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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

David Crew

Professor Ph.D., 1975, Cornell University

Distinguished Teaching Professor
David Crew

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Biography

Research interests

His current research and teaching interests include the history of popular culture and consumerism in twentieth-century Germany and Europe, the history and politics of memory, and the visual history of Germany in the twentieth century, with a specific focus upon photographic representations.

Courses taught

Twentieth Century Germany, Nazi Germany and the Holocaust, Germany since 1945. He has been a faculty member of the Normandy Scholar Program since 1993.

T C 357 • Remembering The Holocaust

43450 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CRD 007A
show description

Instructor: David F. Crew, Professor, Department of History

 

Description:

During the Holocaust, millions of European Jews were murdered by the Nazis, along with hundreds of thousands of physically and mentally handicapped persons, gays and Sinti and Roma.  Millions also died in Hitler’s murderous war in Russia. This course focuses upon the history of the Holocaust and its “afterlife.” We will examine how Germans and their victims, as well as post-war generations of Europeans and North Americans, have reacted to, dealt with, commemorated, and tried to understand these horrific crimes since 1945.  We will be exploring a variety of different “sites of memory”: academic history, personal memoirs, novels, monuments and museums, photography, documentary and fiction films about the Holocaust and also the Internet. Lastly, the course will emphasize the most recent history of the “afterlife” of the Holocaust since 1990.

 

Texts/Readings:

Saul Friedlander, The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945,Volume 2 (New York, 2007) Primo Levi, Survival in AuschwitzLawrence Langer, Holocaust Testimonies. The Ruins of Memory (1991)

James Young, The Texture of Memory. Holocaust Memorials and Meaning (1993) Anne Michaels, Fugitive Pieces(1998) Jan Gross, Neighbors. The Destruction of the Jewish Community in Jedwabne, Poland (2001)

 

Assignments:

3 critical essays (6-8 pages each) - 60%

Proposal for a memorial, documentary, or web site (4-5 pages) - 15%

Holocaust Photograph analysis (2-3 pages) - 10%

Class participation - 15%

 

About the Professor:

David Crew holds the title of Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Department of History. His current research and teaching interests include the history of popular culture and consumerism in twentieth-century Germany and Europe, the history and politics of memory, and the visual history of Germany in the twentieth century, with a specific focus upon photographic representations.  Professor Crew received his Ph.D. in 1975 from Cornell University.

T C 357 • Remembering The Holocaust

43030 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CRD 007A
show description

During the Holocaust, millions of European Jews were murdered by the Nazis, along with hundreds of thousands of physically and mentally handicapped persons, gays and Sinti and Roma.  Millions also died in Hitler’s murderous war in Russia. This course focuses upon the history of the Holocaust and its “afterlife.” We will examine how Germans and their victims, as well as post-war generations of Europeans and North Americans, have reacted to, dealt with, commemorated, and tried to understand these horrific crimes since 1945.  We will be exploring a variety of different “sites of memory”: academic history, personal memoirs, novels, monuments and museums, photography, documentary and fiction films about the Holocaust and also the Internet. Lastly, the course will emphasize the most recent history of the “afterlife” of the Holocaust since 1990.

Texts/Readings:

Saul Friedlander, The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945,Volume 2 (New York, 2007)

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz

Lawrence Langer, Holocaust Testimonies. The Ruins of Memory (1991)

James Young, The Texture of Memory. Holocaust Memorials and Meaning (1993)

Anne Michaels, Fugitive Pieces (1998)

Jan Gross, Neighbors. The Destruction of the Jewish Community in Jedwabne, Poland (2001)

Assignments:

3 critical essays (6-8 pages each)                                                        60%

Proposal for a memorial, documentary, or web site (4-5 pages)              15%

Holocaust Photograph analysis (2-3 pages)                                           10%

Class participation                                                                              15%

About the Professor:

David Crew holds the title of Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Department of History. His current research and teaching interests include the history of popular culture and consumerism in twentieth-century Germany and Europe, the history and politics of memory, and the visual history of Germany in the twentieth century, with a specific focus upon photographic representations.  Professor Crew received his Ph.D. in 1975 from Cornell University.

 

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