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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Mounira Charrad

Associate Professor Ph.D., Harvard

Mounira Charrad

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Biography

Mounira (Maya) Charrad received her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her undergraduate degree from the Sorbonne in Paris. Her research has centered on state formation, colonialism, law, citizenship, kinship and women’s rights. More specifically, she has considered strategies of state building in kin-based societies and how struggles over state power shaped the expansion or curtailment of women's rights. She is currently studying conceptions of modernity in legal discourses in the Middle East. Challenging explanations of politics based on a textual approach to religion, she offers instead a focus on social solidarities and where they are grounded (kinship, ethnicity, or other).  Her work has been translated into French and Arabic, and featured on websites and in the media. Her research has been funded by several grants including the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mellon Foundation, the American Association of University Women, and the American Institute of Maghribi Studies

Her book, States and Women's Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco(University of California Press,2001)won the following awards:

  • Distinguished Scholarly Book Award, American Sociological Association.
  • Best Book on Politics and History Greenstone Award, American Political Science Association.
  • Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Award. Outstanding Book in Political Sociology, American Sociological Association, Section on Political Sociology.
  • Outstanding Scholarly Book in Any Field Hamilton Award, University of Texas at Austin.
  • Best First Book in the Field of History Award, Phi Alpha Theta International Honor Society in History, 2002.
  • Best Book in Sociology Komarosvky Award, Honorable Mention, Eastern Sociological Society, 2003.

Professor Charrad teaches courses on Comparative/Historical Methods; Political Sociology; Gender Politics in the Islamic World; The Veil:  History, Culture and Politics; Global Gender Inequality; and Gender and Development.

She is affiliated with the Center for European Studies; the Center for Middle East Studies; the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies; the Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice; and the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. She also holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Middle East Studies.

Selected other publications:

Patrimonial Capitalism and Empire, Mounira M. Charrad and Julia P. Adams, eds., Special Issue of Political Power and Social Theory, forthcoming.

 “Sustained Reforms of Islamic Family Law: Tunisia under Authoritarian Regimes, 1950s to 2010,” Mounira M. Charrad and Hyun Jeong Ha in Family Law and Gender in the Modern Middle East,Adrien Wing and Hisham Kassim (eds.), New York: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming.

“Limits of Empire:  The French Colonial State and Local Patrimonialism.”  Mounira M. Charrad and Daniel Jaster, in Mounira M. Charrad and Julia Adams, eds., Patrimonial Capitalism and Empire, special issue of Political Power and Social Theory, forthcoming. 

“From Colonialism to the Arab Spring:  Gender, Religion and State,” Mounira M. Charrad and Amina Zarrugh in Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, Robert A. Scottand Stephen M. Kosslyn, eds, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, in press. 

“Equal or Complementary? Women in the New Tunisian Constitution after the Arab Spring,” Mounira M. Charrad and Amina Zarrugh, Journal of North African Studies 19 (2), 2014.

"The Arab Spring and Women's Rights in Tunisia." Mounira M. Charrad and Amina Zarrugh.  E-International Relations, sept.4, 2014 http://www.e-ir.info/2013/09/04/the-arab-spring-and-womens-rights-in-tunisia/

 “Central and Local Patrimonialism:  State Building in Kin-Based Societies” in Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams and Mounira M. Charrad, eds, Vol. 636 of The Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. New York, NY: Sage, 2011.

Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams and Mounira M. Charrad, eds, Vol. 636 of The Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. New York, NY: Sage, 2011.

“Gender in the Middle East: Islam, States, Agency,” Annual Review of Sociology. Vol 37. 2011.

 “Women’s Agency across Cultures:  Conceptualizing Strengths and Boundaries,” in Women’s Agency:  Silences and Voices, Special issue, Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 33 (6), December 2010.

Guest Editor, Women’s Agency: Silences and Voices, Special issue, Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 33 (6), December 2010.

“Kinship, Islam or Oil:  Culprits of Gender Inequality?” Politics and Gender (A Journal of the American Political Science Association). Vol. 5 (4), December 2009:  546-553.

“Tunisia at the Forefront of the Arab World:  Two Waves of Gender Legislation.”  Washington and Lee Law Review. Vol. 64 (4), Fall 2007:  1513-27 Revised and Reprinted in Women in the Middle East and North Africa: Agents of Changeedited by Fatima Sadiqi and Moha Ennaji.  New York: Routledge, 2010.

“Contexts, Concepts and Contentions:  Gender Legislation in the Middle East.”  Hawwa: Journal of Women in the Middle East and the Islamic World.  2007. Vol. 5 (1): 55-72.

“Unequal Citizenship:  Issues of Gender Justice in the Middle East and North Africa.”  In Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay, ed.,Gender Justice, Citizenship and Development, Ottawa, Canada:  International Development Research Centre, 2007.

"Becoming a Citizen:  Lineage Versus Individual in Morocco and Tunisia." In Gender and Citizenship in the Middle East, Suad Joseph, ed.  Syracuse, NY:  Syracuse University Press, 2000, pp. 70-87.  

"Policy Shifts:  State, Islam and Gender in Tunisia, 1930s -- 1990s."  In Social Politics, Summer 1997, Vol. 4 (2):  284-319. Expanded as “Continuity or Change:  Family Law and Family Structure in Tunisia.” With Allyson Goeken. In African Families at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century, ed. By Yaw Oheneba-Sakyi and Baffour K. Takyi, Westport, CT:  Praeger, 2006; Revised and reprinted as “Family Law and Ideological Debates in Postcolonial Tunisia.” in Yount, K.M.and H. Rashad (eds.). Family in the Middle East: Ideational Change in Egypt, Iran, and Tunisia: Routledge, 2008.

Interests

Gender & Women's Rights; Political Sociology; Social Theory; Colonialism; Comparative-Historical Sociology; Globalization; Middle East and North Africa.

T C 302 • What Is Power?

43730 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.122
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Description:

The seminar considers the many faces of power. With an interdisciplinary social science approach, we discuss how power is constructed and exerted in the public and private spheres. We start with politics in the public sphere with classic theories such as those of Karl Marx and Max Weber and continue with more recent formulations such as in anticolonial struggles. We explore forms of domination at the personal level and in social interaction. How the personal is political becomes a focus of the discussion.   We use audiovisuals and short stories to illustrate points made in the social science literature.

 

Texts/Readings/Films:

·       Karl Marx, The Communist Manifesto.

·       Max Weber, “Class, Status and Party” (Abbreviated, on Blackboard).

·       Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth (Selections).

·       P. Berger and R. Neuhaus, To Empower People: The Role of Mediating Structures in Public Policy (45pp.)

·       Film: Frantz Fanon: Black Skin White Masks.

·       Film:  The Battle of Algiers

 

Assignments:

Participation/posting questions                20%

Class Presentation/Leading discussion      20%

Papers (4 total)                                      60%

 

About the Professor:

Mounira M. Charrad is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas in Austin.  Her book, States and Women's Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco <http://www.ucpress.edu/books/pages/5702.html> (University of California Press), won the Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association and the Best Book on Politics and History Greenstone Award from the American Political Science Association, and the Hamilton Award from the University of Texas.  Her articles have centered on state formation, law, citizenship, kinship and gender. Her current research considers conceptions of modernity in legal discourses in the Middle East.  Her edited volumes include Women's Agency: Silences and Voices, Patrimonial Power in the Modern World and Patrimonialism, Global History and Imperial Rule.

T C 357 • The Veil: Hist, Cul, And Polit

43510 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.118
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The course considers the history o the veil, its cultural meanings, and its place in political discourse.  We start by examining the practice of veiling in early Christianity and Islam and the myths that surround its origin.  We then discuss how the veil was intertwined with the "Woman's question" and nationalism in the mid twentieth century in the height of struggles of national liberation in the Middle East.  In the contemporary period, the veil has become an object of fascination in Western societies and a highly charged symbol in the Islamic world.  We explore the multiple meanings of the veil both in political debates and in the individual lives of women. How the veil can range from a form of subordination to a sign of empowerment for women is addressed. Course Objectives:  By the end of the term, students will have the ability to:1)    Describe and characterize a broad array of issues concerning the veil and place veiling in broader social, economic and political contexts.2)    Evaluate the place of broader processes and especially politics in shaping discourses on veiling and gender.3)    Analyze the debates on gender in the Middle East and in other countries. Required Readings (will be discussed in class):        ·        Nikki Keddie, Women in the Middle East:  Past and Present.  Princeton U. Press.        ·        Malek Alloula, The Colonial Harem, U. of Minnesota Press.        ·        Jennifer Heath, ed., The Veil:  Women Writers on its History, Lore, and Politics.  U. of Calif.  Press.Charrad, “Veils and Laws:  Multiple Meanings of the Veil.” On BlackboardCharrad, “Women Ally with the Devil.”  On Blackboard.Charrad, “Gender in the Middle East: Islam, State, Agency.” Annual Review of Sociology, 2011.  Available on line through the UT Library System. News Media Articles:  Short articles from the New York Times and the BBC:  The text or link will be posted on Blackboard.

Requirements: The requirements for the seminar are a research paper and presentations on the readings.  The research paper is developed in stages during the course of the seminar on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor. Students are encouraged to do research on a topic of interest. They may conduct the research on their own or in teams.  Examples of topics include veiling practices in a given country, laws on veiling (either forcing women to put on a veil as in Iran or to drop it as in Turkey), and interviews of women who wear a veil. 

Mounira (Maya) Charrad received her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her undergraduate degree from the Sorbonne in Paris. Her research has centered on state formation, colonialism, law, citizenship, kinship and women’s rights. More specifically, she has considered strategies of state building in kin-based societies and how struggles over state power shaped the expansion or curtailment of women's rights. She is currently studying conceptions of modernity in legal discourses in the Middle East. Challenging explanations of politics based on a textual approach to religion, she offers instead a focus on social solidarities and where they are grounded (kinship, ethnicity, or other).  Her work has been translated into French and Arabic, and featured on websites and in the media. Her research has been funded by several grants including the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mellon Foundation, the American Association of University Women, and the American Institute of Maghribi Studies

T C 357 • The Veil: Hist, Cul, And Polit

43045 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 480
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THE VEIL: HISTORY, CULTURE AND POLITICS
Plan 2 -- TC 357
 
Professor Mounira Maya Charrad
Plan 2 Junior Seminar
Office:  Burdine 504
Tel. 232 6311; Email: charrad@austin.utexas.edu
Mailbox: Sociology Department Office, BUR 552
 
Description:              The course considers the history o the veil, its cultural meanings, and its place in political discourse.  We start by examining the practice of veiling in early Christianity and Islam and the myths that surround its origin.  We then discuss how the veil was intertwined with the "Woman's question" and nationalism in the mid twentieth century in the height of struggles of national liberation in the Middle East.  In the contemporary period, the veil has become an object of fascination in Western societies and a highly charged symbol in the Islamic world.  We explore the multiple meanings of the veil both in political debates and in the individual lives of women. How the veil can range from a form of subordination to a sign of empowerment for women is addressed.
 
Course Objectives:  By the end of the term, students will have the ability to:
1)    Describe and characterize a broad array of issues concerning the veil and place veiling in broader social, economic and political contexts.
2)    Evaluate the place of broader processes and especially politics in shaping discourses on veiling and gender.
3)    Analyze the debates on gender in the Middle East and in other countries.
 
Required Readings (will be discussed in class):
        ·        Nikki Keddie, Women in the Middle East:  Past and Present.  Princeton U. Press.
        ·        Malek Alloula, The Colonial Harem, U. of Minnesota Press.
        ·        Jennifer Heath, ed., The Veil:  Women Writers on its History, Lore, and Politics.  U. of Calif.  Press.
Charrad, “Veils and Laws:  Multiple Meanings of the Veil.” On Blackboard
Charrad, “Women Ally with the Devil.”  On Blackboard.
Charrad, “Gender in the Middle East: Islam, State, Agency.” Annual Review of Sociology, 2011.  Available on line through the UT Library System.
 
News Media Articles:  Short articles from the New York Times and the BBC:  The text or link will be posted on Blackboard.

T C 357 • The Veil: Hist, Cul, And Polit

42935 • Fall 2011
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 480
show description

Description:The course considers the history of the veil, its cultural meanings, and its place in political discourse.  We start by examining the practice of veiling in early Christianity and Islam and the myths that surround its origin.  We then discuss how the veil was intertwined with the "woman's question" and nationalism in the mid twentieth century in the height of struggles of national liberation in the Middle East.  In the contemporary period, The veil has become an object of fascination in Western societies and a highly charged symbol in the Islamic world. We explore the multiple meanings of the veil both in political debates and in the individual lives of women. How the veil can range from a form of subordination to a sign of empowerment for women is a question we address.

Readings:The readings for the seminar are interdisciplinary, drawing on Sociology, Anthropology, and History.  They include two major books and a packet of recent articles.  The books are Women in the Middle East by renowned historian Nikki Keddie and Veiled Sentiments by Lila Abu Lughod, a leading anthropologist of gender.  Placing the lives of women and the veil in historical context, the first book focuses on the diversity and richness of women’s experiences in the Middle East.  The second highlights how gender roles relate to the twin codes of honor and modesty as codes of behavior pervading the Middle East.  It also shows how these codes translate into veiling. Articles in the packet address the place of the veil in today’s ideologies and politics not only in the Islamic world, but also in the United States and Western Europe, where the headscarf has become an object of political confrontation.  From time to time, we use current newspaper articles or media segments in our discussions.Note: Audiovisuals are used frequently during the semester to illustrate variations in the veil from Afghanistan to Morocco and elsewhere.  We see pictures of the veil in different countries and documentaries on debates on veiling.

Requirements:The requirements for the seminar are a research paper and presentations on the readings.  The research paper is developed in stages during the course of the seminar on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor. Students are encouraged to do research on a topic of interest. They may conduct the research on their own or in teams.  Examples of topics include veiling practices in a given country, laws on veiling (either forcing women to put on a veil as in Iran or to drop it as in Turkey), and interviews of women who wear a veil.   

About the Professor:Dr. Charrad received her PhD from Harvard University and her undergraduate degree from the Sorbonne in Paris, France. She joined UT in 2000-01. Her interests include gender and women's rights, political sociology, development, comparative historical methodology, and the Middle East and North Africa.

T C 357 • The Veil: Hist, Cul, And Polit

43620 • Spring 2010
Meets M 400pm-700pm WEL 3.260
show description

     THE VEIL: HISTORY, CULTURE AND POLITICS

Professor Mounira Maya Charrad

Spring 2010, Monday 4 to 6.45 PM in WEL 3.260.  Moved to BUR 480.

Plan 2 Junior Seminar.  Unique Number:  43620.

Office: BUR 552. Office hours:  W. 6.45 – 7.30 PM and Tu 4 – 5 PM.

Tel. 232 6311; Email: charrad@austin.utexas.edu

Mailbox: Sociology Department Office, BUR 552.

The University of Texas at Austin will provide upon request academic accommodations to qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, call the office of the Dean of students at 471 6259.

The course considers the history of the veil, its cultural meanings, and its place in political discourse.  We start by examining the practice of veiling in early Christianity and Islam and the myths that surround its origin.  We then discuss how the veil was intertwined with the "Woman's question" and nationalism in the mid twentieth century in the height of struggles of national liberation in the Middle East.  In the contemporary period, the veil has become an object of fascination in Western societies and a highly charged symbol in the Islamic world.  We explore the multiple meanings of the veil both in political debates and in the individual lives of women. How the veil can range from a form of subordination to a sign of empowerment for women is addressed.

Books:

         ·         Nikki Keddie, Women in the Middle East:  Past and Present.  Princeton U. Press. 

         ·         Lila Abu Lughod, Veiled Sentiment:  Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society.  UC Press.

         ·         Marnia Lazreg Questioning the Veil: Open Letters to Muslim Women, Princeton U. Press.

Scholarly Articles:  

  • Shavarini, Mitra K  “Wearing the Veil to College: The Paradox of Higher Education in the Lives of Iranian Women.”   International Journal of Middle East Studies, vol. 38, no. 2, pp.189-211, May 2006.
  • Secor, Anna J. “The Veil and Urban Space in Istanbul: Women's Dress, Mobility and Islamic Knowledge.”  Gender, Place and Culture, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 5-22, Mar 2002.
  • Atasoy, Yildiz.  “Governing Women's Morality: A Study of Islamic Veiling in Canada.” in  European Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 203-221, May 2006
  • Carle, Robert.  “Hijab and the Limits of French Secular Republicanism.” Society, vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 63-68, Sept-Oct 2004
  • Killian, Caitlin.  “The Other Side of the Veil: North African Women in France Respond to the Headscarf Affair.”  Gender & Society, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 567-590, Aug 2003.
  • Charrad, “Veils and Laws:  Multiple Meanings of the Veil” (photocopied)
  • Charrad, “Women Ally with the Devil” (photocopied)

 News Media Articles:

  • Short articles from the New York Times and the BBC:  The text or link will be posted on Blackboard. 

 

  • The readings for the seminar are interdisciplinary, drawing on Sociology, Anthropology, and History.  They include two major books and a packet of recent articles.  The books are Women in the Middle East by renowned historian Nikki Keddie; Veiled Sentiments by Lila Abu Lughod, a leading anthropologist of gender; and Questioning the Veil by Marnia Lazreg, a prominent sociologist.  Placing the lives of women and the veil in historical context, the first book focuses on the diversity and richness of women’s experiences in the Middle East.  The second highlights how gender roles relate to the twin codes of honor and modesty as codes of behavior pervading the Middle East. It also shows how these codes translate into veiling The third addresses current debates surrounding the veil. Articles in the packet address the place of the veil in today’s ideologies and politics not only in the Islamic world, but also in the United States and Western Europe, where the headscarf has become an object of political confrontation.  From time to time, we use current newspaper articles or media segments in our discussions.

Audiovisuals:

Audiovisuals are used frequently during the semester to illustrate variations in the veil from Afghanistan to Morocco and elsewhere.  We see pictures of the veil in different countries, and videos on the hijab and debates on veiling.

Requirements:

The requirements for the seminar are a research paper and presentations on the readings.  The research paper is developed in stages during the course of the seminar on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor.  Students are encouraged to do research on a topic of interest. They may conduct the research on their own or in teams.  Examples of topics include veiling practices in a given country, laws on veiling (either forcing women to put on a veil as in Iran or to drop it as in Turkey), and interviews of women who wear a veil.

Framework for Research Papers:

There are three major forms of discourse for you to consider when you think about your research paper:  The discourse of individual women and men; the discourse of policy, law makers and other political groups; and the discourse of social scientists on the functions and meanings of the veil such as that of anthropologists, sociologists, historians, or political scientists.  In designing your research project, start by identifying the actors whose discourse you will study.  You may choose one or several sets of actors.

Note

Prominent scholars in the field and members of the Austin community engaged in relevant work will be invited as our guest lecturers.  The dates for their visit to the seminar will be announced in the course of the semester depending on their availability.  Updated versions of the syllabus will be provided on Blackboard in the course of the semester as needed.  Make sure to check.

Additional Information:

You are encouraged to study together and do collaborative projects, but anything you write can only be your own.

There will be no incomplete.

Keep on your computer and a back up device until the end of the semester a file of every piece of writing you hand in.

Excuses for absences will be considered only in rare, genuine circumstances and with proper medical documentation.

Attendance is mandatory; more than two unexcused absences will be reflected in the final grade.

There are no extra credit provisions for this course.

Wk 1 (Jan 25)

Class Discussion:

Images of Women in the Islamic World.  Why the fascination and the debates about the veil.

Wk 2 (Feb 1).  Women’s Dress and Morality

            Secor, Anna J. “The Veil and Urban Space in Istanbul: Women's Dress, Mobility and

Islamic Knowledge.”  Gender, Place and Culture, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 5-22, Mar 2002.

Atasoy, Yildiz.  “Governing Women's Morality: A Study of Islamic Veiling in Canada.” in  European Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 203-221, May 2006

Wk 3 (Feb 8).  The Headscarf Controversy

Carle, Robert.  “Hijab and the Limits of French Secular Republicanism.” Society, vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 63-68, Sept-Oct 2004

Killian, Caitlin.  “The Other Side of the Veil: North African Women in France Respond to the Headscarf Affair.”  Gender & Society, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 567-590, Aug 2003.

Wk 4 (Feb 15). Historical Overview from the Beginning of Islam to End of 18th Century

Keddie, Preface, Introduction, chs. 1, 2, 3.

Wk 5 (Feb 22).  The Veil in Nationalism, Women’s Movements and Islamism:  19th and 20th centuries.

            Keddie, Chs. 4,5,6, Conclusion.

Wk 6 (March 1).  ). Boundaries and Gender and Discussion of Sources on the Veil.

Shavarini, Mitra K  “Wearing the Veil to College: The Paradox of Higher Education in the Lives of Iranian Women.”   International Journal of Middle East Studies, vol. 38, no. 2, pp.189-211, May 2006.

Charrad, “Veils and Laws:  Multiple Meanings of the Veil” (photocopied)

Charrad, “Women Ally with the Devil” (photocopied)

Keddie, Book 2, Part I.

Locate at least 5 sources in print (books or articles in scholarly journals) and 5 on the web or in popular literature. 

Wk 7. March 8:  Guest lecture.  TBA.

March 15:  Spring break.

Wk 8 (March 22).  Identity in a Changing World

            Abu Lughod, Preface, Chs 1 and 2.

Outline of research project due (3 pages).  Indicate the topic, the main point you think you want to argue, the sections of your paper, the content of each section, your methodology, and at least 5 sources.

Wk 9 (March 29).  Honor and Sexuality

            Abu-Lughd, chs. 3 and 4

Guest lecture on sources and data bases by the PCL Middle East Research Librarian.  Bring your questions about your topic.

Wk 10 (April 5). Modesty and Marriage

Abu Lughod, chs 7, 8 and Appendix

First draft of paper due.  Discussion of research projects in class on March 25th.

Wk 11 (April 12). ): Cultural Identity

Lazreg, Introduction, Letters 1, 2, 3.

Wk 12 (Apr 19).  Current Debates and SimulationGame on Genderstan.

Articles on laws on veiling in countries of Europe and the Middle East from the New York Times and the BBC (posted on Blackboard).

Newly created nation-state of Genderstan is designing its policy on veils and women’s rights.  Debate on laws on veiling and women’s rights.

Prepare your arguments.  Anchor your position in the literature.  Select at least 2 of the sources we have read to support your position.

Lazreg, Letters 4, 5.

Wk 13 (April 26):  Presentations on Research Projects

Wk 14 (May 3).  Presentations on Research Projects

May 3:  Research Paper due.

Publications

Patrimonialism and Imperial Strategy, Mounira M. Charrad and Julia P. Adams, eds., Special Issue of Political Power and Social Theory, forthcoming.

 “Sustained Reforms of Islamic Family Law: Tunisia under Authoritarian Regimes, 1950s to 2010,” Mounira M. Charrad and Hyun Jeong Ha in Family Law and Gender in the Modern Middle East,Adrien Wing and Hisham Kassim (eds.), New York: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming.

"Patrimonialism, Past and Present:  An Introduction" Mounira M. Charrad and Julia P. Adams in Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams and Mounira M. Charrad, eds., Bol 636 of the Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences.  New York, NY:  Sage.  July 2011.

“Central and Local Patrimonialism:  State Building in Kin-Based Societies” in Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams and Mounira M. Charrad, eds, Vol. 636 of The Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. New York, NY: Sage, forthcoming in 2011.

Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams and Mounira M. Charrad, eds, Vol. 636 of The Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. New York, NY: Sage, forthcoming in 2011.

“Gender in the Middle East: Islam, States, Agency,” Annual Review of Sociology. Vol 37. Forthcoming 2011.

“Women’s Agency across Cultures:  Conceptualizing Strengths and Boundaries,” in Women’s Agency:  Silences and Voices, Special issue, Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 33 (6), December 2010.

Guest Editor, Women’s Agency: Silences and Voices, Special issue, Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 33 (6), December 2010.

“Kinship, Islam or Oil:  Culprits of Gender Inequality?” Politics and Gender (A Journal of the American Political Science Association). Vol. 5 (4), December 2009: 546-553.

“Tunisia at the Forefront of the Arab World:  Two Waves of Gender Legislation.”  Washington and Lee Law Review. Vol. 64 (4), Fall 2007:  1513-27 Revised and Reprinted in Women in the Middle East and North Africa: Agents of Change, edited by Fatima Sadiqi and Moha Ennaji.  New York: Routledge, 2010.

Charrad, M. (2007, September) Contexts, Concepts and Contentions: Gender Legislation in the Middle East. Hawwa: Journal of Women in the Middle East and the Islamic World, 5(1), 55-72.

Charrad, Mounira M. (2001) States and Women's Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Charrad, M. M. (1997, June) Policy Shifts: State, Islam and Gender in Tunisia, 1930s -- 1990s. Social Politics, 4(2), 284-319. Expanded s "Continuity or Change:  Family Law and Family Structure in Tunisia." with Allyson Goeken. In African Families at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century, ed.by Yaw Oheneba-Sakyi and Baffour K. Takyi. Westort, CT:  Praeger, 2006.  Revised and reprinted as "Family Law and Ideological Debates in Postcolonial Tunisia." in K.M. Yount and H. Rashad, eds. Family in the Middle East: Ideational Change in Egypt, Iran and Tunisia: Routledge, 2008.

Charrad, M. & Pieper, C. (2008, December) The Sociology of Islam: ASA Session Brings Fresh Perspective. Newsletter of the Sociology of Religion Section of the American Sociological Association, 9(2), 5-8.

Patrimonial States in Early Modern Europe and in the Contemporary Era: Similarities? Essay on the Familial State by J. Adams.  Poltiical Power and Social Theory.  2008. Vol 19: 243-251.

Charrad, M. (2007, September) Teaching Comparative and Historical Sociology: Challenges and New Directions. Trajectories, Newsletter of the Comparative and Historical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association, 19(1).

Charrad, M. (2007) Unequal Citizenship: Issues of Gender Justice in the Middle East and North Africa. In M. Mukhopadhyay (Ed.), Gender Justice, Citizenship and Development. Ottawa, Canada: International Development Research Centre.

Charrad, M. (2006, September) Waves of Comparative and Historical Sociology, Essay on Remaking Modernity. International Journal of Comparative Sociology, 47(5), 351-358.

Charrad, M. & Goeken, A. (2006) Continuity or Change: Family Law and Family Structure in Tunisia. In Y. Oheneba-Sakyi & B.K. Takyi (Eds.), African Families at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Charrad, M. (2006, March) Rulers and Families, Review essay on The Familial State: Ruling Families and Merchant Capitalism in Early Modern Europe. Comparative and Historical Sociology Section Newsletter 17(2).

Charrad, M. (2005, December) Broadening the Discourse: States in Kin-based Societies. Political Sociology: States, Power, and Societies, 12(1), 8-9.

Charrad, M. (2004, September) Code of Personal Status, Tunisia. Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa, 4 vols. 2d ed., Philip Mattar ed., Macmillan Reference USA, 2230-2231.

Charrad, M. (2003, March) Why study Colonialism?. Comparative and Historical Sociology, 15(1), 18-21.

"State and Gender in the Maghrib." In Women and Power in the Middle East, Suad Joseph and Susan Slyomovics, eds., Philadelphia:  University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001, pp. 61-71. Revised and Updated.  Initially published In Middle East Report, March-April, 1990, pp. 19-24.

Charrad, M. (2000) Becoming a Citizen: Lineage Versus Individual in Morocco and Tunisia. In S. Joseph (Ed.), Gender and Citizenship in the Middle East (pp.70-87). Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press.

Charrad, M. (1999, June) Bringing in Tribe: Beyond a State/Class Paradigm. Comparative and Historical Sociology, 11(3), 1-3.

Charrad, M. (1998) Cultural Diversity Within Islam: Veils and Laws in Tunisia. In H. Bodman & N. Tohidi (Eds.), Women in Muslim Societies: Diversity Within Unity (pp.63-79). Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner.

Charrad, M. (1996) Femmes, Culture et Societe. Casablanca, Morocco: Afrique Orient. Vol. 1.  Femmes, Culture et Famille.

Charrad, M. (1996) Femmes, Culture et Societe. Casablanca, Morocco: Afrique Orient. Vol. 2. Femmes, Pouvoir Politique et Developpement.

Charrad, M., Bourqia, R. & Gallagher, N. (1996) Femmes au Maghreb: Perspectives et Questions. In Femmes, Culture et Societe (pp.9-14). Casablanca, Morocco: Afrique Orient.

Charrad, M. (1995, November) Review of Gender and National Identity: Women and Politics in Muslim Societies. Contemporary Sociology 24(6).

Charrad, M. (1994) Repudiation versus Divorce: Responses to State Policy in Tunisia. In E. Chow & C. Berheide (Eds.), Women, the Family and Policy: A Global Perspective (pp.51-69). State University of New York Press.

Charrad, M. (1987, March) Review of Women and the Family in the Middle East: New Voices of Change. Contemporary Sociology 16(2).

Awards and Achievements

Selected professional and scholarly awards and achievements include:

Council Member (elected), Section on Comparative and Historical Sociology, American Sociological Association, 2011-14.

Editorial Board, Contemporary Sociology, 2011-present.

National Endowment for the Humanities, Faculty Fellowship for Research, Sept 2010-June 2011.

American Institute of Maghrebi Studies, Grant for Field Research in Tunisia, 2009- 2010.

Advisor, Survey of Women’s Rights in the Middle East and North Africa, Freedom House, New York, 2009 and 2004.

Distinguished Service to the Tunisian American Community Ibn Khaldun Award, 2005.  In recognition of “bringing a better understanding of Tunisian society, history, and culture to American universities, students, and educated public.”

Associate Editor, Editorial Board, Sociological Theory, 2006-Present.

Editorial Board, Politics and Gender, 2007-present

International Selection Committee, Middle East Research Competition, Ford Foundation, 2006-08.

Editorial Advisory Board, Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, 2004-present.

Distinguished Scholarly Book Award, American Sociological Association. 2004.

Best Book on Politics and History Greenstone Award, American Political Science Association. 2003.

Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Award. Outstanding Book in Political Sociology, American Sociological Association, Section on Political Sociology.

Outstanding Scholarly Book in Any Field Hamilton Award, University of Texas at Austin. 2002.

Best First Book in the Field of History Award, Phi Alpha Theta International Honor Society in History, 2002.

Best Book in Sociology Komarosvky Award, Honorable Mention, Eastern Sociological Society, 2003.

American Sociological Association-National Science Foundation Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline Grant, 2004.

Best Book in Sociology Komarosvky Award, Honorable Mention, Eastern Sociological Society, 2003.

Council Member (elected), Section on Comparative and Historical Sociology, American Sociological Association, December 1999-2003.

Board of Directors, American Institute of Maghribi Studies, 1999- 2003.                                        

Chair (elected), Faculty Advisory Committee (Editorial Board), University of Texas Press, 2006-07.

Honorary Member, Phi Alpha Theta International Honor Society in History, 2002 – present.

International Advisory Board Member, Journal of North African Studies, 1997-present.

 

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