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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Joan Neuberger

Professor Ph.D., 1985, Stanford University

Joan Neuberger

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Biography

Professor Neuberger studies modern Russian culture in social and political context, with a focus on the politics of the  arts. She is the author of an eclectic range of publications, including Hooliganism: Crime and Culture in St Petersburg, 1900-1914 (California: 1993), Ivan the Terrible: The Film Companion (Palgrave: 2003); co-author of Europe and the Making of Modernity, 1815-1914 (Oxford: 2005); and co-editor of Imitations of Life: Melodrama in Russia (Duke: 2001) and Picturing Russia: Explorations in Visual Culture (Yale: 2008).

Interests

Her teaching interests include modern Russia, nineteenth-century Europe, film, and visual culture.

T C 357 • Visual Cultures In Russn Hist

43140 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CRD 007B
show description

Description:

This course will introduce students to Russian history through its visual culture. It will also introduce visual culture through Russian history.

By comparing a variety of visual and verbal sources, we will analyze the ways in which different kinds of sources shape our views of history and our views of the world around us. We will read widely in Russian visual culture and contemporary visual theory and each student will write a research paper on a topic of his or her own choice.

The goals of this course include:

  • Improving students’ ability to read visual documents analytically
  • Improving students’ ability to write coherent, persuasive essays
  • Gaining an appreciation for Russian history and culture
  • Thinking about the role of visual culture in history, politics, public ethics, and everyday life

Texts/Readings:

Valerie Kivelson and Joan Neuberger, eds Picturing Russia: Explorations in Visual Culture

Richard Howells and Joaquim Negreiros, Visual Culture

Roger Bartlett, A History of Russia

Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History

Other chapters and articles posted on Blackboard as pdfs

 

Assignments:

Participation in discussion (10%)

Regular 1-page (300 word) essays on the reading (20%)

Research Project:

Prospectus (5%)

Source review (5%)

1000-word excerpt-draft (10%)

Peer-review (10%)

Oral presentation (10%)

15-page (4500 word) completed paper (30%)

 

About the Professor:

Professor Neuberger studies modern Russian culture in social and political context, with a focus on the politics of the  arts. She is the author of an eclectic range of publications, including Hooliganism: Crime and Culture in St Petersburg, 1900-1914 (California: 1993), Ivan the Terrible: The Film Companion (Palgrave: 2003); co-author of Europe and the Making of Modernity, 1815-1914 (Oxford: 2005); and co-editor of Imitations of Life: Melodrama in Russia (Duke: 2001) and Picturing Russia: Explorations in Visual Culture (Yale: 2008). Her teaching interests include modern Russia, nineteenth-century Europe, film, and visual culture.

 

T C 357 • Visual Culs In Russian History

43485 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CRD 007B
show description

This course will introduce students to Russian history through its visual culture.

We will explore the political uses of art and the contributions of art to politics in four case studies: medieval Orthodox icons, eighteenth-century palace architecture, modern realistic painting, and twentieth-century film and photography (see below for more detail). By comparing a variety of visual and verbal sources, we also will analyze the ways in which different kinds of sources shape our views of history and our views of the world around us. We will read widely in Russian visual culture and each student will write a research paper on a topic of their own choice.

 

The goals of this course include:

  • Improving students’ ability to read visual documents analytically
  • Improving students’ ability to write coherent, persuasive essays
  • Gaining an appreciation for Russian history and culture
  • Thinking about the role of visual culture in history, politics, public ethics, and everyday life

 

Requirements and Grading

Participation in discussion (10%)

Bi-weekly 1-page (300 word) essays on the reading (20%)

Research Project:

Prospectus (5%)

750-word excerpt-draft(15%)

Peer-review (10%)

Oral presentation (10%)

15-page (4500 word) completed paper (30%)

 

Reading Assignments:

W Bruce Lincoln, Between Heaven and Hell: 1000 Years of Russian Culture

Valerie Kivelson and Joan Neuberger, eds, Picturing Russia: Explorations in Visual Culture

Robin Cormack, Icons

George Munro, The Most Intentional City: St Petersburg in the Reign of Catherine the Great

The Memoirs of Princess Dashkova

David Jackson, The Wanderers and Critical Realism in Nineteenth-Century Russian Art

Peter Brooks, Realist Vision

Christina Kiaer, Imagine No Possessions: Socialist Objects of Russian Constructivism

Lilya Kaganovsky, How the Soviet Man was (Un)Made

Oksana Bulgakowa, Eisenstein: A Biography
plus

Excerpts from selected memoirs, plays, manifestos, state decrees on the following topics

 

CASE STUDIES

1. Icons, Frescos and Apocalypse, 1480s-1580s

In this segment of the course we will study the cooperation of church and state in promoting public and private codes of conduct. We will study the gradual centralization of state efforts to direct icon painting, and as a case study--the production and uses of Orthodox icons and frescos of the Last Judgment during the reign of Ivan the Terrible.

 

2. Catherine the Great and St Petersburg, 1770-80s

In this segment of the course we will study the Empress’s efforts to “westernize,” “civilize,” “enlighten” Russians though written and visual arts: her commission of plays and palaces, purchase of art, and building of museums.

We will read the memoirs of Catherine’s friend, the Princess Dashkova, and the play, Woe from a Carriage, to study the successes and limitations of the campaign. (Woe is a satire about two serf owners so obsessed with French culture that they break up a serf family -- selling them for the money to buy the latest French carriage)

 

3. Russian Realist Painting, 1870s-1880s

In this segment we will study the rise of a generation of artists who saw themselves as the “conscience of society” and sought to use “Realism” in paintings for social and political critique. We will also examine those artists who resisted being categorized as “political.”

We will read fiery political manifestos of the painters’ contemporaries and compare them with the works of the painters known as the Wanderers, including Ilya Repin and Izaak Levitan, whose works were both controversial and popular.

 

4. Soviet Socialist Realism in the Visual Arts,

In this segment of the course we will study the ways in which Soviet visual artists (primarily in photography and film) implemented the policy known as socialist realism.

 

Dr. Neuberger studies modern Russian culture in social and political context. Her teaching interests include modern Russia, nineteenth-century Europe, gender, film and visual culture. She is the author of "Hooliganism: Crime, Culture and Power in St. Petersburg, 1900-1914" (1993); and "Ivan the Terrible: The Film Companion" (2003). She co-authored "Europe and the Making of Modernity, 1815-1914" (2005); co-edited Imitations of "Life: Two Centuries of Melodrama in Russia" (2001) and produced the special-feature documentary, "The Politics and History of Ivan" for the Criterion Collection DVD, "Eisenstein: The Sound Years."

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