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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Julia Mickenberg

Associate Professor Ph. D.

Julia Mickenberg

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Biography

Julia Mickenberg is the author of Learning from the Left: Children's Literature, The Cold War, and Radical Politics in the United States (2006), which won the Grace Abbott Book Prize from the Society for the History of Children and Youth, the Children's Literature Association's Book Award, the Pacific Coast Branch Award from the American Historical Association, a UT Cooperative Hamilton Book Award runner up prize. She is also co-editor of Tales for Little Rebels: A Collection of Radical Children's Literature (2008) and The Oxford Handbook of Children's Literature (2011), which won the Children's Literature Association's 2011 Edited Book Award. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and her A.B. from Brown University.

Research Interests

Professor Mickenberg's current book project, for which she was awarded a Humanities Research Award from UT and an NEH fellowship, is tentatively entitled "The New Woman Tries on Red: Russia in the American Feminist Imagination, 1905-1945."

Courses Taught

Main Currents in American Culture, 1865-present; U.S. Cultural History; Society, Culture, and Politics in the 1960s; Women Radicals and Reformers; Children's Literature and American Culture; The Culture of the Cold War; Modernism, Feminism, and Radicalism; Cultures of U.S. Radicalism; The Cold War and American Childhood; Childhood Studies; Practicum in Teaching American Studies; and College and Controversy

 

Interests

History of the Left/Radical Cultures, Children's Literature, Women's History, History of Childhood, Russian Studies, Americans abroad, utopia

T C 302 • College And Controversy

43360 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 436B
show description

T C 302 • College And Controversy

Julia Mickenberg

College and Controversy: The Histories, Purposes and Cultures of American Universities

 

Description:

This course is designed to give incoming students the opportunity to reflect upon colleges and universities as institutions, imagined places, and sites of controversy in American culture. We will discuss the history and purposes of the university; fictional depictions of college life in literature and film; debates surrounding such topics as fraternities, sports and alcohol; the relationship between struggles for social justice and university curricula; and the tensions between ideals of disinterested learning and the pressures of the marketplace. Finally, we’ll study the ways in which larger issues in higher education have played out, and continue to play out, at the University of Texas.

 

Probable Texts:

 Andrew Delbanco, College: What it is, Was, and Should Be

 Zadie Smith, On Beauty

 Charles Clotfelter, Big-Time Sports in American Universities

 Professor X, In the Basement of the Ivory Tower: The Truth About College

 Additional readings on-line or in packet

 

Films:

 The Freshman

 Animal House

 Berkeley in the Sixties

 When I Rise

 

Requirements:

 Paper 1: The purpose of college/goals for college (initial assignment + end-of-semester revision)—20%

 Paper 2: Discussion of fictional representations of College—20%

 Paper 3: Ethnography and critical discussion assignment 20%

 Paper 4: Final group research project (includes written work, collaboration, and presentation)—25%

 Participation: Includes quizzes, online and in-class discussion: 15%

 

About the Professor:

Julia Mickenberg has been teaching in UT’s Department of American Studies since 2001. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and an A.B. from Brown University. She’s written or edited several prize-winning books dealing with children’s literature and cultural politics, and is currently writing a book about Russia in the American feminist imagination from 1905-1945. Her research has been supported by numerous grants and fellowships, including awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Spencer Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution. For fun, in addition to reading novels and watching movies about college, she does yoga, runs, and goes on adventures with her husband, two daughters, and their frisky yellow lab, Stanley.

 

T C 302 • College And Controversy

43400 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CRD 007A
show description

College and Controversy: The Histories, Purposes and Cultures of American Universities

Description:

This course is designed to give incoming students the opportunity to reflect upon colleges and universities as institutions, imagined places, and sites of controversy in American culture. We will discuss the history and purposes of the university; fictional depictions of college life in literature and film; debates surrounding such topics as fraternities, sports and alcohol; the relationship between struggles for social justice and university curricula; and the tensions between ideals of disinterested learning and the pressures of the marketplace. Finally, we’ll study the ways in which larger issues in higher education have played out, and continue to play out, at the University of Texas.

Texts:

Delbanco, College: What it is, Was, and Should Be

Zadie Smith, On Beauty

Murray Sperber, Beer and Circus: How Big-Time College Sports is Crippling Undergraduate Education

Christopher Newfield, Unmaking the Public University: The Forty Year Assault on the Middle Class

Additional readings on-line or in packet

Films:

The Freshman

Animal House

Berkeley in the Sixties

When I Rise

Requirements:

Paper 1: The purpose of college/goals for college—20%

Paper 2: Discussion of fictional representations of College—20%

Paper 3: Ethnography and critical discussion assignment 20%

Paper 4: Final group research project (includes written work, collaboration, and presentation)—25%

Participation: Includes quizzes, online and in-class discussion: 15%

About the Professor:

Julia Mickenberg has been teaching in UT’s Department of American Studies since 2001. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and an A.B. from Brown University. She’s written or edited several prize-winning books dealing with children’s literature and cultural politics, and is currently writing a book about Russia in the American feminist imagination from 1905-1945. Her research has been supported by numerous grants and fellowships, including awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Spencer Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution. For fun, in addition to reading novels and watching movies about college, she does yoga, runs, and goes on adventures with her husband, two daughters, and their frisky yellow lab, Stanley.

Publications

Books

Leaning from the Left: Children's Literature, the Cold War, and Radical Politics in the United States (Oxford U.P., 2006). Winner of the Children's Literature Association Book Prize, the Grace Abbott Prize from teh Society for the HIstory of Childhood and Youth, the Pacific Coast Branch Prize from the American Historical Association's Pacific Coast Branch, and a $3,000 Hamilton Book Award.

Tales for Little Rebels: A Collection of Radical Children's Literature, edited with Philip Nel (New York U.P., 2008). Selected amonth the "best of the best" books for school and public libraries by the American Association of University Publishers.

The Oxford Handbook of Children's Literature. Edited with Lynne Vallone. (Oxford U.P., 2011).

Peer-Reviewed Articles

“Radical Children’s Literature Now!” (co-authored with Philip Nel). Children’s Literature Association Quarterly, forthcoming, fall 2011.

“The New Generation and the New Russia: Modern Childhood as Collective Fantasy.” American Quarterly 62:1 (March 2010): 103-134.

“Nursing Radicalism: Some Lessons from a Postwar Girls’ Series.” American Literary History 19:2 (summer 2007), 491-520.

“Of Funnybones, Steam Shovels, and Railroads to Freedom: Juvenile Publishing, Progressive Education, and the Politicization of Childhood, 1919-1935,” Children’s Literature Association Quarterly 28:3 (Fall 2003), 144-57.

“Civil Rights, History and the Left: Inventing the Juvenile Black Biography.” MELUS (Multi Ethnic Literature of the United States) 27:2 (Summer 2002), 65-93.

“Communist in a Coonskin Cap? Meridel Le Sueur’s Books for Children and the Reformulation of America’s Cold War Frontier Narrative.” The Lion and the Unicorn 21 (1997), 59-85.

“Left at Home in Iowa: ‘Progressive Regionalists’ and the WPA Guide to 1930s Iowa.” Annals of Iowa 56 (Summer 1997) 233-56. *Honorable Mention, Throne-Aldrich Award for best Annals article of 1997.

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