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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Alfred McAlister

Associate Professor

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T C 330 • Legislative Health Policy

42385 • Spring 2015
Meets M 700pm-1000pm UTA 6.342
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TC 330: Health Policy Internship and Seminar

Professor: Alfred McAlister, Ph.D.

Office Hours: By appointment

Office Location: UTSPH—ARC

1616 Guadalupe, Suite 6.300, Austin, TX 78701

Email: Alfred.L.McAlister@uth.tmc.edu

Student Assistant: Nicole Kruijs

Office Hours: Make by appointment

 

Prerequisite: Sophomore status and interest in state legislative policymaking.

 

Description: This class allows students to gain first hand experience in health policymaking during their internships with the Texas State Legislature. Students’ Duties may involve research on important health issues, responses to constituents, communication with interest groups and government agencies, support for drafting and interpreting bills, and for tracking and influencing their advancement. The time commitment is ten to fifteen hours per week. Students’ time will be divided between work at the Capitol, outside research, and seminars in which they present and discuss health-related bills and amendments. This is a great opportunity for students interested in public health, law, or medicine to learn about key health policy issues and the process of passing legislation.

 

Grading Policy: Letter grades without pluses and minuses are assigned on the basis of the students’ written assignment (50%), their class presentation (30%) and attendance (20%).

 

Attendance: The class will meet from 4-6pm on Mondays. Class discussion topics will be selected from the legislative issues with which the students are involved.

 

Course Assignment: Students must choose a topic of interest based on legislation they have been working on and write a 10-page paper about it. The paper may include outside research as well as anything students have worked on during their internship. The paper will also be accompanied by a short presentation to the class about the issue. These are due no later than the last day of class.

 

Readings: These will be assigned by the Senate office in which students work, and selected by the students with guidance from Professor McAlister for use in the course assignment.

 

Alfred L. McAlister received his B.S. in Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972 and his Ph.D. in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University in 1976. Before returning to Texas in 1982, he taught for five years at the Harvard School of Public Health. As a faculty member at the University of Texas School of Public Health, he has received grants and awards from the National Institutes of Health and the Carnegie Corporation totaling more than seventeen million dollars. These have supported action-oriented and policy-related research and publications concerning cardiovascular disease and cancer prevention, HIV infection control, ethnic relations, homicide and collective violence. He has worked extensively in international public health projects, with twenty years of frequent service with the National Public Health Institute of Finland. Professor McAlister also has more than two decades of experience in public health programs with bi-national populations on the Texas-Mexico border. Leisure-time interests include modern South Texas folklore, fishing and coastal marine exploration. Raised in Austin, Professor McAlister is married to Marjatta McAlister and has three children.

T C 357 • Pub Hlth, Med, & Social Policy

42415 • Spring 2015
Meets T 1000am-100pm UTA 6.342
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CURRICULUM

UT AUSTIN

TC 357 Plan II Junior Seminar: Public Health, Medicine, and Social Policy

Professors: Stanley Joel Reiser & Alfred McAlister

General Description: Maintaining health and treating illness have been transcendent matters for individuals and societies throughout history, spawning the creation of social institutions, policies, and professions to meet these significant needs.

This seminar explores, from historical to contemporary times, leading intellectual concepts, issues and events of this development.  It aims to provide a fundamental understanding of how health care is given and works, and what are its consequences.  To accomplish these goals the course content is as follows:

Weeks 1-3:  The Evolution of Medicine

Weeks 4-6:  The Development of Public Health

Week 7:  The Affordable Care Act: How It Will Change Healthcare

Week 8:  Smoking and Health: Confronting Habit, Commerce and Mortality

Week 9:  The Obesity Epidemic: Causes, Remedies and Policy Dilemmas

Week 10:  Disparities in the Health of the American Population: Origins, Costs, Consequences

Week 11:  Screening for Diseases: Benefits and Perils

Weeks 12-13:  Student Presentations

Course Requirements: A 10-15-page research paper, a 1-page reflection on each of the weekly readings, a 15-minute oral presentation based on the research paper, and class participation. All requirements will be equally weighed in determining the grade for the course.

Texts: Stanley Joel Reiser, Technological Medicine: The Changing World of Doctors and Patients.  New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009.  This text will be accompanied by historical and contemporary articles that deal specifically with the multiple issues embraced by the specific topics to be considered in the course.

UT SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Curriculum for the Graduate Certificate in Public Health:

1. Biostatistics (4 credits) – Theory and methods analyzing public health data. This course is designed as a biostatistics course for students who have not previously taken a course in Biostatistics and is a designated core course for MPH students. This course introduces the development and application of statistical reasoning and methods in addressing, analyzing and solving problems in public health. Computer applications are included.

2. Epidemiology (3 credits) – Methods for understanding causes of morbidity and mortality, contemporary problems in public health. This course introduces students to principles and concepts in epidemiology through lectures, discussions, assigned readings, and exercises. Students are given the opportunity to acquire an understanding of epidemiologic principles and concepts, the vocabulary of epidemiology, methods of epidemiologic investigation, and the design, interpretation, and evaluation of epidemiologic research. The emphasis is on public health practice of epidemiology, and this course serves as the core epidemiology course for most MPH students.

3. Health Policy & Management (3 credits) – Public and private policies and their impact on public health, structure of health systems, management methods. This course surveys theory and practice in the management and policy sciences applied to the field of public health. Topics include: public health in the US health system/ legal bases of public health; public policy institutions and decision-making processes; methods of policy analysis, public sector institutions, management and decision-making; and private sector health care institutions, management and decision making.

4. Environmental Health (3 credits) – Measuring and understanding the interactions between humans, their environment and public health. The major goals of this course are to develop a general awareness of how the man-made and natural ecosystem interact to affect health and the quality of life, review relevant principles from the natural sciences, and discuss issues influencing the solutions to environmental health problems. This will be accomplished through lectures, videos, class discussions, group activities, written assignments and examinations.

5. Behavioral Sciences (3 credits) – Understanding and changing individual and collective health behaviors. This course focuses on health problems and issues and public health methods that have a major social or behavioral component. It is intended for the student with little background in the behavioral sciences. The course will enable students to describe one or two core theoretical perspectives from each of the social science disciplines of psychology, sociology, and anthropology, and their application to public health. The course will cover the major social and behavioral science models used in health promotion and disease prevention. The course will also cover existing social inequalities in health status related to race, social class, and gender, and the critical intersection between social risk factors, behavioral risk factors, and the development and implementation of public health interventions. The problems considered in this course will vary from year to year, but include topics with social and behavioral risks.

NOTE: Students have the option to take the five courses above online if preferred.  Tuition for UTSPH courses is separate from and in addition to your UT Austin tuition.  For in state Texas students tuition is approximately $800 per class (pay as you enroll); the cost of the entire Graduate Certificate Program is approximately $4000.

UT School of Public Health, Graduate Certificate in Public Health Program Website: https://sph.uth.edu/academics/graduate-certificate-programs/public-health-certificate/

About the Professors:

Stanley Joel Reiser is known nationally and internationally for his scholarship and teaching in ethics, history, technology assessment, and health policy. He received his undergraduate education at Columbia University, his medical degree from the State University of New York-Downstate Medical Center, and his master’s and doctoral degrees from Harvard University. He began his academic career at Harvard, where he was Associate Professor and founding Director of the Program in Medical History at Harvard Medical School, founding Co-Director of the Harvard Interfaculty Program in Medical Ethics, and Clinical Associate in Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital. After twelve years at Harvard, he went to the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, where he was the Griff T. Ross Professor of Humanities and Technology in Health Care from 1982 to 2007, and held appointments in its faculties of medicine, public health, biomedical sciences, nursing, and dentistry. In 2007 Dr. Reiser went to Washington, D.C. to teach at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Care Sciences as Clinical Professor of Health Sciences, and of Health Policy. In 2012 he moved to Austin, Texas, where he joined the faculty of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health, Austin Regional Campus, as Adjunct Professor. He remains on the faculty of the George Washington Medical School as visiting Clinical Professor.

He has written more than 120 books and essays, and is sole author on over 100 of them. His articles have appeared in such publications as The Journal of the American Medical Association, The New England Journal of Medicine, The Annals of Internal Medicine, The American Journal of Public Health, The Hastings Center Report, The Scientific American, and The New York Times. He has given addresses at some 300 national and international forums and institutions.

Dr. Reiser has been involved in the creation four fields of health care: Medical Ethics, Technology Assessment, Institutional Values and Governance in Health Care Organizations, and the collaboration of Medicine and Public Health. His last book, Technological Medicine: The Changing World of Doctors and Patients, was published by Cambridge University Press in Fall 2009. This press also will publish the book he is now writing: From House Calls to Email: The History and Future of Health Care Delivery. It is scheduled to appear in 2015.

Alfred L. McAlister received his B.S. in Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972 and his Ph.D. in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University in 1976. Before returning to Texas in 1982, he taught for five years at the Harvard School of Public Health. As a faculty member at the University of Texas School of Public Health, he has received grants and awards from the National Institutes of Health and the Carnegie Corporation totaling more than seventeen million dollars. These have supported action-oriented and policy-related research and publications concerning cardiovascular disease and cancer prevention, HIV infection control, ethnic relations, homicide and collective violence. He has worked extensively in international public health projects, with twenty years of frequent service with the National Public Health Institute of Finland. Professor McAlister also has more than two decades of experience in public health programs with bi-national populations on the Texas-Mexico border. Leisure-time interests include modern South Texas folklore, fishing and coastal marine exploration. Raised in Austin, Professor McAlister is married to Marjatta McAlister and has three children.

T C 330 • Hlth/Social Pol Tx Legislature

43410 • Fall 2014
Meets M 700pm-1000pm
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Course Number: TC 330                                                               

Title: Health and Social Policy Formation in the Texas Legislature

Instructor: Alfred L. McAlister, Professor, PhD, UT School of Public Health

Semester: Fall 2014

 

Description:

This service-learning course allows students to gain first-hand experience in health and social policy-making during their internships with the Texas State Legislature.  Students’ duties may involve research on important health care and other social policy issues, responses to constituents, communication with interest groups and government agencies, support for drafting and interpreting bills, and for tracking and influencing their advancement.  The time commitment is ten to fifteen hours per week.  Students’ time will be divided between work at the Capitol, outside research, and seminars in which they present and discuss health/social policy related bills and amendments.

 

Texts/Readings:

These will be assigned by the Legislative office in which students work, and selected by the students with guidance from Professor McAlister for use in the course assignment and will be related to the specific health/social area they work on during the course of the semester.

 

Assignments:

Grades are assigned on the basis of the students’ written assignment (50%), their class presentation (30%), and attendance (20%).

Students must choose a topic of interest based on legislation they have been working on and write a 10-page paper about it.  The paper may include outside research as well as anything students have worked on during their internship.  The paper will also be accompanied by a short presentation to the class about the issue.  These are due no later than the last day of class.

 

About the Professor:

Alfred L. McAlister received his B.S. in Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972 and his Ph.D. in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University in 1976. Before returning to Texas in 1982, he taught for five years at the Harvard School of Public Health. As a faculty member at the University of Texas School of Public Health, he has received grants and awards from the National Institutes of Health and the Carnegie Corporation totaling more than seventeen million dollars. These have supported action-oriented and policy-related research and publications concerning cardiovascular disease and cancer prevention, HIV infection control, ethnic relations, homicide and collective violence. He has worked extensively in international public health projects, with twenty years of frequent service with the National Public Health Institute of Finland. Professor McAlister also has more than two decades of experience in public health programs with bi-national populations on the Texas-Mexico border. Leisure-time interests include Master’s swimming, bicycling and kayaking. Raised in Austin, Professor McAlister is married to Marjatta McAlister and has three children.

 

T C 357 • Pub Hlth, Med, & Social Policy

43780 • Spring 2014
Meets T 1000am-100pm
show description

Professors: Stanley Joel Reiser & Alfred McAlister

General Description: Maintaining health and treating illness have been transcendent matters for individuals and societies throughout history, spawning the creation of social institutions, policies, and professions to meet these significant needs.

This seminar explores, from historical to contemporary times, leading intellectual concepts, issues and events of this development.  It aims to provide a fundamental understanding of how health care is given and works, and what are its consequences.  To accomplish these goals the course content is as follows:

Weeks 1-3:  The Evolution of Medicine

Weeks 4-6:  The Development of Public Health

Week 7:  The Affordable Care Act: How It Will Change Healthcare

Week 8:  Smoking and Health: Confronting Habit, Commerce and Mortality

Week 9:  The Obesity Epidemic: Causes, Remedies and Policy Dilemmas

Week 10:  Disparities in the Health of the American Population: Origins, Costs, Consequences

Week 11:  Screening for Diseases: Benefits and Perils

Weeks 12-13:  Student Presentations

Course Requirements: A 10-15-page research paper, a 1-page reflection on each of the weekly readings, a 15-minute oral presentation based on the research paper, and class participation. All requirements will be equally weighed in determining the grade for the course.

Texts: Stanley Joel Reiser, Technological Medicine: The Changing World of Doctors and Patients.  New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009.  This text will be accompanied by historical and contemporary articles that deal specifically with the multiple issues embraced by the specific topics to be considered in the course.

 

Stanley Joel Reiser is known nationally and internationally for his scholarship and teaching in ethics, history, technology assessment, and health policy. He received his undergraduate education at Columbia University, his medical degree from the State University of New York-Downstate Medical Center, and his master’s and doctoral degrees from Harvard University. He began his academic career at Harvard, where he was Associate Professor and founding Director of the Program in Medical History at Harvard Medical School, founding Co-Director of the Harvard Interfaculty Program in Medical Ethics, and Clinical Associate in Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital. After twelve years at Harvard, he went to the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, where he was the Griff T. Ross Professor of Humanities and Technology in Health Care from 1982 to 2007, and held appointments in its faculties of medicine, public health, biomedical sciences, nursing, and dentistry. In 2007 Dr. Reiser went to Washington, D.C. to teach at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Care Sciences as Clinical Professor of Health Sciences, and of Health Policy. In 2012 he moved to Austin, Texas, where he joined the faculty of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health, Austin Regional Campus, as Adjunct Professor. He remains on the faculty of the George Washington Medical School as visiting Clinical Professor.

He has written more than 120 books and essays, and is sole author on over 100 of them. His articles have appeared in such publications as The Journal of the American Medical Association, The New England Journal of Medicine, The Annals of Internal Medicine, The American Journal of Public Health, The Hastings Center Report, The Scientific American, and The New York Times. He has given addresses at some 300 national and international forums and institutions.

Dr. Reiser has been involved in the creation four fields of health care: Medical Ethics, Technology Assessment, Institutional Values and Governance in Health Care Organizations, and the collaboration of Medicine and Public Health. His last book, Technological Medicine: The Changing World of Doctors and Patients, was published by Cambridge University Press in Fall 2009. This press also will publish the book he is now writing: From House Calls to Email: The History and Future of Health Care Delivery. It is scheduled to appear in 2015.

Alfred L. McAlister received his B.S. in Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972 and his Ph.D. in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University in 1976. Before returning to Texas in 1982, he taught for five years at the Harvard School of Public Health. As a faculty member at the University of Texas School of Public Health, he has received grants and awards from the National Institutes of Health and the Carnegie Corporation totaling more than seventeen million dollars. These have supported action-oriented and policy-related research and publications concerning cardiovascular disease and cancer prevention, HIV infection control, ethnic relations, homicide and collective violence. He has worked extensively in international public health projects, with twenty years of frequent service with the National Public Health Institute of Finland. Professor McAlister also has more than two decades of experience in public health programs with bi-national populations on the Texas-Mexico border. Leisure-time interests include modern South Texas folklore, fishing and coastal marine exploration. Raised in Austin, Professor McAlister is married to Marjatta McAlister and has three children.

T C 330 • Hlth/Social Pol Tx Legislature

42880 • Fall 2011
Meets M 400pm-600pm
show description

Description:This service-learning course allows students to gain first-hand experience in health and social policy-making during their internships with the Texas State Legislature.  Students’ duties may involve research on important health care and other social policy issues, responses to constituents, communication with interest groups and government agencies, support for drafting and interpreting bills, and for tracking and influencing their advancement.  The time commitment is ten to fifteen hours per week.  Students’ time will be divided between work at the Capitol, outside research, and seminars in which they present and discuss health/social policy related bills and amendments.

Texts/Readings:These will be assigned by the Legislative office in which students work, and selected by the students with guidance from Professor McAlister for use in the course assignment and will be related to the specific health/social area they work on during the course of the semester.

Assignments:Grades are assigned on the basis of the students’ written assignment (50%), their class presentation (30%), and attendance (20%).Students must choose a topic of interest based on legislation they have been working on and write a 10-page paper about it.  The paper may include outside research as well as anything students have worked on during their internship.  The paper will also be accompanied by a short presentation to the class about the issue.  These are due no later than the last day of class.

About the Professor:Alfred L. McAlister received his B.S. in Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972 and his Ph.D. in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University in 1976. Before returning to Texas in 1982, he taught for five years at the Harvard School of Public Health. As a faculty member at the University of Texas School of Public Health, he has received grants and awards from the National Institutes of Health and the Carnegie Corporation totaling more than seventeen million dollars. These have supported action-oriented and policy-related research and publications concerning cardiovascular disease and cancer prevention, HIV infection control, ethnic relations, homicide and collective violence. He has worked extensively in international public health projects, with twenty years of frequent service with the National Public Health Institute of Finland. Professor McAlister also has more than two decades of experience in public health programs with bi-national populations on the Texas-Mexico border. Leisure-time interests include modern South Texas folklore, fishing and coastal marine exploration. Raised in Austin, Professor McAlister is married to Marjatta McAlister and has three children.

T C 330 • Legislative Health Policy

43435 • Spring 2011
Meets M 400pm-600pm
show description

Description: This Service Learning Course gives students in medicine, law and government first hand experience in public health policy formation in the Texas legislature. Selected students will be placed in assistance of leading Senators and State Representatives. Duties may involve research on issues, responses to constituents, communication with interest groups and government agencies, support for drafting and interpreting bills, and for tracking and influencing their advancement. The time commitment is ten to fifteen hours per week. Students’ time will be divided between work at the Capitol, outside research, and seminars in which they present and discuss health-related bills and amendments.

 

Readings:

Students will read bills introduced in the 80th legislative session and the most significant background documents related to their legislative deliberation. They will also prepare and complete a list of supplementary readings that include academic publications, empirical reports and popular discourse on the topic addressed by the bill(s). Illustrations of scholarly readings from previous classes include research publications on the price elasticity of tobacco products and the impact of tobacco taxes on adolescent smoking onset, health disparities and the costs of disparities in the provision of preventive services for children, and the effects of credentialing and continuing education requirements on the supply and competence of health care providers.

 

Requirements:

(1) Minimum of ten hours per week in direct assistance to the office of State Senator or Representative

(2) Oral presentations on bills and issues at weekly seminars

(3) Completion of term paper of 2000 words or more describing the background and purpose for a particular bill, and the bill’s deliberation and progress toward enactment

 

About the Professor:

Alfred L. McAlister received his B.S. in Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972 and his Ph.D. in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University in 1976. Before returning to Texas in 1982, he taught for five years at the Harvard School of Public Health. As a faculty member at the University of Texas School of Public Health, he has received grants and awards from the National Institutes of Health and the Carnegie Corporation totaling more than seventeen million dollars. These have supported action-oriented and policy-related research and publications concerning cardiovascular disease and cancer prevention, HIV infection control, ethnic relations, homicide and collective violence. He has worked extensively in international public health projects, with twenty years of frequent service with the National Public Health Institute of Finland. Professor McAlister also has more than two decades of experience in public health programs with bi-national populations on the Texas-Mexico border. Leisure-time interests include modern South Texas folklore, fishing and coastal marine exploration. Raised in Austin, Professor McAlister is married to Marjatta McAlister and has three children.

T C 330 • Hlth/Social Pol Tx Legislature

42830 • Fall 2010
Meets M 400pm-600pm
show description

Description:

This service-learning course allows students to gain first-hand experience in health and social policy-making during their internships with the Texas State Legislature.  Students’ duties may involve research on important health care and other social policy issues, responses to constituents, communication with interest groups and government agencies, support for drafting and interpreting bills, and for tracking and influencing their advancement.  The time commitment is ten to fifteen hours per week.  Students’ time will be divided between work at the Capitol, outside research, and seminars in which they present and discuss health/social policy related bills and amendments.

 

Texts/Readings:

These will be assigned by the Legislative office in which students work, and selected by the students with guidance from Professor McAlister for use in the course assignment and will be related to the specific health/social area they work on during the course of the semester.

 

Assignments:

Grades are assigned on the basis of the students’ written assignment (50%), their class presentation (30%), and attendance (20%).

Students must choose a topic of interest based on legislation they have been working on and write a 10-page paper about it.  The paper may include outside research as well as anything students have worked on during their internship.  The paper will also be accompanied by a short presentation to the class about the issue.  These are due no later than the last day of class.

 

About the Professor:

Alfred L. McAlister received his B.S. in Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972 and his Ph.D. in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University in 1976. Before returning to Texas in 1982, he taught for five years at the Harvard School of Public Health. As a faculty member at the University of Texas School of Public Health, he has received grants and awards from the National Institutes of Health and the Carnegie Corporation totaling more than seventeen million dollars. These have supported action-oriented and policy-related research and publications concerning cardiovascular disease and cancer prevention, HIV infection control, ethnic relations, homicide and collective violence. He has worked extensively in international public health projects, with twenty years of frequent service with the National Public Health Institute of Finland. Professor McAlister also has more than two decades of experience in public health programs with bi-national populations on the Texas-Mexico border. Leisure-time interests include modern South Texas folklore, fishing and coastal marine exploration. Raised in Austin, Professor McAlister is married to Marjatta McAlister and has three children.

T C 330 • Legislative Health Policy

43570 • Spring 2010
Meets M 400pm-600pm
show description

TC  330: Health Policy Internship and Seminar

Professor: Alfred McAlister, Ph.D.
Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location: UTSPH-ARC 323 E 12th, Austin TX 78701
Email: Alfred.L.McAlister@uth.tmc.edu

Student Assistant: Pallavi Shankar
Office Hours: Make by appointment
Email: pallavi.shankar@gmail.com

Prerequisite:  Sophomore status and interest in state legislative policy-making.

Description: This class allows students to gain first-hand experience in health policy-making during their internships with the Texas State Legislature. Students duties may involve research on important health issues, responses to constituents, communication with interest groups and government agencies, support for drafting and interpreting bills, and for tracking and influencing their advancement. The time commitment is ten to fifteen hours per week. Students’ time will be divided between work at the Capitol, outside research, and seminars in which they present and discuss health-related bills and amendments. This is a great opportunity for students interested in public health, law, or medicine to learn about key health policy issues and the process of passing legislation.

Grading Policy: Letter grades without pluses and minuses are assigned on the basis of the students’ written assignment (50%), their class presentation (30%) and attendance (20%).

Attendance: The class will meet from 4-6pm on Mondays. Class discussion topics will be selected from the legislative issues with which the students are involved.

Course Assignment: Students must choose a topic of interest based on legislation they have been working on and write a 10-page paper about it. The paper may include outside research as well as anything students have worked on during their internship. The paper will also be accompanied by a short presentation to the class about the issue. These are due no later than the last day of class.

Readings: These will be assigned by the Senate office in which students work, and selected by the students with guidance from Professor McAlister for use in the course assignment.

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