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Larry D. Carver, Director CLA 2.104, Mailcode G6210, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3458

Course Descriptions

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

30240 • Carver, Larry D
Meets M 400pm-530pm WEL 2.246
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Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past

30245 • Casey, Julie C
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SZB 286
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“Reacting to the Past” seeks to introduce students to major ideas and texts.  It uses role-playing to replicate the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance.  During this semester, students will play three games:  “The Threshold of Democracy:  Athens in 403 B.C.”; “Confucianism and the Succession Crisis of the Wan-li Emperor, 1587 A.D.”; and “Rousseau, Burke, and the Revolution in France, 1791.”  Students will be assigned different roles-e.g. Thrasybulus, a radical Democrat, Oligarch, Supporter of Socrates, Rich Athlete--derived from the historical setting, each role being defined largely by its game objective-exonerate Socrates, banish Socrates, condemn him to death.  Students will determine on their own, however, how best to attain their goals, though they will receive guidance from important texts in the history of ideas, for example The Republic and the speeches of Pericles in “The Threshold of Democracy” game.  

 For the first few sessions of each game, we will provide guidance on the issues and historical context on which the game will turn.  Early in the third session of each game, the class will break into factions, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives.  By the fourth or fifth session, the class will again meet as one.  Students in their roles will run the class.  We will serve as the Game Masters, intruding to resolve technical issues concerning the operation of the game or in other rare circumstances.  

 The heart of each game is persuasion.  For nearly every role to which you will be assigned, you must persuade others that your views make more sense than those of your opponents.  Your views will be informed by the texts cited in your game objectives, and the more you draw upon these texts and the more cleverly you draw upon them, the better.  You have two ways of expressing your views:  orally and in writing.  Both will be graded.

Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France (Oxford); Carnes, Confucianism and the Succession Crisis of the Wan-Li Emperor, 1587; The Threshold of Democracy Athens in 403 B.C.; Rousseau, Burke and Revolution in France, 1791; Confucius, The Analects (Penguin); Hacker, Rules for Writers (Bedford/St. Martin's); Plato, The Republic (Penguin); Rousseau, The Social Contract and The First and Second Discourses (Yale)

Your grade will be based on the following:  (1) regular class attendance, careful preparation of the readings, and active participation in the games; 40% (2) approximately six writing assignments- speeches, newspaper articles, poems, or whatever written expression that enables you to persuade your fellow students - totaling about thirty pages; 60%.   Timely submission of all work is essential.  A beautifully crafted defense of Socrates does him no good if he has already sipped the hemlock.

LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past

30250 • Casey, Julie C
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SZB 286
show description

“Reacting to the Past” seeks to introduce students to major ideas and texts.  It uses role-playing to replicate the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance.  During this semester, students will play three games:  “The Threshold of Democracy:  Athens in 403 B.C.”; “Confucianism and the Succession Crisis of the Wan-li Emperor, 1587 A.D.”; and “Rousseau, Burke, and the Revolution in France, 1791.”  Students will be assigned different roles-e.g. Thrasybulus, a radical Democrat, Oligarch, Supporter of Socrates, Rich Athlete--derived from the historical setting, each role being defined largely by its game objective-exonerate Socrates, banish Socrates, condemn him to death.  Students will determine on their own, however, how best to attain their goals, though they will receive guidance from important texts in the history of ideas, for example The Republic and the speeches of Pericles in “The Threshold of Democracy” game.  

 For the first few sessions of each game, we will provide guidance on the issues and historical context on which the game will turn.  Early in the third session of each game, the class will break into factions, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives.  By the fourth or fifth session, the class will again meet as one.  Students in their roles will run the class.  We will serve as the Game Masters, intruding to resolve technical issues concerning the operation of the game or in other rare circumstances.  

 The heart of each game is persuasion.  For nearly every role to which you will be assigned, you must persuade others that your views make more sense than those of your opponents.  Your views will be informed by the texts cited in your game objectives, and the more you draw upon these texts and the more cleverly you draw upon them, the better.  You have two ways of expressing your views:  orally and in writing.  Both will be graded.

Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France (Oxford); Carnes, Confucianism and the Succession Crisis of the Wan-Li Emperor, 1587; The Threshold of Democracy Athens in 403 B.C.; Rousseau, Burke and Revolution in France, 1791; Confucius, The Analects (Penguin); Hacker, Rules for Writers (Bedford/St. Martin's); Plato, The Republic (Penguin); Rousseau, The Social Contract and The First and Second Discourses (Yale)

Your grade will be based on the following:  (1) regular class attendance, careful preparation of the readings, and active participation in the games; 40% (2) approximately six writing assignments- speeches, newspaper articles, poems, or whatever written expression that enables you to persuade your fellow students - totaling about thirty pages; 60%.   Timely submission of all work is essential.  A beautifully crafted defense of Socrates does him no good if he has already sipped the hemlock.

LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past

30252 • Lang, Elon
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 0.128
show description

“Reacting to the Past” seeks to introduce students to major ideas and texts.  It uses role-playing to replicate the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance.  During this semester, students will play three games:  “The Threshold of Democracy:  Athens in 403 B.C.”; “Confucianism and the Succession Crisis of the Wan-li Emperor, 1587 A.D.”; and “Rousseau, Burke, and the Revolution in France, 1791.”  Students will be assigned different roles-e.g. Thrasybulus, a radical Democrat, Oligarch, Supporter of Socrates, Rich Athlete--derived from the historical setting, each role being defined largely by its game objective-exonerate Socrates, banish Socrates, condemn him to death.  Students will determine on their own, however, how best to attain their goals, though they will receive guidance from important texts in the history of ideas, for example The Republic and the speeches of Pericles in “The Threshold of Democracy” game.  

 For the first few sessions of each game, we will provide guidance on the issues and historical context on which the game will turn.  Early in the third session of each game, the class will break into factions, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives.  By the fourth or fifth session, the class will again meet as one.  Students in their roles will run the class.  We will serve as the Game Masters, intruding to resolve technical issues concerning the operation of the game or in other rare circumstances.  

 The heart of each game is persuasion.  For nearly every role to which you will be assigned, you must persuade others that your views make more sense than those of your opponents.  Your views will be informed by the texts cited in your game objectives, and the more you draw upon these texts and the more cleverly you draw upon them, the better.  You have two ways of expressing your views:  orally and in writing.  Both will be graded.

Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France (Oxford); Carnes, Confucianism and the Succession Crisis of the Wan-Li Emperor, 1587; The Threshold of Democracy Athens in 403 B.C.; Rousseau, Burke and Revolution in France, 1791; Confucius, The Analects (Penguin); Hacker, Rules for Writers (Bedford/St. Martin's); Plato, The Republic (Penguin); Rousseau, The Social Contract and The First and Second Discourses (Yale)

Your grade will be based on the following:  (1) regular class attendance, careful preparation of the readings, and active participation in the games; 40% (2) approximately six writing assignments- speeches, newspaper articles, poems, or whatever written expression that enables you to persuade your fellow students - totaling about thirty pages; 60%.   Timely submission of all work is essential.  A beautifully crafted defense of Socrates does him no good if he has already sipped the hemlock.

LAH 350 • Am Lit, Cul, And The Civil War

30253 • Hutchison, Coleman
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 200
(also listed as E 350R)
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Instructor:  Hutchison, C

Unique #:  35850

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  English Honors

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In the nearly 150 years since the defeat of the Confederate States of America more than 60,000 books and pamphlets about the American Civil War have been published. (To put this staggering figure in context, that is a publication rate of nearly one book per day every day since the cessation of hostilities.) For many, this persistent interest in the war speaks to the continued relevance of the issues raised by, and addressed in, America’s “great internecine conflict”: slavery, race, regional identity, political sovereignty, federalism, &c.  Several cultural historians have gone so far as to suggest that the Civil War is still being fought—not on the battlefields of Chickamauga, Manassas, or Antietam, but on the battlefield of American cultural memory. This course will consider the American Civil War (1861-1865) not in terms of its military or political history but in relation to the ways literary and cultural texts have remembered and rewritten it. Our discussion will focus on five periods of American cultural memory: the immediate postwar period (i.e., 1865-1867), the 1890s, 1930s, 1960s, and 1990s.  How did subsequent generations narrate the causes and effects of the war? How do contemporary events affect the way a given generation reads and rewrites the war? What agendas are being brought to bear on representations of this fierce and bloody conflict?

Required Texts:

Books

Alexander Gardner, Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book of the Civil War (Dover [1866]), ISBN: 978-0486227313

Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage and Other Stories (Penguin [1895]), ISBN: 978-0143039358

William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom! (Vintage [1936]), ISBN: 978-0679732181

Robert Penn Warren, The Legacy of the Civil War (Bison/Nebraska [1961]), ISBN: 978-0803298019

Tony Horwitz, Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War (Pantheon, 1998),

ISBN: 978-0679758334

Natasha Trethewey, Native Guard (Houghton Mifflin, 2006), ISBN: 978-0618872657

Required film viewings:

Victor Fleming, David O. Selznick, et al, Gone with the Wind (MGM, 1939)

Matt Stone and Trey Parker, South Park, “The Red Badge of Gayness” (Comedy Central, 1999)

Kevin Willmott, CSA: The Confederate States of America (IFC, 2004)

In addition, there is a coursepack (CP) of required primary and secondary materials, including poetry by Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Frances E.W. Harper, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Robert Penn Warren, Robert Lowell, and Derek Walcott; short fiction by Silas Weir Mitchell, Flannery O’Connor, and George Saunders; essays by Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington; and songs by Bob Dylan and The Band.

All books are available at the Co-Op, 2246 Guadalupe; the coursepack is available at Jenn’s Copy & Binding, 2200 Guadalupe.

Requirements & Grading: Students will be evaluated on the basis of several short essays (3-4 pages), in-class participation, and a final research project.

Essays: 40%; Participation (i.e., attendance, in-class and electronic discussion): 20%; Final research project: 40%.

LAH 350 • Amer Tech/Victory Cold War

30255 • Mark, Hans
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CRD 007A
(also listed as T C 325)
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Instructor: Hans Mark, John J. McKetta Centennial Energy Chair in Engineering, Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Cockrell School of Engineering

 

Description:

A good case can be made that one of the vital factors in bringing about the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, and the communist ideology on which it was based, was the consistent superiority of American technology for the forty-six year duration of the “Cold War”. It is the purpose of this course to examine this proposition. Many of these technologies had their origins during World War II when they were developed on a “crash” basis because of the exigencies of war. The institutions that developed these technologies were then converted to new work of a military nature that turned out to be important during the Cold War. Thus, the course will start with a discussion of the situation as World War II ended in the summer of 1945.

A number of examples of American technological developments will be presented, and the effect that they had on Soviet-American relations will be evaluated. One of the first was the Berlin Airlift, which broke the Soviet blockade of the city in 1949. We astonished the Soviets with our technological capability to supply a city of three million people with aircraft alone. It was the first “peaceful victory” in the Cold War. Next was the use of U-2 aircraft to gather credible information about the deployment of Soviet missiles in Cuba. The high-resolution U-2 pictures permitted President Kennedy to persuade a skeptical public that the Soviets were indeed doing just that. The development of the technology for defense against ballistic missiles was another important element. President Reagan’s refusal to trade away the work on missile defense at the Reikjavik summit meeting with President Gorbachev in 1986 was one of the critical turning points in U.S.-Soviet relations during the Cold War. The meeting persuaded Gorbachev that we were serious, and some believe he lost his nerve at that point. Gorbachev himself has actually said so. The continuing work on cryptology and other information systems were also a decisive element in winning the Cold War. This work was an extension of what was started in World War II and profoundly influenced computer development. Perhaps even more important, the unclassified work on information technology, transistor radios, Xerox machines, FAX machines and VCR technology made it impossible for the Soviets to operate the closed society that the communist philosophy demanded. The lectures will be presented roughly in chronological order of events during the Cold War. There will also be some discussions of how the legacy of the Cold War affects current events.

 

Text/Readings:

Course packet of articles about the Cold War

Supplemental readings for term paper (guided by the professor)

 

Requirements

The course consists of twenty-four lecture sessions supported by video presentations. There will be a mid-term and a required term paper. The students’ grades will be determined by their performance on these assignments.

 

LAH 350 • Boundaries And Dilemmas-Honors

30257 • Ekland-Olson, Sheldon
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.302D
(also listed as SOC 352D)
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This is a research and writing course designed to explore moral imperatives, violation of these imperatives, and perhaps most interestingly how we justify such violation. 

 Why is the title of the course Boundaries and Dilemmas? A good deal of the semester will be spent on how communities establish boundaries to determine lives more or less worthy  of protection and support than others. We will also spend time on how communities weigh one imperative against another when confronted with moral dilemmas.

  The first portion of the course will offer quick overviews of specific questions. With these overviews in hand, you will be asked to choose a specific topic, such as physician assisted suicide, capital punishment, eugenics, or war. You will be asked to develop a set of ideas consistent with the general framework developed in the early sessions of class. You and I will meet one-on-one to discuss your ideas. You will then be asked to make a 15 (or so) minute presentation to the class. 

 I consider the material we cover to be very important. The assigned paper will be graded with high standards, as will the class presentation. Both will require substantial work. You will love it! 

There is one assigned book:  WHO LIVES, WHO DIES, WHO DECIDES.

I see class discussions as very important to the success of this class.

 0% of your grade will come from class participation, primarily from postings on Discussion Board. Attendance is required. More than three absences will lower your grade one full point -- A to B, B to C etc. I know this is tough, but so am I.... Never fear, I will make every effort to ensure classes are worth attending.

 This course is designed to hone various communication skills. Individually, you will be asked to write a 16-20 page paper on a topic of your choice. This paper will be handed in for initial grading and editorial comment. Your grade on the initial draft will constitute 40% of your final grade. The paper will be handed back to you for revision. You will be asked to hand in the revised version at the end of the semester. This final version of the paper will be graded and will also constitute 40% of your grade.

 I look forward to many lively and fruitful discussions throughout the semester.

LAH 350 • British Hist, Lit, And Polits

30260 • Louis, Wm. Roger
Meets F 300pm-400pm HRC 3.204
(also listed as HIS 366N, T C 325)
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This seminar is designed as a reading course in history, literature, and politics, and as a class in professional writing. Its scope will include not only the literature, history, and politics of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, but also the interaction of British and other societies throughout the world. One point of emphasis will be the history of the British Empire and Commonwealth in its Asian and African as well as early American dimensions. Another point will be a focus on historical, literary, and auto-biography (Disreali, Woolf, Lawrence, Orwell, Gandhi, etc.).

In a general way, the seminar upholds the principles of the Modern History Faculty at Oxford-to enhance (1) intellectual curiosity, (2) conceptual clarity; (3) flexibility, that is, the capacity to engage with alternative perspectives and new information; (4) accuracy and attention to detail; (5) critical engagement; (6) capacity for hard work (7) enthusiasm for history, literature, and politics; and (8) historical imagination and understanding, that is the ability to speculate and compare, alongside the possession of appropriate historical knowledge and the capacity to deploy it.

Texts:

Lytton Strachey's Eminent Victorians is required, then a choice of five other books from the list below plus six others to be decided upon in consultation with the instructor:

Robert Blake, Disraeli

Michael Holroyd, Lytton Strachey

Hermione Lee, Virginia Woolf

T. E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom

Bernard Crick, George Orwell: A Life

Judith M. Brown, Gandhi: Prisoner of Hope

LAH 350 • Cannibal Renaissance

30265 • Wojciehowski, Hannah C
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CAL 221
(also listed as E 350E)
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Instructor:  Wojciehowski, H

Unique #:  35830

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  English Honors

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Early modern European narratives reporting on the so-called New World and its inhabitants provide strange and fascinating glimpses of cross-cultural encounters. Represented in these writings are conflicting beliefs and fantasies about the world and its diverse peoples; these would have a profound impact on virtually every culture around the globe, as our own modern world came into being.  In this course we will study several important 15th- and 16th-century accounts of travel, encounter, conquest, in order to understand how the creative phenomenon called the Renaissance was closely tied to the global circulation and redistribution of material goods, knowledge and ideas; the enforced labor or enslavement of large groups of people; and genocide.

In this course will focus on one particular fantasy and reality that runs through numerous European travel narratives of this time period:  namely, the cannibal.  How did tales of New World cannibalism shape Europeans’ views of the terra incognita to the west, and how were such tales used to justify colonialism?  How did American natives receive and react to the fantasies that were projected onto them during the early colonial era?  How did imagined and real acts cannibalism, some performed by Europeans, shape their views of themselves? What was the phenomenon that I call “the cannibal imagination,” and why does it persist even day?  These are some of the primary questions to be considered in this Honors Seminar.

Our reading selections include a remarkable early piece of North American (and, loosely speaking, Texan) literature: Cabeza de Vaca’s Relation; Léry’s ambivalent account of his visits with cannibal tribes of Brazil; Staden’s hair-raising story of being held in captivity and his near-cannibalization; the De Bry family’s visual narratives of New World natives, including cannibal tribes (a precursor to graphic novels—and I do mean graphic); and Shakespeare’s The Tempest, anearly 17th-century homage to the cannibal on the eve of his disappearance.

Students in this course will be asked to contribute a paragraph responding to the readings for each class on the group’s discussion board, a 5-6 page interpretive essay, a 10-12 page research paper, and two oral reports.  They will also be asked to make use of the extensive collections of early modern books at the HRC and Benson libraries.  Two class visits will be held in those collections.

About languages:  Many of the texts in this course were not originally written in English.  Students who know other European languages will be encouraged to read these works in the original, though I will order top English translations.

About the workload:  There is one.

Primary Texts: Columbus, Diary of the First Voyage; Chanca, Letter from the Second Voyage; Vespucci, The New World; Four Voyages; Las Casas, Brief History of the Destruction of the Indies; Cabeza de Vaca, Relation; Léry, History of a Voyage to the Land of Brasil; Staden, True History of his Captivity; Montaigne, “Of Cannibals”; De Bry, Grands Voyages; Raleigh, Discoverie of the Large, Rich, and Bewtiful Empyre of Guiana; Hakluyt, Voyages (excerpts); Shakespeare, The Tempest.

Plus a packet of historical and analytical companion readings on the history and literature of cannibalism, including excerpts from the following: C. Levi-Strauss, The Savage Mind; W. Arens, The Man-Eating Myth; F. Lestringant, Cannibals; S. Greenblatt, Learning to Curse; S. Greenblatt, ed., New World Encounters; S. Wilson, Archaeology of the Caribbean; M. Kilgore, From Communion to Cannibalism; H. Wojciehowski, Group Identity in the Renaissance World.

Filmic component: “Cabeza de Vaca” (1991) dir. Nicolás Echevarría; “Even the Rain” (2010) dir. Icíar Bollaín; “How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman” (1971), dir. Nelson Pereira dos Santos; “Quilombo” (1974), dir. Carlos Diegues; “The Tempest” (2010), dir. Julie Taymor; plus the added bonus film “Avatar” (2009), dir. James Cameron.

Assignments & Grading Structure: Daily discussion board, 25%; 5-6 page essay, 15%; First oral report, 10%; Second oral report, 10%; Research paper, 25%; Quizzes and participation, 15%.

LAH 350 • David Foster Wallace

30270 • Houser, Heather
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CBA 4.342
(also listed as E 349S)
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Instructor:  Houser, H

Unique #:  35800

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  English Honors

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course covers the truncated career of David Foster Wallace (1962-2008), one of the most obsessed-over and lauded authors of his generation. We will read some of Wallace's essays and short stories, and all of Infinite Jest. The following questions will motivate the course: 1. What is Wallace's place in US literary history? What is his project for a new fiction? 2. What are his polemics about 20th-century US culture and media forms? Can particular novels and reading practices intervene in these domains? 3. How can fiction enter and change our lives?

We will avail ourselves of the Harry Ransom Center's rich Wallace archive which includes his manuscripts, letters, and personal library. The course culminates in a final project of the student's own design. Students are encouraged to use HRC resources in developing their project questions but are not required to do so.

Texts: Infinite Jest, and selections from Broom of the System, A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men, Consider the Lobster, Oblivion, Girl with Curious Hair, and The Pale King.

Requirements & Grading: 15% participation (including discussion leading), 10% blog posts, 30% 2 short essays, 5% project proposal, 30% final project, 10% project presentation.

LAH 350 • Drama In The Archives

30275 • Lang, Elon
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 0.122
(also listed as HMN 350)
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Have you ever wondered how a play or film might have turned out differently? Dramatic performance is by nature ephemeral—years of planning and preparation culminate in just short hours of activity shared between actors and audience. Even when the performance results in a film that can be replayed, its production process is hidden from the audience’s view.  Yet it leaves significant traces: scripts, drafts, notes, drawings, photos, playbills, reviews, correspondence, recordings, costumes, criticism, editions, and more. For some of the greatest dramatists and filmmakers in history, tracing such material leads to our very own Harry Ransom Center on the UT campus.

 In this class, students will explore related questions: What can we learn about a drama from its archival record? What changes have occurred in the course of a drama’s development and through its production history? Students will study samples from the Ransom Center’s strong holdings in modern and contemporary Anglophone drama, plus some Shakespeare. (We might include different versions of King Lear in the first seventeenth-century editions of the text; Modern/Contemporary works might include those of Arthur Miller, David Mamet, Tennessee Williams, George Bernard Shaw, Samuel Beckett, Tom Stoppard, David O. Selznick, and Robert DeNiro.) While learning archival research methods, students will train their analytical senses to notice plays’ character development ambiguities and implicit nuances of plot and cultural commentary. They will explore further complexities by examining records of playwrights, actors, producers, costume companies, designers, film directors, etc. in the archives at the Ransom Center.

Objectives:

Beyond gaining familiarity with several significant examples of Anglophone drama and the cultural contexts in which their creators were situated, students will learn about the impact the study of textual variation, publication history,production history, and archival research can have on literary, theater, or film history arguments. Students will work to sharpen their analytical writing and scholarly research skills through several targeted close reading exercises describing and comparing primary sources and surveys of published secondary critical and historical research material. Students will gain skills in the study of Shakespeare and modern/contemporary English-language playwrights, screenwriters, actors, and participants in productions. They will also gain familiarity with how to go about pursuing archival research through practical examples presented in class and at the HRC, and through an independent final research project focused on an item or small group of items held there.

 Class Format and Selected Readings:

 For the first 4 weeks, students will become oriented toward scholarly research in the Harry Ransom Center and University Libraries, while reading examples of archival research and essays on topics related to archival research practices and goals in theater, literature, and film. The first subject we’ll analyze will be Shakespeare, since his works transcend boundaries between humanities disciplines. Students will become familiar with the range of materials the HRC houses and all sorts of drama by viewing examples of seventeenth-century printed editions of plays, costume designs from the 19th and 20th centuries and adaptations by other writers (both published and unpublished). The first two essays will be due during this period.

 In the next 6-8 weeks readings will be from the works of modern and contemporary dramatists who are featured prominently in the Ransom Center. Each 3-4 class periods, the class will read one play, learn about the author and its production history, and peruse materials at the Ransom Center as selected by the instructor. Students will sign up to develop and present their third and fourth essays on some of these materials.

 During the final 3-5 weeks of the course, students will develop and write their final research projects. Full class meetings will be reduced to once-per-week or fewer to allow students more time to work in the HRC and set up meetings with the instructor.

Readings and viewings of modern/contemporary works may be drawn from:

David Mamet, e.g. Oleanna, which underwent significant changes after its initial performances to make its social criticism more ambiguous)

Arthur Miller, e.g. The Crucible, Death of a Salesman

Tennessee Williams, e.g. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Glass Menagerie, Streetcar Named Desire (which all started off with really terrible titles)

Samuel Beckett, e.g. Waiting for Godot

Tom Stoppard, e.g. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

G.B. Shaw, e.g. Pygmalion

Robert DeNiro, e.g. A Bronx Tale, Goodfellas, The Deer Hunter

 Essays/Chapters in:

Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare on Stage

Performing Shakespeare’s Tragedies Today

Research Methods in Theatre and Performance, ed. Baz Kershaw, 2011

Understanding Archives and Manuscripts, by James M. O’Toole and Richard J. Cox, 2006

Documentation, Disappearance, and the Representation of Live Performance, by Matthew Reason, 2006

Online resources:  HRC sites

http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/collections/guide/american/

http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/collections/guide/british/

http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/collections/guide/performing/

http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/collections/guide/film/

  Archival Research Methods:

http://www2.archivists.org/usingarchives

http://www.archives.gov/research/alic/reference/archives-resources/terminology.html

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/988/01/

 Assignments and Grading:

 Class participation, regular meetings with instructor, presentation of work to class         5%

Essay #1: Comparative close reading of two versions of a Shakespeare text                  15%

Essay #2: Study of an historical production (or film) of a Shakespeare play                      15%

Essay #3: Response to a scholarly essay on a modern/contemporary play/film                15%

Essay #4: Analysis of potential vs. made choices in a performance or production           15%

Research Project:                                                                                                                      35%

Discovery and description of an item(s) in the HRC that allow you to make a claim about the interpretation of the work in the context of its production and/or documentary history and why it is significant for the analysis of the work, its dramatists, actors, and history.

 

LAH 350 • The Face Of Justice-Honors

30280 • Smith, Bea Ann
Meets M 300pm-600pm CAL 200
(also listed as GOV 357M, WGS 345)
show description

Course Description:

 

In our democracy, justice concerns certain inalienable rights: liberty, due process, equality. And it concerns freedom from governmental intrusion on the right to speak, to assemble, to be secure in our homes, to practice or not practice any religion we choose.  Certainly justice includes some notion of fairness. These fundamental values are expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights. The Face of Justice reflects the individuals whose rights are being protected (and those whose rights are being overlooked) by our operating system of justice at given time.

 

Flags:

 

Writing

Cultural Diversity

Ethics and Leadership

 

Texts:

 

Our readings and our discussions will include historical documents, legal opinions, speeches, biographical materials—and of course the Bill of Rights, the Declaration of Independence, and certain sections of the Constitution. We will have a number of guest lecturers throughout the semester.“We the People” by Professor Penny White, University of Tennessee College of Law. Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights (Amendments 1-10), 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19thAmendments (in your written materials)Angela Roddey Holder, The Meaning of the Constitution (2d ed. 987), p.55 Susan Wiltshire, Greece, Rome, and the Bill of Rights (1992) Introduction, pp. 1-6, Chapter 1, pp. 9-29, Chapter 5 pp. 89-100Reread: Declaration of Independence Amendments: 13, 14, 15, 19, 24, 26Selected documents and essays from Our Mothers Before Us, Women and Democracy1789-1920. The Handbook of Texas, Woman Suffrage in Texas, Texas State Historical Society Association, 1997-2002.The Woman Who Ran for President, by Lois Beachy Underhill, Prologue, Chapters 8, 9,11. “Victoria Woodhull through Modern Eyes” by Gloria Steinem. Excerpts from Woodhull & Claflin’s Weekly newspaper “Upward and Onward.”Jane M. Friedman, America’s First Woman Lawyer: The Biography of Myra Bradwell (1993) Chap. 1, 7, 9, 10, Prologue and Epilogue Bradwell v. Illinois, 16 Wall 130 (1873), concurring opinion. Mary Beth Rogers, Barbara Jordan, American Hero (1998) Chap. 6 & 7, Chap. 13 & 15Max Sherman, Barbara Jordan: Speaking the Truth with Eloquent Thunder (2007). The following speeches: Constitutional Basis for Impeachment (1974); Testimony in Opposition to Robert Bork (1987); Remarks by Bill Moyers (1996).

 

Requirements:

 

This is a small class. It will not work unless you read the assignments every week, come to class, and participate in the discussion. Attendance is required. After three unexcused absences, your grade will be reduced by 10% for every absence.10% of the final grade will reflect class participation. This is a writing course. You will write two short papers (3-4 pages) one in September, one in October. I will edit your first draft and return it to you for revision. You will be graded on the revision only. These two papers each represent 20% of your grade. After the middle of the course, you will select a topic (with guidance) for a longer paper (8-10pages). Again, you will submit a draft that I will edit and return to you for revision. The final paper will be due shortly after the end of classes and will constitute 50% of your grade. There will be no final exam.

LAH 350 • Germany In 20th Cen-Honors

30285 • Crew, David
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as HIS 337N, REE 335)
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Course carries three flags: WR, GC, and EL.

Even from our vantage point at the end of this century, the Nazi period is still one of the most dramatic and destructive episodes in western European, indeed, in world history.  Nazism is synonymous with terror, concentration camps and mass murder.  Hitler’s war claimed the lives of tens of millions and left Europe in complete ruins.  The Nazis have therefore given twentieth-century germany a world-historical significane it would otherwise have lacked.  Whether we are looking at the Bismarckian, the Wilhelmine, or the Weimar periods, the central question -- the ‘German Problem’, as it has been termed -- is the same:  why was Germany unable to establish a viable, liberal-democratic and parliamentary society which would have prevented the triumph of Nazism?  The danger here resides in the temptation to view all of German history from about 1871 onwards as merely the pre-history of Nazism, thereby failing to deal with each period on its own terms.  And what about the years after 1945?  With the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945, german history appears to have experienced a radical break.  The hostilities of the Cold War appeared to ensure a permanent division of Germany.  But in the last few years, the dramatic changes in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe have revolutionized East Germany as well.  The Berlin Wall is down, East and West Germany are once again joined together in one nation.  Economic crisis, unemployment, waves of violence and dramatic changes in immigration policy have begun to conjure up the ghosts of the Nazi past.  Even if Germany’s post-war democratic order is not fundamentally threatened, it is still clear that Germany has already begun to follow a quite different path than the one laid out for it after 1945.  Has the nature of the ‘German Problem’ changed fundamentally since 1945, or do recent events suggest that the old questions may once again be relevant?

Mary Fullbrook,The Divided Nation; Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front; Richard Bessel(ed), Life in the Third Reich; Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz, Peter Schneider, The Wall Jumper

This course combines lectures and discussions of secondary readings as well as original historical documents(short selections) and contemporary visual materials such as photographs, newsreels, propaganda and election posters. The course assignments are designed to allow you to think and write about each of these different ways of gaining access to the German past.

There will be no formal mid-term or final exam. The writing requirements are:

(1)Two longer essay assignments (each 6-8 pages typewritten, each worth 30% of your final grade) which ask you to think critically about some of the major issues in twentieth century Germanhistory. The first assignment will deal with the period up to 1939. The second will focus on the period from 1939 to the present. Essay 1 will be due in mid-October. Essay 2 is due no later than the official exam date for this course.

(2)In addition to these two longer essay assignments, you will be asked to write one shorter essay (4-5 pages typewritten-worth 20% of the final grade) on any one of the books by Remarque, Bessel, Levi, or Schneider. This is not a book report. I will hand out specific questions on each of these books which you need to answer in your essays.

(3)Finally, you will be asked to write two  short (2-3 page) analyses of  visual evidence(photographs, propaganda, election posters, etc.) that I will include among the class materials, or  internet sites on twentieth century Germany that you yourself have found(each of these 2 assignments is worth 10% of the final grade).

LAH 350 • Holocaust Aftereffects-Honors

30290 • Bos, Pascale
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 234
(also listed as GSD 360, WGS 340)
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The events of the Holocaust changed Western culture in fundamental ways. Not only was a great part of Jewish culture in Europe destroyed, the circumstances of the Nazi genocide as a modern, highly rationalized, efficient form of mass murder which took place in the heart of civilized Europe changed the conception of the progress of modernity and the Enlightenment in fundamental ways. This course explores the historical, political, psychological, theological, and cultural fall-out, as well as literary and cinematic responses in Europe and the U.S. to these events as they first became known, and as one moved further away from it in time and came to understand its pronounced and often problematic after effects. Central to our inquiry is the realization that the events of the Holocaust have left indelible traces in European and U.S. culture and culture production, of which a closer look (first decade by decade, then moving on to a number of themes and questions), reveals profound insights into current day culture, politics, and society. 

Levi and Rothberg, The Holocaust: Theoretical Readings; Art Spiegelman, Maus I ⅈ Ruth Klüger, Still Alive: a Girlhood Remembered; Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz;  Elie Wiesel, Night; Additional  course packet 

Films: Nuit et Brouillard; Holocaust (excerpts); Shoah (excerpts); Schindler's List (excerpt)

Attendance/participation 15% 

Response papers (2) 10%

Class presentation 10%

Presentation paper 15%

Midterm exam 20%

Final research paper 30% (proposal, bibliography, outline + 1st ¶, 5% each, paper: 15%)

LAH 350 • Leadership And Ethics

30293 • Drumwright, Minette E
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CMA 3.116
(also listed as HMN 350)
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The central purpose of the course is to examine business and the professions in the larger context of society.  Such an examination requires consideration of a multitude of issues ranging from normative philosophical positions to practical day-to-day decision making by managers, professionals, and leaders.  The goal is to raise important questions and issues and to help students think about how to think about them.  The course is neither a course in ethics nor a course in management per se, but it prompts students to approach the issues of business and society in a more integrative and systematic way.  The course should be of interest to a wide range of students, and it does not presume previous courses in ethics or business.

Drumwright, Business Professionals & Society  (these are cases and readings in a course packet)

Class Participation 30%

Two 8-page case write-ups

One 15-page paper (group project)

(papers comprise 70% of final grade)

LAH 350 • Leadership Strategy In Sports

30294 • ROBERTS, DARON K
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CRD 007B
(also listed as T C 325)
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Leadership Strategy In Sports

In February of 2014, Michael Sam, a former outside linebacker for the University of Missouri and SEC Co-Defensive Player of the Year, announced that he was gay.  The announcement did not come as a surprise to his former teammates – Sam had shared his sexual orientation during a fall practice session the previous year – but the news sent shockwaves through the news media.  His declaration was met with both scorn and praise.  With the NFL Draft nearly four months away, would Sam become the first openly gay player in the NFL?

His courage attracted international media attention and drew the support of First Lady Michelle Obama via Twitter: “You’re an inspiration to all of us, @MikeSamFootball.  We couldn’t be prouder of your courage both on and off the field.”  But some NFL players, including Jonathan Vilma, voiced uneasiness about Sam’s reception in the locker-room.  “I think he [Sam] would not be accepted as much as we think he would be accepted,” Vilma cautioned.

The Sam Saga underscores the extent to which sports reflect ideological divides in our culture. In this course, we will frame our discussion of contemporary issues in sports through a historical lens that examines the introduction of athletic contests into American society.  Next, we will use this backdrop to wade through complex social, economic and cultural issues including: compensation of college athletes, use of analytics to inform decision-making, minority representation among players and managers, introduction of openly gay athletes and the health implications of player safety.

Most importantly, we will take on the role of key decision-makers (e.g., athletic directors, head coaches and general managers) and construct our own ethical framework for dealing with these issues in the sports context.

Assignments and Grading Policy:

Grades will be based on the following: (1) regular class attendance, careful preparation of the readings, and active participation in the class; (2) timely submission of all work; (3) a term paper.

Final grades will be calculated using the following formula: (1) short response papers – 35%,  (2) term paper and presentation – 35%, and (3) class participation – 30%. There will be no final examination.

Texts/Readings:

Michael Lewis, Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game (2004)

William Rhoden, 40 Million Dollar Slaves: The Rise, Fall and Redemption of the Black Athlete (2007)

Mark Faninaru-Wade & Steve Fainaru. League of Denial: The NFL, Concussions and the Battle for Truth (2013)

There will also be a course packet comprised of short readings.

About the Instructor:

Daron K. Roberts is a former NFL coach who has been featured in ESPN the Magazine and Sports Illustrated. ‚Äč In the fall of his third year at Harvard Law School, Roberts decided to pursue a career in football coaching and wrote 164 letters to college and professional football teams.  The Kansas City Chiefs offered Roberts a training camp internship for the 2007 season. After completing his internship, he joined the Chiefs in a volunteer capacity and was elevated to the position of assistant coach in 2008.  That experience led to coaching stints with the West Virginia Mountaineers, Kansas City Chiefs, Detroit Lions and Cleveland Browns.

A native of East Texas, Roberts holds a B.A. in Plan II Honors and Government from the University of Texas (2001), an M.P.P. from Harvard Kennedy School (2004) and a J.D. from Harvard Law School (2007). 

During his tenure at the University of Texas, Roberts was elected Student Government President.  At the time, Texas was the largest public university in the United States.  For his leadership, Roberts was awarded the university’s highest distinction – Most Outstanding Student in 2000.

Roberts has been recognized as one of the Harvard Kennedy School’s 75 Most Fascinating Alumni and the World Economic Forum’s Young Global Leaders for cultivating a nonprofit football camp - 4th and 1, Inc.  4th and 1 offers free SAT prep, life skills development and football training to at-risk youth in Michigan, Texas and Florida.  The camp has served over 300 students since 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

LAH 350 • Money In Politics

30300 • Roberts, Brian
Meets T 330pm-630pm CLA 0.122
(also listed as GOV 379S, HMN 350)
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Title:   MONEY IN POLITICS-HONORS

 

Course Description

 

This course explores the nature and consequences of money in American politics and why, at this point in history, we find ourselves embroiled in the most significant debate over campaign finance reform in over thirty years. The debate goes to the heart of the U.S. Constitution, pitting the First Amendment rights of speech and assembly against the perceived fairness and efficacy of a republican government awash, some claim, in increasingly unaccountable money. 

Campaign finance issues lie at the crossroads of a bewildering number of analytical perspectives. We (must) examine the work of historians, social scientists, legal scholars, and interested parties on all sides of the debate in an effort not only to assess current policy debates but also to understand how we got here.

The objective of the course is not to persuade you of any particular point of view but, rather, to arm you with the substantive knowledge, theoretical foundation and analytical tools needed to be resolute in whatever conclusions you draw from this experience.

Course Requirements

 

This course is an honors seminar.  As such, there is a premium on preparation and participation.  Final grades are based on class participation, two tests and two class projects:

 

Participation:   10%

1st Project:     15%

2nd Project:   20%

First Test:      25%

Second Test: 30%

 

Grades will be based on the +/- scale.

 

Texts

 

La Raja, Raymond. Small Change: Money, Political Parties and Campaign Finance Reform. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. 2008.

Lessig, Lawrence. Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress--and a Plan to Stop It. New York: Twelve. 2011.

Samples, John. The Fallacy of Campaign Finance Reform. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 2006.

LAH 350 • Politics In Fiction

30307 • Sparrow, Bartholomew
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 210
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What is at stake in politics and government?  Why do political events unfold as they do?  Why do politicians and public officials make the choices they do?  Theories of politics and government, statistical analyses, and archival research take us so far.  Many say that the best way to capture politics and government—and especially the personal and emotional nature of politics—is through fiction.

 In “Politics and Fiction” students read some of the best fiction writing extant on American politics and government.  The reading list is based on the quality of the texts, rather than on focusing particular authors, addressing particular subjects, or covering particular time periods.  Fortunately, particular topics and time periods do come into play.  The books’ subjects range from accounts of 19th century America, to works on Vietnam and the 1960s, to novels about city and state and national politics and elections, and to contemporary lobbying and radicalism.

 Students are asked to read critically, that is to uncover the assumptions of and perspectives of each text with respect to ideology and partisanship, to consider how politics function and the political system operates, to think about the role played by individual and social psychology, and to assess what the relevant institutions are each case.  What are the political foundations and philosophic premises of the texts?  What is the author’s writing style and the effect of that style on the reader’s understanding of the text?

19th Century

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, IBSN: 1840224023

Gore Vidal, Lincoln, IBSN: 0375708763

Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warren, The Gilded Age.  ISBN: 0452009995

Vietnam and the 1960s

Graham Greene, The Quiet American ISBN: 0140185003

Don DeLillo, Libra ISBN: 014015604

Philip Roth, American Pastoral ISBN: 0375701429

Tim O'Brien, In the Lake of the Woods ISBN: 0140250947

 Local and State Politics

Robert Penn Warren, All the King’s Men ISBN:0156031043

Edwin O’Connor, The Last Hurrah ISBN: 0316626597*

Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place  ISBN:0292708319

 Contemporary Issues

Christopher Buckley, Thank you for Smoking  ISBN: 0812976525

David Goodwillie, American Subversive  ISBN: 1439157065

Students are responsible for composing (2) books reviews, making an in-class presentation, participating in class discussion, and writing short response papers.   

Students need to have taken Government 310L and 312L

 Grades

Book Reviews, two (1500-2000 words): 2 x 15 = 30 percent

Comment Papers, six (500 words maximum): 6 x 5 = 30 percent

Class Participation, including attendance: 30 percent

Presentation/Discussion leadership: 10 percent

LAH 350 • Writing Nonfiction

30315 • Curtis, Gregory B
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as T C 325)
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This is an intensive course in writing with a special emphasis on craft.  The course has been redesigned from a similar course taught in previous semesters.  Students will write profiles, narratives, and essays, some fairly short and others of moderate length.  Instruction and class discussions will concentrate on the fundamental components of nonfiction including beginnings, organization, character development, narrative flow, and conclusions.  The instructor makes extensive comments on all papers.  Readings are devoted to writers working and publishing now or in the very recent past.  Although the writing assignments are demanding, there will be no midterm or final examination. 

The instructor is an experienced editor and a widely published author.

Readings are devoted to writers working and publishing now or in the very recent past.

A Natural State by Stephen Harrigan

A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again by David Foster Wallace

Hooking Up by Tom Wolfe

The Bullfighter Checks Her Makeup by Susan Orlean

Explaining Hitler by Ron Rosenbaum

Sex, Art, and American Culture by Camille Paglia

Eat the Rich by P. J. O’Rourke

Life Stories edited by David Remnick

The Best American Magazine Writing 2000 edited by Clay Felker

Students will be required to write several profiles, essays, and narratives of short and moderate lengths and one longer work.  Although the writing component will be demanding, there will be no mid-term or final examination.  Instead grades will be based on student writing and, to a lesser extent, on response to the readings. 

 

 

LAH 679TA • Honors Thesis

30325
Meets
(also listed as HMN 679HA)
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Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.

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