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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Robert Crosnoe

Professor Ph.D., Stanford

Professor of Sociology; Elsie and Stanley E. (Skinny) Adams, Sr. Centennial Professor in Liberal Arts
Robert Crosnoe

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Biography

Rob Crosnoe received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Stanford University and then completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Carolina Population Center and the Center for Developmental Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  His main research area is the life course and human development; specifically, the connections among children’s and adolescents’ health, psychosocial development, and educational trajectories and how these connections contribute to population-level inequalities (e.g., race, social class, immigration).

Dr. Crosnoe's books include:

Gordon, Rachel, Robert Crosnoe, and Xue Wang. 2013. Physical Attractiveness and the Accumulation of Social and Human Capital in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Assets and Distractions. Ann Arbor, MI: Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development.

Crosnoe, Robert. 2011. Fitting In, Standing Out: Navigating the Social Challenges of High School to Get an Education. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Crosnoe, Robert. 2006. Mexican Roots, American Schools: Helping Mexican Immigrant Children Succeed. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press.

Recent articles include:

Crosnoe, Robert, Kate Chambers Pickett, Chelsea Smith, and Shannon Cavanagh. 2014. “Changes in Young Children’s Family Structures and Child Care Arrangements.” Demography 51: 459–483.

Crosnoe, Robert, Jennifer Augustine, and Aletha C. Huston. 2012. “Children’s Early Child Care and
Mother’s Later Involvement with Schools.” Child Development 83: 758–772.

Crosnoe, Robert and Carey E. Cooper. 2010. “Economically Disadvantaged Children’s Transitions into Elementary School: Linking Family Processes, School Contexts, and Educational Policy.” American Educational Research Journal 47: 258-291.

Crosnoe, Robert. 2009. “Low-Income Students and the Socioeconomic Composition of Public High Schools.” American Sociological Review 74: 709-730.

Crosnoe, Robert, Kenneth Frank, and Ann Strassman Mueller. 2008. “Gender, Body Size, and Social Relations in American High Schools.” Social Forces 86: 1189-1216.

Crosnoe, Robert and Aletha C. Huston. 2007. “Socioeconomic Status, Schooling, and the Developmental Trajectories of Adolescents.” Developmental Psychology 43: 1097-1110.

Recent reviews and policy briefs include:

Crosnoe, Robert and Aprile Benner. (in press). “Children at School.” In Handbook of Child Psychology and Developmental Science, Vol. 4: Ecological Settings and Processes, edited by Marc Bornstein & Tama Leventhal (series editor: Richard M. Lerner). New York: Wiley.

Robert Crosnoe and Monica Kirkpatrick Johnson. 2011. “Research on Adolescence in the 21st Century.” Annual Review of Sociology 37: 439-460.

Crosnoe, Robert and Ruth Lopez-Turley. 2011. “The K-12 Educational Outcomes of Immigrant Youth.” Future of Children 21: 129-152.

Crosnoe, Robert and Shannon E. Cavanagh. 2010. “Families with Children and Adolescents: A Review, Critique, and Future Agenda.” Journal of Marriage and Family 72: 1-18.

Crosnoe, Robert. 2010. “Two Generation Strategies and Involving Immigrant Parents in Children’s Education.” Policy Brief for Urban Institute. http://www.urban.org/publications/412204.html

This research has been supported by several current or past grants from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development as well as from the William T. Grant Scholars Program and the Foundation for Child Development Changing Faces of American Children Scholars Program. Professor Crosnoe is also a member of several research groups, including the NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, the Collaborative on the Analysis of Pathways from Childhood to Adulthood, and the Institute of Medicine Study Group on Young Adult Health and Safety. In recent years, he has won early career awards from the Society for Research in Child Development, the Society for Research on Human Development, and the Children and Youth Section of the American Sociological Association.

Professor Crosnoe teaches Introduction to Sociology, Sociology of the Family, and Difficult Dialogues: Race and Social Policy in the U.S. on the undergraduate level. He is also faculty member in the Children and Society Bridging Disciplines Program for undergraduates at UT.

NIH Biosketch

NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

Collaborative on the Analysis of Pathways from Childhood to Adulthood

Interests

Human Development, Education, Family, Health, Immigration

T C 302 • Childhd & Adoles In Amer Socty

42930 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 930am-1100am CRD 007A
show description

The human life course is divided into meaningful stages, from infancy to the later years.  Childhood and adolescence are two such stages, and both are interesting for several reasons.  First, they differ from other stages in terms of dependence, responsibility, and expectations.  Second, they are training grounds for adult society, so that experiences in these early stages can structure subsequent pathways in positive and negative ways.  Third, they are both largely social constructions, meaning that the taken for granted rules, norms, and values associated with these two stages are created and shaped by larger social contexts and vary considerably across time and place.  In this course, we will explore these issues in depth by mixing scientific evidence with narrative accounts about child and adolescent life.  The semester will be broken down into 3 general areas.  We will begin by talking about the different meanings of childhood and adolescence, turn to discussing variation in the experiences of children and adolescents across the social structure (e.g., race, class, and gender), and end with an examination of how social contexts (e.g., family, school, peer group) influence youth development.

Texts/Readings:

The Body Project: An Intimate History of American Girls

      Joan Jacobs Brumberg, 1998, Vantage Books

There are No Children Here: The Story of Two Boys Growing Up in the Other America

      Alex Kotlowitz, 1992, Alfred A. Knopf

Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life

      Annette Lareau, 2003, University of California Press

 

Assignments:

10%    Class participation

40%    Two short essays (3-4 pages).  These essays are thought pieces.  Assigned topics integrate class discussion and readings and call for students’ own perceptions and opinions.

20%    One oral presentation and write-up.  The topic, chosen and researched by the student, should deal with an area of youth development that requires more study or intervention.

5%      Attendance at University Lecture Series and University Gem

25%    Take-home final examination

 

About the Professor:

A Plan II alum (1994), Professor Robert Crosnoe received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Stanford University and held a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in demography (the study of populations) and developmental psychology (the study of how people develop from birth to death) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill before returning to Austin as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology in 2001.  As a fellow at the Population Research Center, he conducts research on childhood, adolescence, and adulthood with an emphasis on education and the family.  Of particular interest is the phenomenon of resilience—how people succeed in life despite difficult circumstances.  Professor Crosnoe has two young children himself, a son and a daughter.

T C 302 • Childhd & Adoles In Amer Socty

42765 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 930am-1100am CRD 007B
show description

This course has a writing flag.

Description:

The human life course is divided into meaningful stages, from infancy to the later years. Childhood and adolescence are two such stages, and both are interesting for several reasons.  First, they differ from other stages in terms of dependence, responsibility, and expectations.  Second, they are training grounds for adult society, so that experiences in these early stages can structure subsequent pathways in positive and negative ways.  Third, they are both largely social constructions, meaning that the taken for granted rules, norms, and values associated with these two stages are created and shaped by larger social contexts and vary considerably across time and place.  In this course, we will explore these issues in depth by mixing scientific evidence with narrative accounts about child and adolescent life.  The semester will be broken down into 3 general areas.  We will begin by taking about the different meanings of childhood and adolescence , turn to discussing variation in the experiences of children and adolescents across the social structure (e.g., race, class, and gender), and end with an examination of how social contexts (e.g., family, school, peer group) influence youth development.

 

Readings:

The Body Project: An Intimate History of American Girls

Joan Jacobs Brumberg, 1998, Vantage Books

There are No Children Here: The Story of Two Boys Growing Up in the Other America

Alex Kotlowitz, 1992, Alfred A. Knopf

A Tribe Apart: A Journey Into the Heart of American Adolescence

Patricia Hersch, 1993, Ballantine

One course reader (primary sources from sociologists, psychologists, and educational researchers studying childhood and adolescence)

 

Requirements:

45%            Three short essays (3-4 pages).  These essays are thought pieces, each dealing with a specific section of the class.  Assigned topics integrate class discussion and readings and call for students’ own perceptions and opinions.

25%            One final examination (essay, cumulative)

15%            One oral presentation.  The topic, chosen and researched by the student, should deal with an area of youth development that requires more study or intervention.

15%            Class participation

 

About the Professor:

A Plan II alum (1994), Professor Robert Crosnoe received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Stanford University and held a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in demography (the study of populations) and developmental psychology (the study of how people develop from birth to death) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill before returning to Austin as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology in 2001.  As a fellow at the Population Research Center, he conducts research on childhood, adolescence, and adulthood with an emphasis on education and the family.  Of particular interest is the phenomenon of resilience—how people succeed in life despite difficult circumstances.  Beyond research, Professor Crosnoe loves baseball, dogs, Coca-Cola, and books.

UGS 303 • Difficult Dialog: Race/Policy

63950 • Spring 2010
Meets M 200pm-500pm GAR 1.134
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See attached syllabus in pdf form.

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