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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Bobby Inman

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T C 357 • Perspctvs On Us Foreign Policy

43435 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 200pm-500pm SRH 3.221
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Course Number: TC 357

Title: Perspectives on U.S. Foreign Policy

Semester: Fall 2014

 

Instructor: Admiral Bobby Inman, Professor, LBJ School of Public Affairs

 

Description: This course examines the formulation and execution of U.S. foreign policy from the early days of the republic to the present. We will concentrate on how the different instruments of national power were considered in formulating foreign policy, and how they were leveraged in its execution.

In the beginning of the course, we will examine the historical underpinnings of our country’s foreign policy to deal with the expansionist period, the early desire to avoid international entanglements, hemispheric primacy in the form of the Monroe Doctrine, and the repelling of foreign influences during the Civil War and Reconstruction periods.

With eventual re-engagement with Europe at the dawn of the twentieth century, we will examine the Roosevelt and McKinley era in foreign policy, the early attempt to meld national and multinational interests in a collective security organization, and the pivotal role of FDR’s presidency in developing visions for the Cold War, containment, and the era of the United Nations.

In the second half of the course we will scrutinize how successive administrations utilized diplomacy and intelligence to serve the interlocking needs of national security and economic interests in the post-World War II era. We will pay particular attention to the contemporary foreign policy environment through consideration of contemporary case studies and address the question: “What is the appropriate role of the US in the world going forward?”

 

Texts/Readings:

Betts, R. (2004) U.S. National Security Strategy Lenses and Landmarks

Beehner, L. (2005) Perceptions of U.S. Public Policy

Conte, C. and Karr, A. (2001) An Outline of the US Economy

Keidel, A. (2007) Assessing China’s Economic Rise: Strengths, Weaknesses and Implications

Kuperman, A. (2004) Humanitarian Hazard: Revisiting Doctrines of Intervention

Sterns, M. (1996) Talking to Strangers: Improving American Diplomacy at Home and Abroad

- Additional readings to be determined and made available on Electronic Reserve

 

Assignments:

Group Research Project: 30%

Individual Research Paper: 30%

Short papers/memoranda: 10%

Attendance and meaningful participation: 10%

Mid term exam: 20%

T C 357 • Perspctvs On Us Foreign Policy

43500 • Fall 2013
Meets TH 200pm-500pm SRH 3.221
show description

This course examines US foreign policy, its formulation and execution, from the early days of the republic to the present. We will concentrate on how the different instruments of national power were considered in formulating foreign policy, and how they were leveraged in its execution.

To begin the course, we will examine the historical underpinnings of US foreign policy as it evolved through history, from the colonial period and the early desire to avoid foreign entanglements, to a position of primacy after World War II.

We will then examine the post-World War II era in detail with emphasis on the “pillars’ of foreign policy; national security, economic interests, the application of diplomacy and intelligence in pursuit of national interests, and how they became the basis for foreign policy under successive administrations.

For the majority of the course we will pay particular attention to the contemporary foreign policy environment through consideration of contemporary case studies, and address the question “what is the appropriate role of the US in the world going forward?” This course will place emphasis on individual and group research of policy interests, choices, and decision-making. 

Requirements: Students are expected to attend all class sessions. Unexcused absence may result in a letter grade reduction of the final grade. Students are responsible for all readings and for meaningful participation in class discussions. Students should also keep abreast of current events using credible sources such as the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and reputable policy journals. Several short papers, a mid-term exam, a research paper, and a final group presentation analyzing selected policy issues and recommending solutions will be completed. This class is offered for grade only.

Graded Components:

Group Research Project:                                            30%

Individual Research Paper:                                         30%

Short papers/memoranda:                                         10%

Attendance and meaningful participation:                    10%

Mid term exam:                                                         20%

 

About the Professor:

Admiral Inman graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in  1950, and from the National War College in 1972.  He became an adjunct  professor at the University of Texas at Austin in 1987.  He was  appointed as a tenured professor holding the Lyndon B. Johnson  Centennial Chair in National Policy in August 2001.  He served as  Interim Dean of the LBJ School of Public Affairs from 1 January to 31  December 2005 and again from January 2009 to March 2010.

Admiral Inman served in the U.S. Navy from November 1951 to July  1982, when he retired with the permanent rank of Admiral.  While on  active duty he served as Director of the National Security Agency and  Deputy Director of Central Intelligence.  After retirement from the  Navy, he was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the  Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC) in Austin,  Texas for four years and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer  of Westmark Systems, Inc., a privately owned electronics industry  holding company for three years.  Admiral Inman also served as Chairman  of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas from 1987 through 1990.

Admiral Inman’s primary activity since 1990 has been investing in  start-up technology companies, where he is a Managing Director of  Gefinor Ventures and Limestone Ventures.  He is a member of the Board of  Directors of several privately held companies.  He serves as a Trustee  of the American Assembly and the California Institute of Technology.  He  is an elected Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.

T C 357 • Perspctvs On Us Foreign Policy

43020 • Fall 2012
Meets TH 200pm-500pm SRH 3.221
show description

This course examines US foreign policy, its formulation and execution, from the early days of the republic to the present. We will concentrate on how the different instruments of national power were considered in formulating foreign policy, and how they were leveraged in its execution.

To begin the course, we will examine the historical underpinnings of US foreign policy as it evolved through history, from the colonial period and the early desire to avoid foreign entanglements, to a position of primacy after World War II.

We will then examine the post-World War II era in detail with emphasis on the “pillars’ of foreign policy; national security, economic interests, the application of diplomacy and intelligence in pursuit of national interests, and how they became the basis for foreign policy under successive administrations.

For the majority of the course we will pay particular attention to the contemporary foreign policy environment through consideration of contemporary case studies, and address the question “what is the appropriate role of the US in the world going forward?” This course will place emphasis on individual and group research of policy interests, choices, and decision-making. 

Requirements: Students are expected to attend all class sessions. Unexcused absence may result in a letter grade reduction of the final grade. Students are responsible for all readings and for meaningful participation in class discussions. Students should also keep abreast of current events using credible sources such as the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and reputable policy journals. Several short papers, a mid-term exam, a research paper, and a final group presentation analyzing selected policy issues and recommending solutions will be completed. This class is offered for grade only.

Graded Components:

Group Research Project:                                            30%

Individual Research Paper:                                         30%

Short papers/memoranda:                                         10%

Attendance and meaningful participation:                    10%

Mid term exam:                                                         20%

 

About the Professor:

Admiral Inman graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 1950, and from the National War College in 1972. He became an adjunct professor at the University of Texas at Austin in 1987. He was appointed as a tenured professor holding the Lyndon B. Johnson Centennial Chair in National Policy in August 2001. He served as Interim Dean of the LBJ School of Public Affairs from 1 January to 31 December 2005 and again from January 2009 to March 2010.

Admiral Inman served in the U.S. Navy from November 1951 to July 1982, when he retired with the permanent rank of Admiral. While on active duty he served as Director of the National Security Agency and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence. After retirement from the Navy, he was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC) in Austin, Texas for four years and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Westmark Systems, Inc., a privately owned electronics industry holding company for three years. Admiral Inman also served as Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas from 1987 through 1990.

Admiral Inman’s primary activity since 1990 has been investing in start-up technology companies, where he is a Managing Director of Gefinor Ventures and Limestone Ventures. He is a member of the Board of Directors of several privately held companies. He serves as a Trustee of the American Assembly and the California Institute of Technology. He is an elected Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.

 

 

T C 357 • Perspctvs On Us Foreign Policy

42900 • Fall 2011
Meets TH 200pm-500pm SRH 3.216
show description

Description:This course examines the formulation and execution of U.S. foreign policy from the early days of the republic to the present. We will concentrate on how the different instruments of national power were considered in formulating foreign policy, and how they were leveraged in its execution. In the beginning of the course, we will examine the historical underpinnings of our country’s foreign policy to deal with the expansionist period, the early desire to avoid international entanglements, hemispheric primacy in the form of the Monroe Doctrine, and the repelling of foreign influences during the Civil War and Reconstruction periods.With eventual re-engagement with Europe at the dawn of the twentieth century, we will examine the Roosevelt and McKinley era in foreign policy, the early attempt to meld national and multinational interests in a collective security organization, and the pivotal role of FDR’s presidency in developing visions for the Cold War, containment, and the era of the United Nations.In the second half of the course we will scrutinize how successive administrations utilized diplomacy and intelligence to serve the interlocking needs of national security and economic interests in the post-World War II era. We will pay particular attention to the contemporary foreign policy environment through consideration of contemporary case studies and address the question: “What is the appropriate role of the US in the world going forward?”

Texts/Readings:

Betts, R. (2004) U.S. National Security Strategy Lenses and LandmarksBeehner, L. (2005) Perceptions of U.S. Public PolicyConte, C. and Karr, A. (2001) An Outline of the US Economy Keidel, A. (2007) Assessing China’s Economic Rise: Strengths, Weaknesses and ImplicationsKuperman, A. (2004) Humanitarian Hazard: Revisiting Doctrines of InterventionSterns, M. (1996) Talking to Strangers: Improving American Diplomacy at Home and Abroad- Additional readings to be determined and made available on Electronic Reserve

Assignments:

Group Research Project:                30%

Individual Research Paper:                30%

Short papers/memoranda:                10%

Attendance and meaningful participation:        10%

Mid term exam:                    20%

About the Professor:

Admiral Bobby R. Inman, USN (Ret.), graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 1950 and from the National War College in 1972. He became an adjunct professor at the University of Texas at Austin in 1987. He was appointed as a tenured professor holding the Lyndon B. Johnson Centennial Chair in National Policy in August 2001. From January 1 through December 31, 2005, he served as Interim Dean of the LBJ School.Admiral Inman served in the U.S. Navy from November 1951 to July 1982, retiring with the permanent rank of Admiral. While on active duty he served as Director of the National Security Agency and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence. After retirement from the Navy he served for three years as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC) for three years, and then Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer of Westmark Systems, Inc for another three. Admiral Inman also served as Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas from 1987 through 1990.Admiral Inman's primary activity since 1990 has been investing in start-up technology companies, including Gefinor Ventures, for which her serves as Chairman and a Managing Partner. He is also a currently a member of the Board of Directors of Massey Energy Company and several privately held companies, a trustee of the American Assembly and the California Institute of Technology, a director of the Public Agenda Foundation, and an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.

T C 357 • Perspctvs On Us Foreign Policy

42865 • Fall 2010
Meets TH 200pm-500pm SRH 3.216
show description

Description:

This course examines the formulation and execution of U.S. foreign policy from the early days of the republic to the present. We will concentrate on how the different instruments of national power were considered in formulating foreign policy, and how they were leveraged in its execution.

In the beginning of the course, we will examine the historical underpinnings of our country’s foreign policy to deal with the expansionist period, the early desire to avoid international entanglements, hemispheric primacy in the form of the Monroe Doctrine, and the repelling of foreign influences during the Civil War and Reconstruction periods.

With eventual re-engagement with Europe at the dawn of the twentieth century, we will examine the Roosevelt and McKinley era in foreign policy, the early attempt to meld national and multinational interests in a collective security organization, and the pivotal role of FDR’s presidency in developing visions for the Cold War, containment, and the era of the United Nations.

In the second half of the course we will scrutinize how successive administrations utilized diplomacy and intelligence to serve the interlocking needs of national security and economic interests in the post-World War II era. We will pay particular attention to the contemporary foreign policy environment through consideration of contemporary case studies and address the question: “What is the appropriate role of the US in the world going forward?”

 

Text/Readings:

Betts, R. (2004) U.S. National Security Strategy Lenses and Landmarks

Beehner, L. (2005) Perceptions of U.S. Public Policy

Conte, C. and Karr, A. (2001) An Outline of the US Economy

Keidel, A. (2007) Assessing China’s Economic Rise: Strengths, Weaknesses and Implications

Kuperman, A. (2004) Humanitarian Hazard: Revisiting Doctrines of Intervention

Sterns, M. (1996) Talking to Strangers: Improving American Diplomacy at Home and Abroad

- Additional readings to be determined and made available on Electronic Reserve

 

Requirements:

Group Research Project:                                                30%

Individual Research Paper:                                                30%

Short papers/memoranda:                                                10%

Attendance and meaningful participation:                        10%

Mid term exam:                                                            20%

 

About the Professor

Admiral Bobby R. Inman, USN (Ret.), graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 1950 and from the National War College in 1972. He became an adjunct professor at the University of Texas at Austin in 1987. He was appointed as a tenured professor holding the Lyndon B. Johnson Centennial Chair in National Policy in August 2001. From January 1 through December 31, 2005, he served as Interim Dean of the LBJ School.

Admiral Inman served in the U.S. Navy from November 1951 to July 1982, retiring with the permanent rank of Admiral. While on active duty he served as Director of the National Security Agency and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence. After retirement from the Navy he served for three years as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC) for three years, and then Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer of Westmark Systems, Inc for another three. Admiral Inman also served as Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas from 1987 through 1990.

Admiral Inman's primary activity since 1990 has been investing in start-up technology companies, including Gefinor Ventures, for which her serves as Chairman and a Managing Partner. He is also a currently a member of the Board of Directors of Massey Energy Company and several privately held companies, a trustee of the American Assembly and the California Institute of Technology, a director of the Public Agenda Foundation, and an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.

 

T C 357 • Perspctvs On Us Foreign Policy

43805 • Fall 2009
Meets TH 200pm-500pm SRH 3.314
show description

Perspectives on US Foreign Policy
 Plan II, Fall 2009
Syllabus


Course No: TC 357                Professor Bob Inman
Unique No: 43805                SRH 3.    384BA       
Class Meets: Thursday, 2-5 p.m.        Office Hours: By appointment
Room: SRH 3.314                Sr. Admin. Associate: Tom King
Research Associate: Dougald MacMillan    tomking@austin.utexas.edu
dmacmillan@mail.utexas.edu            SRH 3.384B, 475-8668
SRH 3.384JA, 232-5187

Scope: This course examines US foreign policy, its formulation and execution, from the early days of the republic to the present. We will concentrate on how the different instruments of national power were considered in formulating foreign policy, and how they were leveraged in its execution.
To begin the course, we will examine the historical underpinnings of US foreign policy as it evolved through history, from the colonial period and the early desire to avoid foreign entanglements, to a position of primacy after World War II.
We will then examine the post-World War II era in detail with emphasis on the “pillars’ of foreign policy; national security, economic interests, the application of diplomacy and intelligence in pursuit of national interests, and how they became the basis for foreign policy under successive administrations.
In the first year of a new administration, we will pay particular attention to the contemporary foreign policy environment through consideration of contemporary case studies, and address the question “what is the appropriate role of the US in the world going forward?” This course will place emphasis on individual and group research of policy interests, choices, and decision-making. 

Requirements: Students are expected to attend all class sessions. Unexcused absence may result in a letter grade reduction of the final grade. Students are responsible for all readings and for meaningful participation in class discussions. Students should also keep abreast of current events using credible sources such as the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and reputable policy journals. Several short papers, a mid-term exam, and a final group presentation analyzing selected policy issues and recommending solutions will be completed. This class is offered for grade only.

Grading:
Group Research Project – 30 %
Individual Research Paper – 30%
Short papers – 10%
Attendance and meaningful participation – 10%
Mid term exam – 20%



Course Readings: Readings for the course are drawn from multiple sources and will be posted in electronic form in the Electronic Reserves function of the library system. There is no textbook for this course.

Teaching Assistant for this course is Andrew Solomon, a.solomon@mail.utexas.edu, (903) 285-1817 (cell).



Course Schedule

Aug 27: Course Introduction/ Historical Evolution of US Foreign Policy from Colonial Period to Civil War

    During the first two sessions we will consider the historical development of US foreign policy from the colonial period through the immediate aftermath of World War II. We will consider the interplay between elements of the national experience, the shaping of views toward the rest of the world, and evolving perceptions of the US role in it.

Readings: “Timeline of US Diplomatic History, 1750 – 1865”, US Department of State (also available at http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/)   

Sep 3: Historical Evolution of US Foreign Policy from Civil War to 1947

Readings: “Timeline of US Diplomatic History, 1866 - 1952”, US Department of State (also available at http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/)     
   
Presentation groups assigned.

1st writing requirement assigned.
   
Sep 10:  Pillars of Foreign Policy – Diplomacy
   
The first of three “pillars of foreign policy” to be considered will be that of diplomacy. The US has been criticized for its lack of effective diplomacy, even a lack of effort, in the wake of the invasion of Iraq. How has the US sought to advance its national interests through diplomacy? How will the US exercise “soft power” within the emerging international order? 

Readings:    
US Department of State, “Diplomacy: The US Department of State at Work”, June 2008.

Cynthia P. Schneider, “American Public Diplomacy after the Bush Presidency”, The Brookings Institution, April 2009.

Madeline Albright, et. al., “U.S. Needs More Foreign Diplomats”, Capitol News Company, LLC, June 25, 2009.

        1st writing requirement due.       
           
Sep 17:  Pillars of Foreign Policy – National Security

How does the US pursue its national security interests? How does it, or should it, interact with other nations? What is the contemporary national security posture, and how does the US pursue national security through bilateral and multilateral agreements?

Readings: 
    Henry Kissinger, “The Three Revolutions”, The Washington Post, April 7, 2008.

Anne-Marie Slaughter, et al, “Strategic Leadership: Framework for a 21st Century National Security Strategy”, Center for a New American Security, June 2008.

Andrew F, Krepinevich Jr., “The Pentagon’s Wasting Assets: the Eroding Foundations of American Power”, Foreign Affairs, July-August 2009.

Sep 24:  Pillars of Foreign Policy – Economic Engagement

In the wake of World War II the US faced the task of converting form a wartime to peacetime economy, and reached out with the Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe. What are the foreign policy implications of an economy that continues to become more globalized as time goes on?  How do we leverage economic activity toward foreign policy goals?

Readings:     Christopher Conte, Albert R. Karr, “An Outline of the US Economy”, Chapter 10, US Department of State, 2001.

    Ian F. Ferguson, “The World Trade Organization: Background and Issues”, Congressional Research Service, May 9, 2007.

    Colin I. Bradford Jr., “The Future of the IMF”, The Brookings Institution, April 9, 2008.

    Andrew Hansen, “The World Bank and International Development Lenders”, Council on Foreign Relations, June 1, 2007.

Lee H. Teslik, “Primer: The Financial Stability Plan”, Council on Foreign Relations, March 29, 2009.

    Lawrence H. White, “How Did We Get into This Financial Mess?”, Briefing paper, Cato Institute, November 18, 2008.

Roger C. Altman, “Globalization in Retreat: Further Geopolitical Consequences of the Financial Crisis”, Foreign Affairs, July-August 2009.
   
            Group presentation proposals due.   
     
Oct 1:  Relations with China
   
China poses perhaps the most consequential foreign policy challenge of the new millennium. Adversary? Competitor? Ally? With a burgeoning capitalist economy under a communist government, how should the US approach China?   

Readings:     US-China Relations, Fact Sheet, Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, Washington, DC, April 18, 2006
Jayshree Bajoria, “The China – North Korea Relationship”, Backgrounder, Council on Foreign Relations, June 18, 2008.

Michael Roberge, Youkyung Lee, “China-Taiwan Relations”, Backgrounder, Council on Foreign Relations, August 11, 2009.

Elizabeth Economy, Adam Segal, “The G2 Mirage: Why the United States and China are Not Ready to Upgrade Ties”, Foreign Affairs, May-June 2009.

Hillary R, Clinton, Timothy Geitner, “”A New Strategic and Economic Dialog with China”, op-ed, The Wall Street Journal, July 27, 2009.

Oct 8:  US Relations with Russia

Readings:      Council on Foreign Relations, “Russia’s Wrong Direction: What the United States Can and Should Do”, Independent Task Force Report #57, March 2006, pp. 3-28, scan remainder.

James M. Goldgeier, “A Realistic Reset with Russia”, Hoover Institution, Policy Review August/September 2009.

2nd writing requirement assigned.




Oct 15:  US Engagement in the Middle East

The US initiated Global War on Terror has spawned a new era of engagement in the Middle East, with significant reverberations worldwide and public opinion of the US in the region at an all time low. Given the foreign policy imperatives of healthy relations in the region (oil being only one among several), how does the US go about improving its foreign policy stance in the region?

Readings: 
    Marina Ottoway, et al, “The New Middle East”, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, February 2008.


LTG Keith Dayton, “Security Coordination: Israel and the Palestinian Authority”, keynote address, The Washington Institute for Near East Policy, May 7, 2009.

Fotini Christia, Michael Semple, “Flipping the Taliban: How to Win in Afghanistan”, Foreign Affairs, July-August 2009.

2nd writing assignment due.

Oct 22:  Mid Term Exam

Oct 29:  US and Latin American Relations

Readings:     Shannon Oneal, et al, “US-Latin American Relations: A new Direction for a New Reality”, Independent Task Force, Council on Foreign Relations, 2008, pages 5-74.

Roger F. Noriega, “Heading Off Another “Lost Decade” in Latin America”, America Enterprise Institute, March 2009.

Stephen Haber, “Latin America’s Quiet Revolution”, Wall Street Journal, January 30, 2009.

    The Economist, “The Dragon in the Backyard”, August 13, 2009.


Nov 5:  The US and Multilateral Organizations

The aftermath of World War II saw the growth of a number of multinational organizations to ensure international cooperation on various issues and prevent a repeat of escalation to world war. What is their track record? Are they relevant to today’s challenges?

Readings:    Report of the Task Force on the United Nations, “The Imperative for Action”, United States Institute of Peace, December, 2005.

Daniel Hamilton, et al, “Alliance Reborn: An Atlantic Compact for the 21st Century, The Washington NATO Project, Atlantic Council of the United States, February 2009, Chapters 2-4, scan remainder.

William J. Perry, Brent Scowcroft, et al, “US Nuclear Weapons Policy”, Independent Task Force Report No. 62, Council on Foreign Relations, April 2009, pages 3-28, 46 – 60.

Toni Johnson, “The World Health Organization”, Backgrounder, Council on Foreign Relations, August 10, 2009.

Nov 12: Toward a New Foreign Policy

In this session we will culminate our look at foreign policy by addressing the question “where do we go from here?” How do we reinvigorate relations throughout the world, and what kinds of interaction offer the most potential for the US to maintain a position of primacy and leadership?

Readings:     Working Group Report, “America’s Role in the World: Foreign Policy Choices for the Next President”, Institute for the Study of Diplomacy, Georgetown University, 2008, Introduction (pp.1-8), scan remainder.

Fareed Zakaria, “Wanted: A New Grand Strategy”, Newsweek, December 8, 2008.

Research papers due.   

Nov 19:  Group Presentations

Nov 26:  No Class - Thanksgiving
 
Dec 3: Diplomacy and the Foreign Service (TENT)

    How does diplomacy really work from a practical standpoint? Ambassador Engle will lend his perspective on the art and science of diplomacy, with observations on where we are now, and how we need to alter the diplomatic dialog.

Readings: TBA      


Group Presentation Instructions will be provided separately.

Individual Research Paper Instructions: Improving your research capability is a primary learning objective for this course.  Choose a foreign policy issue that you are interested in and write a research paper examining the issue, stating your conclusions and any recommendations you have for its resolution. Papers must be no less than 15 pages and no more than 18, using Times New Roman font, 12 point. You should use and cite no fewer than five outside sources (other than the course materials).To assist you in the early development of your topic and writing plan, submit a proposal for your paper on September 20. The RA and TA will review your proposal with you to make sure you get a good start, and to prevent unnecessary duplication.

Short writings:  These will be assigned and are due on the dates indicated in the schedule. Separate instructions will be given for each requirement.

Electronic reserves: With the exception of the texts, all of your course readings will be found on the UT Library Electronic Reserves System (ERes). To access the files follow these steps:

1. From the UT Austin Home Page go to Libraries and Museums – University Libraries.
2. Select “Access Electronic Reserves”.
3. Select “Student access…”.
4. Find the course using course number or instructor name.
5. Enter the course page password - bidm.
6. Select the folder corresponding to the lesson and click on it.
7. Enter the document password - bidm. The folder will expand to show the individual documents.
8. Use ERes links and help selections as necessary.

A word of caution: ERes provides blanket copyright protection of course materials used under the fair use doctrine because of the password protection feature. Please protect the passwords and do not make them available to others outside of class.

Academic Integrity: Students are expected to respect the LBJ School's standards regarding academic dishonesty. You owe it to yourself, your fellow students, and the institution to maintain the highest standards of integrity and ethical behavior. A discussion of academic integrity, including definitions of plagiarism and unauthorized collaboration, as well as helpful information on citations, note taking, and paraphrasing, can be found at the Office of the Dean of Students web page. (http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acint_student.php) and the Office of Graduate Studies (http://www.utexas.edu/ogs/ethics/transcripts/academic.html). The University has also established disciplinary procedures and penalty guidelines for academic dishonesty, especially Sec. 11.304 in Appendix C of the Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities section in UT's General Information Catalog. 

Students with Disabilities: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic adjustments for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, please visit the Services for Students with Disabilities website at:  http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/.

































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