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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Speakers 2006/2007

Howard Norman - February 16, 2006

Howard Norman’s books are notable for their intensely psychological plots, breathtaking landscapes, and evocative prose. He has twice been named as a finalist for the National Book Award and has received a Lannan Award in Fiction. He lives with his family in Vermont and Washington, D.C.

Alice Notley - March 2, 2006

Paris-based Alice Notley is the author of more than 20 books of poetry. She was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Award for Poetry and of the 2002 Griffin International Poetry Prize. In the spring of 2001 she received an Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the Poetry Society of America’s Shelly Memorial Award. She edited and wrote a new introduction to her late husband Ted Berrigan’s The Sonnets and The Collected Poems of Ted Berrigan.
Leading a peripatetic life during the late 60s and early 70s, she settled in New York, where, for 16 years, she was an important force in the eclectic second generation of the so-called New York school of poetry.


Poets Corinne Lee and Hoa Nguyen - April 20, 2006

Corinne Lee was winner of the 2004 National Poetry Series competition for her book PYX (Penguin). Her poems have been published in dozens of online and print literary magazines. Ms. Lee has been a multiple nominee for the Pushcart Prize. She was educated at the Iowa Writer’s workshop and the Radcliffe Publishing Institute. She lives in Central Texas with her husband and children.

Born near Saigon in 1967, Hoa Nguyen grew up in the D.C. area and studied poetry at New College in San Francisco. She lives in Austin, Texas with the poet Dale Smith; they publish Skanky Possum, a poetry book imprint, and curate a reading series. Her books include Your Ancient See Through (Sub Press) and Red Juice (Effing).

Joynes Event: Barry Lopez
April 23, 2007
National Book Award prize winner

In his nonfiction, Mr. Lopez writes often about the relationship between the physical landscape and human culture. In his fiction, he frequently addresses issues of intimacy, ethics, and identity. He is the author of Arctic Dreams, for which he received the National Book Award, Of Wolves and Men, a National Book Award finalist for which he received the John Burroughs and Christopher medals, and eight works of fiction, including Light Action in the Caribbean, Field Notes, and Resistance. His essays are collected in two books, Crossing Open Ground and About This Life.

He contributes regularly to Granta, The Georgia Review, Orion, Outside, The Paris Review, Manoa and other publications in the United States and abroad. His work appears in dozens of anthologies, including Best American Essays, Best Spiritual Writing, and collections from National Geographic, Outside, The Georgia Review, The Paris Review, and other periodicals.

Informal gathering, Yale Professor Wai Chee Dimock

April 10, 2007

Through Other Continents is a reexamination of American literature through the lens of world history and global culture. This is a critically acclaimed book by a renowned scholar. Honors Students are invited

March 22, 2007

Mary Karr

Karr will read from recent works. Karr's first memoir, The Liars' Club, won the PEN Martha Albrand Award for best first nonfiction and was a finalist for The National Book Critics Circle Award. It was on The New York Times bestseller list for more than a year and a "best book" for more than thirty newspapers and magazines. The sequel, Cherry, about her adolescence, was also a bestseller for The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Houston Chronicle. It was a "best book" for those periodicals and The New Yorker, where it was excerpted. Karr's two memoirs are credited with sparking the explosion in that genre.

Karr's grants include The Whiting Writer's Award, an NEA, a Radcliffe Bunting Fellowship, and a Guggenheim. Her work appears in such magazines as The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Poetry, and Parnassus. She is the Jesse Truesdell Peck Professor of Literature at Syracuse University. She contributes to magazines such as The New Yorker and Atlantic Monthly.

November 30, 2006

Joynes Events: Barbara Ras

Award-Winning Poet

Her first book of poems, Bite Every Sorrow, was chosen by C.K. Williams to receive the 1997 Walt Whitman Award and subsequently won the Georgia Author of the Year Award for poetry. Her work has appared in many magazines and anthologies, including Boulevard, Massachusetts Review, Prairie Schooner, and American Scholar. She has received the Ascher Montandon Award, the Kate Tufts Discovery Award, and honors from the National Writers Union, Villa Montalvo, San Jose Poetry Center, Spoon River Poetry Review, and others. She has traveled extensively in Latin America and lived for periods of time in Colombia and Costa Rica, and in 1994 she edited a collection of Costa Rican fiction in translation entitled Costa Rica: A Traveler's Literary Companion. She is currently Director of the Trinity University Press in San Antonio. Her new book, One Hidden Stuff, is forthcoming from Penguin.

November 2, 2006

Lawrence Wright

Author and Magazine Journalist: Lawrence Wright

Best-selling author and magazine journalist Lawrence Wright discusses his new book on Al-Qaeda.
Wright has published six books. City Children, Country Summer (Scribner's, 1979), In the New World: Growing Up with America, 1960 - 1984 (Knopf, 1988), Saints and Sinners (Knopf, 1993), Remembering Satan (Knopf, 1994), Twins: Genes, Environment, and the Mystery of Identity (Weidenfeld and Nicholson, 1997; Wiley and Sons, 1998), and God's Favorite (Simon and Schuster, 2000).

His history of Al Qaeda, The Looming Tower, will be published by Knopf in August. A portion of that book, "The Man Behind Bin Laden," was published in The New Yorker and won the 2002 Overseas Press Club's Ed Cunningham Award for best magazine reporting. He has also won the National Magazine Award for Reporting as well as the John Bartlow Martin Award for Public Interest Magazine Journalism.

Wright is the co- writer (with Ed Zwick and Menno Meyjes) of The Siege, starring Denzel Washington, Bruce Willis and Annette Bening, which appeared in November 1998. He also wrote the script of the Showtime movie, Noriega: God's Favorite, directed by Roger Spottiswoode and starring Bob Hoskins, which aired in April 2000. Currently he is working on a script for MGM about John O'Neill, the former head of the FBI's office of counterterrorism in New York, who died on 9/11. Wright is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

James H. Jones – September 25th


Pulitzer Prize finalist for his biography of Alfred Kinsey, Jones is also author of Bad Blood, The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment. Jones will discuss medical ethics and medical history. He is a history professor at the University of Arkansas. Jones' biography, Alfred C. Kinsey: A Public/Private Life (W.W. Norton, 1997), is perhaps the only book ever to be simultaneously reviewed in Science, Playboy and The Nation. Professor Jones' earlier book, Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments, was likewise groundbreaking, controversial and highly acclaimed. He is currently engaged in research on the Houston "bubble boy," the child born without a functioning immune system who was kept alive for a dozen years in sterile isolation.

Aminatta Forna – September 29th


Aminatta Forna is an author, broadcaster and journalist. Her latest book is a passionate and vivid account of an African childhood. A daughter's memoir of her dissident father and her family, The Devil That Danced on the Water (HarperCollins May 2002) is the story of an African nation's transition from democracy to dictatorship. In the United Kingdom it was serialised as 'Book of the Week' on BBC radio and extracted in the Sunday Times newspaper. In the United States where it is to be published by Grove Atlantic, The Devil that Danced on the Water has been chosen by Barnes & Noble bookshop for their Discovery series.

Stanley Crawford – November 16

Stanley G. Crawford is the author of three novels: Log of the S.S. The Mrs. Unguentine, Travel Notes, Gascoyne, and Some Instructions. He is also the author of two memoirs: A Garlic Testament: Seasons on a Small Farm in New Mexico and Mayordomo: Chronicle of an Acequia in Northern New Mexico. He has written numerous articles in various publications such as The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Double Take and Country Living. Mr. Crawford is co-proprietor with his wife, Rose Mary Crawford, of El Bosque Farm in Dixon, New Mexico. Crawford was a 2001 Lannan Fellow.

Jason Schneiderman – Spring

Author of recent first book Sublimation Point, highly praised by United States Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky in an article in the Washington Post. Anthologized in Best American Poetry and the Penguin Book of the Sonnet. Schneiderman teaches literature at Hofstra University in New York.

Mary Karr – March 22

Karr's first memoir, The Liars’ Club, won the PEN Martha Albrand Award for best first nonfiction and was a finalist for The National Book Critics Circle Award. It was on The New York Times bestseller list for more than a year and a "best book" for more than thirty newspapers and magazines. The sequel, Cherry, about her adolescence, was also a bestseller for The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Houston Chronicle. It was a "best book" for those periodicals and The New Yorker, where it was excerpted. Karr's two memoirs are credited with sparking the explosion in that genre.

Karr's grants include The Whiting Writer's Award, an NEA, a Radcliffe Bunting Fellowship, and a Guggenheim. Her work appears in such magazines as The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Poetry, and Parnassus. She is the Jesse Truesdell Peck Professor of Literature at Syracuse University.

Barry Lopez – April 23

In his nonfiction, Mr. Lopez writes often about the relationship between the physical landscape and human culture. In his fiction, he frequently addresses issues of intimacy, ethics, and identity. He is the author of Arctic Dreams, for which he received the National Book Award, Of Wolves and Men, a National Book Award finalist for which he received the John Burroughs and Christopher medals, and eight works of fiction, including Light Action in the Caribbean, Field Notes, and Resistance. His essays are collected in two books, Crossing Open Ground and About This Life. He contributes regularly to Granta, The Georgia Review, Orion, Outside, The Paris Review, Manoa and other publications in the United States and abroad. His work appears in dozens of anthologies, including Best American Essays, Best Spiritual Writing, and the “best” collections from National Geographic, Outside, The Georgia Review, The Paris Review, and other periodicals.

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