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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Michael P Harney

Associate Professor Ph.D.-Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley

Michael P Harney

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Biography

Michael Harney. Born Vancouver, BC., 1948. EDUCATION: B.A. English, UCLA, 1971; M.A. Comparative Literature, Univ. California, 1975; Ph.D. Comparative Literature, Univ. California, 1983. EMPLOYMENT: Univ. Texas-Austin, 1986 to present. ADMINISTRATIVE: Grad. Chair, UT Span. & Port. (2004-2008); Acting Dept. Chair, UT Span. & Port. (Fall 2001); Program Director, Grad. Chair, UT Comparative Lit. Program (1998-2001); Faculty Council, Univ. Texas-Austin (2003-2004); Chair, MLA Div. Span. Medieval Lang. & Lit. (2003); Exec. Committee, MLA Div. Span. Medieval Lang. & Lit. (2000-2004). PUBLICATIONS: The Epic of the Cid, translation & edition (Hackett 2011); Kinship & Marriage in Medieval Hispanic Chivalric Romance (Brepols, 2001); Kinship & Polity in the "Poema de Mio Cid" (Purdue Univ. Press, 1993).

Interests

Medieval & Early Modern literature & culture. Film and media.

T C 357 • Reading Don Quijote

42910 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CRD 007B
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Description: A course devoted to a close reading of the entire text of Cervantes's Don Quijote. Most literary historians consider this book to be the first modern novel. Many famous novelists in the four centuries since its publication regard it as their favorite. It is a long novel (more or less a thousand pages in the typical edition).  We will read the whole book in the course of the fifteen-week semester. By close reading is meant an approach that focuses on precise understanding of the text. The professor teaching this course believes that one must first read the lines before reading between them. At the same time, the project of reading a work so rich in cultural and literary references has to be enhanced by frequent discussion of historical, literary, philosophical, folkloric, linguistic, ethnographic, and sociological background. You have to learn a lot about Golden Age Spain and Early Modern Europe to get the vast and complicated joke of this novel. We will therefore digress as often as is convenient, explaining recondite details and pointing out parallels and analogies as best we can. In addition, we will read one work of criticism: Mikhail Bakhtin's The World of Rabelais. The latter work offers a theory that explains the cultural spirit of Cervantes, and his time, place, and people. At the same time, it situates Don Quijote in a literary, folkloric, and cultural tradition that stretches back thousands of years, while looking forward to our own world, a reality in many ways preconditioned by that of Imperial Spain.

Texts/Readings:Don Quijote

Assignments:2 quizzes                        10%

1 mid-term with take-home essay        20%

1 final exam with essay            30%

Research prospectus                5%

15-page research paper                35%

About the Professor:

Michael Harney received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. 

He specializes in
Medieval Peninsular Literature
and Golden Age Peninsular Literature, and his
research interests include
Medieval and Renaissance Spanish Literature, Comparative literature, literary theory, and cultural theory.

In addition to the Don Quijote TC, he teaches Advanced Grammar and Composition I.

T C 357 • Travel, Tourism, And Herodotus

42890 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm CRD 007B
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This course has a writing flag.

Description:

This course has several objectives. The first is to read the entire text of the Histories of Herodotus of Halicarnassus. This is one of the best and most widely read works in the history of writing. Pick your top ten authors: chances are, all or most have read and loved this work. Herodotus is one of those writers who entertains while instructing. Called by some the father of history, by others the father of lies, he is above all a yarn spinner. His book is full of anecdotes, tales, myths, reports. A polymathic and highly digressive gossip, he is curious about everything. You could call him the father of ethnography, geography, travel writing, tourist guides, and the literature of exploration and conquest. If he were brought back to life, one would think he would host a talk show of some kind. Maybe something like: “Geography Tonight: Up Close and Personal.”

In addition to reading and discussing this great book, we will also read excerpts from the many writers who have carried on the Herodotean tradition. These include Pausanias, the author of the earliest extant tourist guide; the geographer Strabo; the medieval Jewish traveler Benjamin of Tudela; Marco Polo; early-modern Spanish travel writers, including Cervantes; travel writers of the 18th and 19th centuries, including Sir Richard Burton (famous seeker of the Nile's source); 20th-century travel writers like T. E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) and Alan Moorehead (author of The White Nile).

 

Texts/Readings:

REQUIRED:

1. Herodotus, Histories (electronic edition, provided by instructor)

2. Electronic reader of textual excerpts.

RECOMMENDED (to be put on reserve, PCL):

François Hartog, The Mirror of Herodotus: the Representation of the Other in the Writing of History.

Alan Moorehead, The White Nile

T. E. Lawrence, Seven Pilars of Wisdom.

Rosaria Vignolo Munson, Telling Wonders: Ethnographic and Political Discourse in the Work of Herodotus.

Rosalind Thomas, Herodotus in Context : Ethnography, Science and the Art of Persuasion.

 

Assignments:

TESTS: 

2 QUIZZES (5%)

1 MID-TERM with take-home essay component (15%)

1 FINAL EXAM with essay component (25%).

MT, FINAL & QUIZZES are open-book essay exams, & include ID's terminological definitions, and brief essays.

PAPERS:

1 3-page research prospectus (1 rewrite, 5%)

1 5-page expanded prospectus (1 rewrite, 10%)

1 15-page final research paper (1 rewrite, 30%)

Note 1: The first two prospectuses, each rewritten once, develop the concept, bibliography, and analytical structure of the final research project.

Note 2: "Excellent" writing means 2 things: 1. error-free style and language; 2. an expository essay that defends a thesis (i.e., that proves a point). Mere BOOK REPORTS do not constitute excellent writing.

Note 3: For purposes of this class, a PAGE of student writing = 250 words.

PRESENTATION: 1 10-minute oral presentation (with Q & A; 10%)

 

About the Professor

Michael Harney received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. 

He specializes in
Medieval Peninsular Literature
and Golden Age Peninsular Literature, and his
research interests include
Medieval and Renaissance Spanish Literature, Comparative literature, literary theory, and cultural theory.

In addition to the Don Quijote TC, he teaches Advanced Grammar and Composition I. 

T C 357 • Reading Don Quijote-W

43825 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm CRD 007A
show description

FALL 2009
PLAN II T C 357 
READING DON QUIJOTE-W 
 
UNIQUE #  43825
MEETING: MWF 12:00 – 1:00 CRD 007A
PROF:  MICHAEL HARNEY [Dept. of Spanish & Portuguese]
  3.148 BEN /  232-7143 / harney@mail.utexas.edu / OFFICE HRS: MW 1-1:30; F 1-3 
 
          
DESCRIPTION
A course devoted to a close reading of the entire text of Cervantes's Don Quijote. Most literary historians
consider this book to be the first modern novel. Many famous novelists in the four centuries since its
publication regard it as their favorite. It is a long novel (more or less a thousand pages in the typical
edition). We will read the whole book in the course of the fifteen-week semester. By CLOSE READING
is meant an approach that focuses on precise understanding of the text. The professor teaching this course
believes that one must first READ THE LINES before reading BETWEEN them. At the same time, the
project of reading a work so rich in cultural and literary references has to be enhanced by frequent
discussion of historical, literary, philosophical, folkloric, linguistic, ethnographic, and sociological
background. You have to learn a lot about Golden Age Spain and Early Modern Europe to get the vast
and complicated joke of this novel. We will therefore digress as often as is convenient, explaining
recondite details and pointing out parallels and analogies as best we can. In addition, we will refer
frequently to one optional but highly recommended work of criticism: Mikhail Bakhtin's The World of
Rabelais. The latter work offers a theory that explains the cultural spirit of Cervantes, and his time, place,
and people. At the same time, it situates Don Quijote in a literary, folkloric, and cultural tradition that
stretches back thousands of years, while looking forward to our own world, a reality in many ways
preconditioned by that of Imperial Spain.
 
GRADING SYSTEM1
 
TESTS:  2 QUIZZES (10%); 1 MID-TERM with take-home essay component (15%); one FINAL EXAM
with essay component (20%). MT, FINAL & QUIZZES are open-book essay exams, & include ID's
terminological definitions, and brief essays. 
PAPERS: 1 750-word research prospectus (1 rewrite, 5%); 1 1250-word expanded prospectus (1 rewrite,
10%); 1 3000-word final research paper (1 rewrite, 35%)
ATTENDANCE: (5%). All students are expected to participate actively in class discussions. Attendance is
taken each class day at 12:30 PM. Three unexcused absences are allowed. Each additional unexcused absence
will result in a 1% deduction from the final course grade average, up to 5%. 
Note 1: The first two prospectuses, each rewritten once, develop the concept, bibliography, and analytical
structure of the final research project. 
Note 2: "Excellent" writing means 2 things: 1. error-free style and language; 2. an expository essay that defends
a thesis (i.e., that proves a point). Mere BOOK REPORTS do not constitute excellent writing.
Note 3: Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final course grade. 
TEXTS.  REQUIRED: 1. Don Quijote (electronic edition, provided by instructor).
RECOMMENDED: 1. Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World; 2. Penguin  Dictionary of
Literary Terms & Literary Theory (or similar reference work).
                                                
1 COURSE SATISFIES SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT REQUIREMENTS.

DETAILED SYLLABUS
ASSIGNED READINGS,QUIZZES, EXAMS, DEADLINES, ETC. 
 
 
WED 26 AUG FIRST DAY / INTRO TO COURSE 
 
 
FRI 28 AUG  
 
DQ, preliminary matter
chap. 1 Which treats of the character and pursuits of the famous gentleman Don Quixote of La
Mancha
chap. 2 Which treats of the first sally the ingenious Don Quixote made from home
 
MON  31 AUG  
 
chap. 3 Wherein is related the droll way in which Don Quixote had himself dubbed a knight
chap. 4 Of what happened to our knight when he left the inn
chap. 5 In which the narrative of our knight's mishap is continued
 
WED 2 SEPT   
 
chap. 6 Of the diverting and important scrutiny which the curate and the barber made in the library of
our ingenious gentleman
chap. 7 Of the second sally of our worthy knight Don Quixote of La Mancha
chap. 8 Of the good fortune which the valiant Don Quixote had in the terrible and undreamt-of
adventure of The windmills, with other occurrences worthy to be fitly recorded
 
 
FRI 4 SEPT  
 
chap. 9 In which is concluded and finished the terrific battle between the gallant Biscayan and the
valiant Manchegan 
chap. 10 Of the pleasant discourse that passed between Don Quixote and his squire Sancho Panza 
chap. 11 Of what befell Don Quixote with certain goatherds
chap. 12 Of what a goatherd related to those with Don Quixote

MON 7 SEPT LABOR DAY HOLIDAY
 
WED 9 SEPT  
 
chap. 13 In which is ended the story of the shepherdess Marcela, with other incidents
chap. 14 Wherein are inserted the despairing verses of the dead shepherd, together with other incidents
not looked for 
 
FRI 11 SEPT  
 
chap. 15 In which is related the unfortunate adventure that Don Quixote fell in with when he fell out
with certain heartless Yanguesans  
chap. 16 Of what happened to the ingenious gentleman in the inn which he took to be a castle
 
MON 14 SEPT  
 
chap. 17 In which are contained the innumerable troubles which the brave Don Quixote and his good
squire Sancho Panza endured in the inn, which to his misfortune he took to be a castle   
chap. 18 In which is related the discourse Sancho Panza held with his master, Don Quixote, and other
adventures worth relating
chap. 19 Of the shrewd discourse which Sancho held with his master, and of the adventure that befell
him with a dead body, together with other notable occurrences
chap. 20 Of the unexampled and unheard-of adventure which was achieved by the valiant Don
Quixote of La Mancha with less peril than any ever achieved by any famous knight in the world
 
WED 16 SEPT  
 
chap. 21 Which treats of the exalted adventure and rich prize of Mambrino's helmet, together with
other things that happened to our invincible knight 
chap. 22 Of the freedom Don Quixote conferred on several unfortunates who against their will were
being carried where they had no wish to go 
 
FRI 18 SEPT 
 
chap. 23 Of what befell Don Quixote in the Sierra Morena, which was one of the rarest adventures
related in this veracious history   
chap. 24 In which is continued the adventure of the Sierra Morena
 
MON 21 SEPT  
 
chap. 25 Which treats of the strange things that happened to the stout knight of La Mancha in the
Sierra Morena, and of his imitation of the penance of Beltenebros
chap. 26 In which are continued the refinements wherewith Don Quixote played the part of a lover in
the Sierra Morena
chap. 27 Of how the curate and the barber proceeded with their scheme; together with other matters
worthy of record in this great history
 
WED 23 SEPT  
 
chap. 28 Which treats of the strange and delightful adventure that befell the curate and the barber in
the same Sierra
chap. 29 Which treats of the droll device and method adopted to  extricate our love-stricken knight
from the severe penance he had imposed upon himself
 
FRI 25 SEPT  QUIZ 1
 
chap. 30 Which treats of address displayed by the fair Dorothea, with other matters pleasant and
amusing
chap. 31 Of the delectable discussion between Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, his squire, together
with other incidents
 
MON 28 SEPT  
 
chap. 32 Which treats of what befell Don Quixote's party at the inn
chap. 33 In which is related the novel of "The Ill-Advised Curiosity"
chap. 34 In which is continued the novel of "The Ill-Advised Curiosity"
chap. 35 Which treats of the heroic and prodigious battle Don Quixote had with certain skins of red
wine, and brings the novel of "The Ill-Advised Curiosity" to a close 
chap. 36 Which treats of more curious incidents that occurred at the inn
 
WED 30 SEPT 
 
chap. 37 In which is continued the story of the famous Princess Micomicona, with other droll
adventures
chap. 38 Which treats of the curious discourse Don Quixote delivered on arms and letters 
chap. 39 Wherein the captive relates his life and adventures

FRI 2 OCT  3-PAGE PROSPECTUS  [electronic submissions accepted]
 
chap. 40 In which the story of the captive is continued
chap. 41 In which the captive still continues his adventures
chap. 42 Which treats of what further took place in the inn, and of several other things worth knowing
 
MON  5 OCT  
 
chap. 43 Wherein is related the pleasant story of the muleteer, together with other strange things that
came to pass in the inn
chap. 44 In which are continued the unheard-of adventures of the inn
chap. 45 In which the doubtful question of Mambrino's helmet and the pack-saddle is finally settled,
with other adventures that occurred in truth and earnest
chap. 46 Of the end of the notable adventure of the officers of the Holy Brotherhood; and of the great
ferocity of our worthy knight, Don Quixote
chap. 47 Of the strange manner in which Don Quixote of La Mancha was carried away enchanted,
together with other remarkable incidents
 
WED 7 OCT  
 
chap. 48 In which the canon pursues the subject of the books of chivalry, with other matters worthy of
his wit
chap. 49 Which treats of the shrewd conversation which Sancho Panza held with his master Don
Quixote
chap. 50 Of the shrewd controversy which Don Quixote and the canon held, together with other
incidents
 
FRI 9 OCT  REWRITE OF 3-PAGE PROSPECTUS [electronic submissions accepted]
 
chap. 51 Which deals with what the goatherd told those who were carrying off Don Quixote
chap. 52 Of the quarrel that Don Quixote had with the goatherd, together with the rare adventure of the
penitents, which with an expenditure of sweat he brought to a happy conclusion
 
MON 12 OCT  REVIEW
 
WED 14 OCT  REVIEW
 
FRI 16 OCT MID-TERM EXAM [BLUE BOOK REQUIRED]
 
 
 
MON 19 OCT  
 
Part II, preliminary matter and prologue
chap. 1 Of the interview the curate and the barber had with Don Quixote about his malady
chap. 2 Which treats of the notable altercation which Sancho Panza had with Don Quixote's niece, and
housekeeper, together with other droll matters
chap. 3 Of the laughable conversation that passed between Don Quixote, Sancho Panza, and the
bachelor Samson Carrasco
chap. 4 In which Sancho Panza gives a satisfactory reply to the  doubts and questions of the bachelor
Samson Carrasco, together with other matters worth knowing and telling
chap. 5 Of the shrewd and droll conversation that passed between Sancho Panza and his wife Teresa
Panza, and other matters worthy of  being duly recorded
 
WED 21 OCT  SUBMIT MID-TERM ESSAYS  [electronic submissions accepted]
 
chap. 6 Of what took place between Don Quixote and his niece and housekeeper; one of the most
important chapters in the whole history
chap. 7 Of what passed between Don Quixote and his squire,  together with other very notable
incidents
chap. 8 Wherein is related what befell Don Quixote on his way to see his lady Dulcinea Del Toboso
chap. 9 Wherein is related what will be seen there
 
FRI 23 OCT 5-PAGE PROSPECTUS  [electronic submissions accepted]
 
chap. 10 Wherein is related the crafty device Sancho adopted to enchant the lady Dulcinea, and other
incidents as ludicrous as they are true
chap. 11 Of the strange adventure which the valiant Don Quixote had with the car or cart of "The
Cortes of Death"
chap. 12 Of the strange adventure which befell the valiant Don Quixote with the bold knight of the
mirrors
chap. 13 In which is continued the adventure of the knight of the grove, together with the sensible,
original, and tranquil colloquy that passed between the two squires
 MON 26 OCT 
 
chap. 14 Wherein is continued the adventure of the knight of the grove
chap. 15 Wherein it is told and known who the knight of the mirrors and his squire were
chap. 16 Of what befell Don Quixote with a discreet gentleman of La Mancha
chap. 17 Wherein is shown the furthest and highest point which  the unexampled courage of Don
Quixote reached or could reach; together with the happily achieved adventure of the lions
chap. 18 Of what happened Don Quixote in the castle or house of the knight of the Green Gaban,
together with other matters out of the common
chap. 19 In which is related the adventure of the enamoured  shepherd, together with other truly droll
incidents
 
WED  28 OCT 
 
chap. 20 Wherein an account is given of the wedding of Camacho  the rich, together with the incident
of Basilio the poor
chap. 21 In which Camacho's wedding is continued, with other delightful incidents
chap. 22 Wherin is related the grand adventure of the cave of Montesinos in the heart of La Mancha,
which the valiant Don Quixote  brought to a happy termination 
chap. 23 Of the wonderful things the incomparable Don Quixote said he saw in the profound cave of
Montesinos, the impossibility and magnitude of which cause this adventure to be deemed
apocryphal 
 
FRI  30 OCT 
 
chap. 24 Wherein are related a thousand trifling matters, as trivial as they are necessary to the right
understanding of this great history
chap. 25 Wherein is set down the braying adventure, and the  droll one of the puppet-showman,
together with the memorable divinations of the divining ape
chap. 26 Wherein is continued the droll adventure of the  puppet-showman, together with other things
in truth right good
 
MON 2 NOV 
 
chap. 27 Wherein it is shown who master Pedro and his ape were, together with the mishap Don
Quixote had in the braying  adventure, which he did not conclude as he would have liked or as he
had expected


chap. 28 Of matters that Benengeli says he who reads them will know, if he reads them with attention
chap. 29 Of the famous adventure of the enchanted bark
chap. 30 Of Don Quixote's adventure with a fair huntress
chap. 31 Which treats of many and great matters
 
 
WED  4 NOV 
 
chap. 32 Of the reply Don Quixote gave his censurer, with other incidents, grave and droll
chap. 33 Of the delectable discourse which the duchess and her damsels held with Sancho Panza, well
worth reading and noting
chap. 34 Which relates how they learned the way in which they  were to disenchant the peerless
Dulcinea del Toboso, which is one of the rarest adventures in this book
chap. 35 Wherein is continued the instruction given to Don Quixote touching the disenchantment of
Dulcinea, together with other marvelous incidents
 
 
FRI 6 NOV  REWRITE OF 5-PAGE PROSPECTUS [electronic submissions accepted]
 
chap. 36 Wherein is related the strange and undreamt-of  adventure of the distressed duenna, alias the
Countess Trifaldi, together with a letter which Sancho Panza wrote to his wife, Teresa Panza
chap. 37 Wherein is continued the notable adventure of the distressed duenna
chap. 38 Wherein is told the distressed duenna's tale of her misfortunes
chap. 39 In which the Trifaldi continues her marvellous and memorable story
 
MON 9 NOV 
 
chap. 40 Of matters relating and belonging to this adventure and to this memorable history
chap. 41 Of the arrival of Clavileño and the end of this protracted adventure
chap. 42 Of the counsels which Don Quixote gave Sancho Panza  before he set out to govern the
island, together with other well-considered matters
chap. 43 Of the second set of counsels Don Quixote gave Sancho Panza
chap. 44 How Sancho Panza was conducted to his government, and  of the strange adventure that
befell Don Quixote in the castle
 WED 11 NOV 
 
chap. 45 Of how the great Sancho Panza took possession of his island, and of how he made a
beginning in governing
chap. 46 Of the terrible bell and cat fright that Don Quixote got in the course of the enamoured
Altisidora's wooing
chap. 47 Wherein is continued the account of how Sancho Panza conducted himself in his government
 
FRI 13 NOV  QUIZ 2
 
chap. 48 Of what befell Don Quixote with Dona Rodríguez, the duchess's duenna, together with other
occurrences worthy of record and eternal remembrance
chap. 49 Of what happened Sancho in making the round of his island
chap. 50 Wherein is set forth who the enchanters and executioners were who flogged the duenna and
pinched Don Quixote, and also what befell the page who carried the letter to Teresa Panza, Sancho
Panza's Wife
 
MON 16 NOV
 
chap. 51 Of the progress of Sancho's government, and other such entertaining matters
chap. 52 Wherein is related the adventure of the second  distressed or afflicted duenna, otherwise
called Dona Rodriguez
chap. 53 Of the troublous end and termination Sancho Panza's  government came to
chap. 54 Which deals with matters relating to this history and no other
 
WED 18 NOV
 
chap. 55 Of what befell Sancho on the road, and other things that cannot be surpassed
chap. 56 Of the prodigious and unparalleled battle that took place between Don Quixote of La Mancha
and the lackey Tosilos in defence of the daughter of Dona Rodríguez
chap. 57 Which treats of how Don Quixote took leave of the duke, and of what followed with the witty
and impudent Altisidora, one of the duchess's damsels
 
 
FRI 20 NOV
 
chap. 58 Which tells how adventures came crowding on Don Quixote in such numbers that they gave
one another no breathing-time

chap. 59 Wherein is related the strange thing, which may be regarded as an adventure, that happened
Don Quixote
chap. 60 Of what happened Don Quixote on his way to Barcelona 
chap. 61 Of what happened Don Quixote on entering Barcelona, together with other matters that
partake of the true rather than of the ingenious
chap. 62 Which deals with the adventure of the enchanted head, together with other trivial matters
which cannot be left untold
chap. 63 Of the mishap that befell Sancho Panza through the  visit to the galleys, and the strange
adventure of the fair Morisco
chap. 64 Treating of the adventure which gave Don Quixote more  unhappiness than all that had
hitherto befallen him
 
MON 23 NOV 
 
chap. 65 Wherein is made known who the knight of the white moon was; likewise Don Gregorio's
release, and other events
chap. 66 Which treats of what he who reads will see, or what he who has it read to him will hear
chap. 67 Of the resolution Don Quixote formed to turn shepherd and take to a life in the fields while
the year for which he had given his word was running its course; with other events truly delectable
and happy
chap. 68 Of the bristly adventure that befell Don Quixote
chap. 69 Of the strangest and most extraordinary adventure that befell Don Quixote in the whole
course of this great history
 
WED 25 NOV  FIRST DRAFT OF FINAL PAPER 
 
chap. 70 Which follows sixty-nine and deals with matters indispensable for the clear comprehension of
this history
chap. 71 Of what passed between Don Quixote and his squire Sancho on the way to their village
chap. 72 Of how Don Quixote and Sancho reached their village
chap. 73 Of the omens Don Quixote had as he entered his own village, and other incidents that
embellish and give a color to this great history
chap. 74 Of how Don Quixote fell sick, and of the will he made, and how he died
 
THU/FRI 26/27 NOV  THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY
 
 MON  30 NOV REVIEW PART I
 
WED  2 DEC  REVIEW PART II
 
FRI   4 DEC  LAST CLASS DAY
   REVIEW GENERAL THEMES
 
 
FRI 11 DEC: SUBMIT FINAL DRAFT OF TERM PAPER [hard
copy by 4:45 PM in Spanish Department Office, BEN
2.116? ELECTRONIC  SUBMISSIONS by 12 midnight]
MON 14 DEC: FINAL EXAM  9:00–12:00 noon [BLUE BOOK
REQUIRED]

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