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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

David E. Adelman

Professor PHD

Contact

Biography

 

David E. Adelman teaches and writes in the areas of environmental law, intellectual property law, and climate change policy. Professor Adelman’s research focuses on the many interfaces between law and science. His articles have addressed such topics as the implications of emerging genomic technologies for toxics regulation, the tensions between legal and scientific evidentiary standards in regulatory decision making, and development of effective policies for promoting innovation relevant to addressing climate change. Professor Adelman clerked for the Honorable Samuel Conti of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California. Before entering academia, he was an associate with the law firm Covington & Burling in Washington, D.C., where he litigated patent disputes and provided counsel on environmental regulatory matters, and a Senior Attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council also in Washington, D.C. Professor Adelman was an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Arizona Rogers College of Law from 2001 to 2009.

T C 357 • Climate Change And Policy

43470 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CRD 007B
show description

Climate Change Law, Science & Policy

Description:

The distinctive attributes of climate change—global scale, scientific complexity, number and variety of contributing sources, and the delayed onset of its major impacts—make it a supremely difficult environmental problem to address.  The course will begin with an initial introduction to climate change science, economics, and policy.  It will then examine a series of specific topics, including the debate over the reliability of climate change science, the virtues of different legal regimes at the national and international levels, the status of international negotiations following the failure of the Copenhagen Summit in 2009, and the value of technology policies as a mechanism for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions.  Students will leave this course with an understanding of the sources and impacts of climate change, the primary areas of controversy, the major national and international legal regimes, and the many challenges to and opportunities for climate change mitigation.    

 

Texts/Readings:

Michael Gerrard. Global Climate Change and U.S. Law (2007).

The readings in Gerrard will be supplemented by articles drawn from legal, scientific, economic, and policy journals.

 

Assignments:

Class Participation: 20%

Seminar Presentation: 10%

Term Paper: 40%

Short Reaction Papers: 30%

 

About the Professor:

Professor Adelman earned his B.A. at Reed College in chemistry and physics, completed his Ph.D. in chemistry at Stanford University, and obtained his J.D. from Stanford Law School. Before entering academia, he was a Senior Attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council in Washington, D.C., and an associate with the law firm Covington & Burling also in Washington, D.C.

Professor Adelman teaches and writes in the areas of environmental law, intellectual property law, and climate change policy. Professor Adelman’s research focuses on the many interfaces between law and science. His articles have addressed such topics as the implications of emerging genomic technologies for toxics regulation, the tensions between legal and scientific evidentiary standards in regulatory decision making, and development of effective policies for promoting the development of new technologies essential to mitigating climate change.

T C 357 • Climate Change Law/Sci/Policy

43100 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CRD 007A
show description

Climate Change Law, Science & Policy

Description:

The distinctive attributes of climate change—global scale, scientific complexity, number and variety of contributing sources, and the delayed onset of its major impacts—make it a supremely difficult environmental problem to address.  The course will begin with an initial introduction to climate change science, economics, and policy.  It will then examine a series of specific topics, including the debate over the reliability of climate change science, the virtues of different legal regimes at the national and international levels, the status of international negotiations following the failure of the Copenhagen Summit in 2009, and the value of technology policies as a mechanism for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions.  Students will leave this course with an understanding of the sources and impacts of climate change, the primary areas of controversy, the major national and international legal regimes, and the many challenges to and opportunities for climate change mitigation.    

 

Texts/Readings:

Michael Gerrard. Global Climate Change and U.S. Law (2007).

The readings in Gerrard will be supplemented by articles drawn from legal, scientific, economic, and policy journals.

 

Assignments:

Class Participation: 20%

Seminar Presentation: 10%

Term Paper: 40%

Short Reaction Papers: 30%

 

About the Professor:

Professor Adelman earned his B.A. at Reed College in chemistry and physics, completed his Ph.D. in chemistry at Stanford University, and obtained his J.D. from Stanford Law School. Before entering academia, he was a Senior Attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council in Washington, D.C., and an associate with the law firm Covington & Burling also in Washington, D.C.

Professor Adelman teaches and writes in the areas of environmental law, intellectual property law, and climate change policy. Professor Adelman’s research focuses on the many interfaces between law and science. His articles have addressed such topics as the implications of emerging genomic technologies for toxics regulation, the tensions between legal and scientific evidentiary standards in regulatory decision making, and development of effective policies for promoting the development of new technologies essential to mitigating climate change.

 

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