.112
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IRG 378 #40255

Capstone Research, Monday

 

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue relating to international political economy, world markets, international organizations and state sovereignty. Globalization will provide the overarching perspective into these related issues.

 

Required Text:  Frank J. Lechner and John Boli, eds., The Globalization Reader, 4th ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

 

Flags:

Independent Inquiry

Writing

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40260 • Mosser, Michael W
Meets T 330pm-630pm SZB 524
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Course concept

As an academic field of inquiry, international security tends to focus on the ability of states to remain secure in the face of threats to their internal and external sovereignty. Increasingly, however, the study of security has broadened to include not merely new actors, but also new conceptions of what it means to be ‘secure.’ While conflict among and within states (and increasingly non-state actors) is a major concern, the idea that insecurity can exist but still stop short of conflict has become increasingly accepted among both scholars and practitioners.     

Moreover, conflict and security have evolved since the end of the Cold War. While possible, the idea of a superpower-on-superpower strategic conflict on the scale of World War II seems increasingly unlikely. Rather, conflicts appear to occur now based much more on localized and transient grievances, or in certain cases where a major power feels the need to act unilaterally to accomplish some set of strategic aims.

This capstone course will treat all forms of conflict as our object of study, and will ask the following question: what types of conflict are we likely to see in the twenty-first century, and what patterns might we discern from these conflicts? No longer confined to interstate war, conflict since the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union has ranged from superpower engaged in major conflict among states to civil war and intrastate violence. Moreover, states no longer hold the monopoly of violence. Indeed, in the last 15 years conflict has entered into areas previously thought unimaginable, such as in cyberspace.  

Course objectives:

During the course of this semester, students will be exposed to a wide range of thinking on the nature of conflict after the Cold War. Beginning with a specific focus on the changing “American way of war” since 9/11, the course moves to a broader interpretation of conflict since the end of the superpower confrontation that characterized the Cold War. The course ends with a reflection on the United Nations as the arbiter of international security, its successes and failings, and its changing role in the decades since the end of the Cold War.

Readings:

There is no required textbook for this course. Rather, each week has a series of readings assigned that are to be read before the class meets on Tuesday. Befitting a once-a-week capstone course, the readings are more extensive but still manageable. The average reading load per week is ~100 pages.

Recommended Reading:

  • Richard K. Betts, Conflict after the Cold War (4th Edition). Prentice Hall, 2012.

Assignments and grading

Your course grade will consist of a paper grade and a discussion/participation grade. A breakdown of the requirements and expectations for each category is below.

Paper: 80%

As this class is a capstone course, the bulk of the grade for the course will consist of a capstone original research paper. Fulfillment of this writing requirement will entail completing a paper of approximately 7,500-8,000 words (approximately 20-25 pages double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman font). Such a paper should be a thorough treatment of the topic chosen, including a clear thesis statement, logical consistency in the arguments used to show the validity of the thesis, and a clear and concise conclusion that effectively summarizes your argument. It should be appropriately documented with references and citations, and should stand on its own as an individual work of scholarship.

Soon after the beginning of the semester, I will meet with each of you individually to discuss your choice of paper topic and your approach chosen to address it. The paper will comprise the majority of the total grade for the course, but attendance and a presentation of your research count for grades as well.

The paper is divided into the following sections:

a)     

Research proposal: Worth 10% of overall grade


b)    Abstract, outline, and list of references: Worth 10% of overall grade.


c)     First draft of paper: Worth 20% of overall grade.

d)    Oral presentation to the group
: Worth 20% of overall grade

e)    Final draft of paper: Worth 20% of overall grade.


 

Discussion Leading / Participation / Discussion Questions: 20%

 


Class discussion in a capstone seminar is more than expected; it is a given. Everyone has his or her own style of discussion, and I do not expect to turn those who prefer not to speak often in class into debate champions. Nevertheless, I do expect that each of you will at some point in the semester lead a course discussion on the topic of your choosing. You will have your classmates’ questions to serve as a point of departure (see below), which you may use as you wish. There will be a sign-up sheet distributed at the first and second class sessions for you to sign up to lead a discussion. Discussion leaders are responsible for generating five questions on the readings to distribute to class via Canvas. The discussion leadership and general course participation will comprise 10% of your course grade.



Because this is a capstone course, it is expected that you will have already absorbed the importance of class attendance. I strongly encourage you to attend every class and be prepared for lively and stimulating discussion. To that end, I will require that each of you prepare one discussion question for the upcoming class to submit to the discussion leader. These should be drawn from the readings and should reflect any questions, comments, or cries of outrage you may have regarding the arguments set forth by the authors. These discussion questions will not be graded individually, but together will count for 10% of your course grade. They most definitely will help you get the most from the class. I will prepare the first set of discussion questions as a template for future assignments. 

Flags:

Independent Inquiry

Writing

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40261 • Mosser, Michael W
Meets TH 330pm-630pm GAR 0.128
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This course is restricted to IRG majors. For IRG program information please contact Dr. Michael Anderson, Director.

The concluding, capstone seminar for the International Relations & Global Studies major is designed to give you an opportunity to draw on your program of studies to prepare a rigorous analysis of a specific aspect of contemporary world affairs.  You have the choice of two formats.  One is a tightly organized research paper; the other is structured as a policy paper directed at a senior decision-maker in a national government or international organization. 

It is profitable to all to set a number of themes for the seminar.  That enhances exchanges and allows for collaborative projects. Still, students will be given reasonable latitude in selecting topics that interest them and/or on which they have acquired specialized knowledge.  We will examine closely the nature of the policy paper and its organization as the semester progresses.  The seminar paper – in either format -  should be viewed as representative of your abilities at this stage in your career and, as such, an effective way of presenting yourself and your abilities.

 The following is a short list of possible themes: democracy promotion as an instrument of foreign policy; the strains among three standards to assess global economic interdependence: growth, equity and stability; the ethical dimensions of the use of force; the interplay of domestic politics and foreign policy process/substance.

IRG 678HA • Honors Tutorial Course

40265 • Anderson, Michael R.
Meets T 330pm-630pm MEZ 2.102
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IRG 678 HA – Fall 2014

 

Course Description:

  

IRG 678HA is the first semester of a two-semester sequence designed for students admitted to the International Relations and Global Studies honors program. The class is designed to prepare selected senior IRG majors to undertake an honors thesis and to complete it within an academic year. The class format of IRG 678HA consists of a weekly workshop in which participants discuss relevant topics concerning the researching and writing of a substantial and original piece of work (i.e. 50-60 pages) related to one of the IRG major’s four subject tracks: International Security; International Political Economy; Science, Technology and the Environment; and Culture, Media, and the Arts. The incorporation of previous coursework in multiple disciplines, study-abroad experience, and foreign-language sources is strongly encouraged.   

 

As instructor of record in the IRG honors program tutorial sequence, Dr. Anderson has agreed to act as supervisor for all IRG honors theses. Students in IRG 678HA/HB, however, are strongly encouraged to find another instructor at the University of Texas willing to serve as a second reader of the thesis.

 

Required Text: 

 

Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (Chicago, 8th edition, 2013).

 

All other readings will be posted on Blackboard and announced in advance of class.

 

Grading Breakdown:

 

Student grades will be based on:

 

1)    Faithful attendance and participation at all class sessions (30 percent)

2)    Completion of weekly reading/writing assignments (30 percent)

3)    Completion of a working outline, literature review, and project schedule for Spring 2014 (40 percent)

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