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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Glenn Masada

Professor

Biography

Dr. Glenn Y. Masada earned his Sc.D. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1980. He joined the faculty of The University of Texas at Austin the same year. He is affiliated with the Dynamic Systems and Control program.

Dr. Masada researches the design, control and optimization of energy conversion systems. He develops mathematical models and control strategies for electric-generating power plant boilers, hybrid ground-source heat pump systems, isolated microgrids, and other thermal systems to increase their thermal efficiency, reliability and transient performance.

Research interests:

  • System dynamics
  • Automatic control
  • Energy conversion engineering
  • Mechatronics

Most Recent Publications

  1. Gwak, K.W., Masada, G.Y., "Nonlinear Optimal Control of an Input-Constrained and Enclosed Thermal Processing System," International Journal Of Control, Automation And Systems, Vol. 6, (2008), 2, pp. 160-170
  2. Gwak, K.W. and Masada, G.Y., "Structural Design and Optimization of Nonlinear Control Systems using the Linear Algebraic Equivalence of a Nonlinear Controller," ASME Journal Of Dynamic Systems, Measurement And Control, Vol. 127, (2005), 1, pp. 105-113
  3. Gwak, K.W. and Masada, G.Y., "Regularization Embedded Nonlinear Control Designs for Ill-Conditioned Thermal Processes," ASME Journal Of Dynamic Systems, Measurement And Control, Vol. 126, (2004), 3, pp. 574-582
  4. Buckner, G., Fernandez, B. and Masada, G.Y., "Intelligent Sliding Mode Control of Cutting Force during Single-point Turning Operations," ASME Journal Of Manufacturing Science And Engineering, Vol. 123, (2001), 2, pp. 206-213
  5. Mittal, S., Masada, G., and Bergman, T., "The Mechanical Response of PCB Assemblies During Infrared Reflow Soldering," IEEE Transactions On Components, Packaging, And Manufacturing Technology, Part A, Vol. 19, (March 1996), 1, pp. 127-133
  6. Leifer, J., Masada, G., and Busch-Vishniac, I., "Finite Element Simulation of a Nondestructive Shear Test for TAB Bonds," IEEE Transactions On Semiconductor Manufacturing, Vol. 8, (August 1995), 3, pp. 352-359
  7. Lee, F.S., Moon, T., and Masada, G., "Extended Bond Graph Reticulation of Piezoelectric Continua," ASME Journal Of Dynamic Systems, Measurement And Control, Vol. 117, (March 1995), pp. 1-7
  8. Kim, Y., Pavuluri, J., White, J., Busch-Vishniac, I., and Masada, G., "Thermocompression Bonding Effects on Bump-Pad Adhesion," IEEE Transactions On Components, Packaging, And Manufacturing Technology, Part B, Vol. 189, (February 1995), 1, pp. 192-200
  9. Lee, F.S., Moon, T., and Masada, G., "Extended Bond Graph Reticulation of Magnetostrictive Continua," Journal Of Applied Physics, Vol. 75, (May 1994), 9, pp. 1-8
  10. Yen, C. and Masada, G., "Dynamic Analysis of Flexible Bodies Using Extended Bond Graphs," ASME Journal Of Dynamic Systems, Measurement And Control, Vol. 116, (March 1994), pp. 66-72

T C 357 • Sci/Eco/Polit Of Energy Prod-W

43610 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm ETC 2.140
show description

TC 357
SCIENCE, ECONOMICS AND POLITICS OF ENERGY PRODUCTION
Spring 2010 Syllabus
 
 
COURSE NUMBER: TC 357 (unique no. 43610)
 
MEETING TIME T-Th 12:30-2:00PM
& PLACE: ETC 2.140
 
INSTRUCTORS: Prof. Glenn Y. Masada, Sc.D., P.E.
 Prof. Tess J. Moon, Ph.D., P.E.
 
OFFICE HOURS: Masada ETC 4.144, T-Th 11:00-12:15 or by appointment
 Moon ETC 4.170, T-Th 2:00-3:15pm or by appointment
 
CONTACT masada@mail.utexas.edu, (512) 471-3061 p, (512) 471-8727 f
INFORMATION: tmoon@mail.utexas.edu, (512) 471-0094 p, (512) 471-8727 f
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
A detailed examination—from an engineering perspective—of various select aspects of the
science, technology, economics and politics of non-renewable and renewable energy production
and distribution. Renewable energy sources, e.g. wind, solar, geothermal, hydro, plants, bacteria, as
well as non-renewable energy sources, e.g. oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, are potential discussion
and research paper topics.
 
PREREQUISITES:  For Plan II majors, upper-division standing.
 
TEXT:  
No specific text; readings will be from a variety of primary and secondary sources, e.g. course
blackboard site; daily reading of the Wall Street Journal (paper or on-line version) for pertinent
material; selected viewing of on-line videos (e.g. PBS Nova, Frontline).
 
COURSE ACTIVITIES:
Class 1-21: Faculty presentations; Faculty- and student-led discussions
Class 3:  Research paper: Thesis statement & outline due
Class 14:  Research paper: Primary & secondary sources, references due
Class 20:  Research paper: Rough draft due
Class 20-24: Student Presentations & written peer critiques
Class 24:  Research paper: Written critiques of peer’s rough drafts due
Class 29-30: Student-led discussions; course evaluation
Class 30:  Research paper: Final version due
 
GRADING:   
Class participation & daily assignments .......................................................... 20%
Written critiques of peer’s work ....................................................................   25%
Presentation & leading discussion on thesis topic  .......................................... 15%
Research Paper................................................................................................  40%
  Total  100%
CLASS PARTICIPATION:
In order to promote an “active learning” class environment, in addition to the topics and problems
that Profs. Masada and Moon present, students will actively participate in class, regularly and
openly debating and critically analyzing the issue(s) under discussion. Students should be mindful
of the fact that with respect to contributed arguments: their relative quality, strength and validity are as important as their quantity. Students are expected to review materials prior to classes in
order to actively participate in the subsequent class discussions.
 
PRESENTATION & PAPER AS ALTERNATIVE TO FINAL EXAM:
Students will make a 20-25 minute presentation on and lead the subsequent 5-10 minute class
discussion on their thesis topic, as well as write a formal 30-40 page research paper. Nominally,
there will be two student presentations per class.
 
ATTENDANCE:
Attendance will be taken and recorded for all classes, including the student presentations at the end
of the semester. Attendance will be part of the class participation grade; no more than three
excused absences will be allowed.
 
SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY:
Any plagiarism or cheating will be referred to the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs to be
handled according to The University’s scholastic dishonesty policy.
 
STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic adjustments for
qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of
Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TDD or the College of Engineering Director of Students with
Disabilities at 471-4321.
 
MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION CENTER:
The Measurement and Evaluation Center forms for the Cockrell School of Engineering will be
used during the last week of class to evaluate the course and the instructors.  Other forms of course
evaluation may also be used.
 
UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE POLICIES:
See the College website. http://www.engr.utexas.edu/students/handbook/index.cfm for general
policy on student conduct.
 
IN-CLASS POLICY:
You are welcome to enjoy any beverage in class, but please refrain from eating, talking, texting,
web-surfing extensively or reading the Daily Texan (if you really need to do these, please step
outside and rejoin us when you are finished.)

TC 357
SCIENCE, ECONOMICS AND POLITICS OF ENERGY PRODUCTION
Spring 2010
 
Potential Discussion & Thesis Topics
 
 
1. Science
 Basic reactants & products
 Relative availability/scarcity
 Mechanism(s)
 Safety/Toxicity
 Storage/Portability
 “Robustness”
 Broadness of uses/applicability
 Relative efficiency
  Production- (or Local-) Level
  System- (or End-Use) level
 Scalability  
 
2. Economics
 “Costs”
 Production
 Environmental
 Opportunity
 Capital Investment
 Availability of Venture Capital
 Business Opportunities
Gov. intervention/incentives
Government Subsidies
 Infrastructure Costs/Availability
 Smart Grid
 Competitive Renewable Energy Zones
 Conservation
 Demand Response
 Distributed Energy
3. Politics
 Governmental Regulation/Taxation
 Subsidies
 “Ownership”
 Global vs. Local Availability
 Ethics
 
4. Non-Renewable Energy Sources
 Fossil fuels
 Oil
 Natural gas
 Coal
 Nuclear
 
5. Renewable Energy Sources
Wind  
Solar  
Photovoltaics
Concentrated Solar
Solar-Thermal
Fuel Cells
Biofuels/Biomass
Geothermal
Hydro
Tidal/Wave
Energy Storage
 
 
 TC 357
SCIENCE, ECONOMICS AND POLITICS OF ENERGY PRODUCTION
 
Weekly Schedule for Spring 2010
 
Tuesday Notable(s) Thursday Notable(s)
Jan. 19 Course Introduction Jan. 21  
Jan. 26 Thesis Statement & Outline Due
!
 Jan. 28
!
Peer Feedback Forms Due
Feb. 2
!
Faculty & Peer Feedback Forms Returned Feb. 4  
Feb. 9  Feb. 11  
Feb. 16  Feb. 18  
Feb. 23  Feb. 25  
Mar. 2  Mar. 4 Primary/Secondary Sources Due
"
 
Mar. 9
"
Peer Feedback Forms Due Mar. 11
"
Faculty & Peer Feedback Forms Returned
Mar. 16 Spring Break Mar. 18 Spring Break
Mar. 23  Mar. 25  
Mar. 30  Apr. 1 Research Paper Rough Draft Due
Apr. 6  Apr. 8 Student Presentations
Apr. 13 Student Presentations Apr.  15 Student Presentations
#
 Peer Written Critiques Due
Apr. 20 Student Presentations
#
Faculty & Peer Written Critiques Due Apr. 22 Student Presentations
Apr. 27 Student Presentations Apr. 29 Student Presentations
May 4 Student-Led Discussion May 6 Research Paper Final Version Due
Thesis topic must be selected by January 26, and presentation time slot must be selected by March 9.
All rough drafts are due on April 1, regardless of oral presentation and discussion date. Written
feedback of peer’s presentations are due when they are presented and discussed in class.

TC 357
SCIENCE, ECONOMICS AND POLITICS OF ENERGY PRODUCTION
 
Tentative Topical Schedule for Spring 2010
 
Tuesday Class Topic Thursday Class Topic
Jan. 19 Energy: Introduction & Overview Jan. 21 Energy: Introduction & Overview
Jan. 26 Wind  Jan. 28 Wind  
Feb. 2 Solar  Feb. 4 Solar
Feb. 9 Fuel Cells Feb. 11 Biofuels
Feb. 16 Biofuels Feb. 18 Geothermal
Feb. 23 Hydro/Tidal/Wave Feb. 25 Oil
Mar. 2 Natural Gas Mar. 4 Coal
Mar. 9 Nuclear Mar. 11 Energy Storage/Transmission
Mar. 15 Spring Break Mar. 18 Spring Break
Mar. 23 Conservation Mar. 25 “Energy Mix”: Environmental Issues
Mar. 30 “Energy Mix”: Societal Issues Apr. 1 “Energy Mix”: Political Issues
Apr. 6 “Sustainable Energy Future” Apr. 8 Student Presentations
Apr. 13 Student Presentations Apr. 15 Student Presentations
Apr. 20 Student Presentations Apr. 22 Student Presentations
Apr. 27 Student Presentations Apr. 29 Student Presentations
May 4 Student-Led Discussion May 6 Student-Led Discussion
 

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