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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

William Roger Louis

Professor D.Phil., 1962, and D.Litt., 1979, Oxford University

William Roger Louis

Contact

Biography

Courses taught:
His teaching fields are the British Empire/Commonwealth and the history, literature, and politics of nineteenth and twentieth-century Britain.

Geographic Area(s) of Study: Middle East, Europe: Modern, South Asia

Thematic Field(s): Empire and Globalization 

Recent Publications: 
Professor Louis has recently published Ends of British Imperialism: the Scramble for Empire, Suez, and Decolonization (2006). He has written or edited more than thirty books including Imperialism at Bay (1977) and The British Empire in the Middle East (1984). His edited publications include The End of the Palestine Mandate (1986), The Transfers of Power in Africa(1988), Suez 1956 (1989), The Iraqi Revolution (1991), and Churchill (1993). 

Interests

History of the British Empire and Commonwealth, the Middle East, India, and end of empires

T C 325 • British Hist, Lit, And Polits

43395 • Fall 2014
Meets F 300pm-400pm HRC 3.204
(also listed as HIS 366N, LAH 350 )
show description

This seminar is designed as a reading course in history, literature, and politics, and as a class in professional writing. Its scope will include not only the literature, history, and politics of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, but also the interaction of British and other societies throughout the world. One point of emphasis will be the history of the British Empire and Commonwealth in its Asian and African as well as early American dimensions. Another point will be a focus on historical, literary, and auto-biography (Disreali, Woolf, Lawrence, Orwell, Gandhi, etc.).

In a general way, the seminar upholds the principles of the Modern History Faculty at Oxford-to enhance (1) intellectual curiosity, (2) conceptual clarity; (3) flexibility, that is, the capacity to engage with alternative perspectives and new information; (4) accuracy and attention to detail; (5) critical engagement; (6) capacity for hard work (7) enthusiasm for history, literature, and politics; and (8) historical imagination and understanding, that is the ability to speculate and compare, alongside the possession of appropriate historical knowledge and the capacity to deploy it.

Texts:

Lytton Strachey's Eminent Victorians is required, then a choice of five other books from the list below plus six others to be decided upon in consultation with the instructor:

Robert Blake, Disraeli

Michael Holroyd, Lytton Strachey

Hermione Lee, Virginia Woolf

T. E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom

Bernard Crick, George Orwell: A Life

Judith M. Brown, Gandhi: Prisoner of Hope

T C 325 • British Hist, Lit, And Polits

43445 • Fall 2013
Meets F 300pm-400pm HRC 3.204
(also listed as HIS 366N, LAH 350 )
show description

This seminar is designed as a reading course in history, literature, and politics, and as a class in professional writing. Its scope will include not only the literature, history, and politics of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, but also the interaction of British and other societies throughout the world. One point of emphasis will be the history of the British Empire and Commonwealth in its Asian and African as well as early American dimensions. Another point will be a focus on historical, literary, and auto-biography (Disreali, Woolf, Lawrence, Orwell, Gandhi, etc.).

 

In a general way, the seminar upholds the principles of the Modern History Faculty at Oxford-to enhance (1) intellectual curiosity, (2) conceptual clarity; (3) flexibility, that is, the capacity to engage with alternative perspectives and new information; (4) accuracy and attention to detail; (5) critical engagement; (6) capacity for hard work (7) enthusiasm for history, literature, and politics; and (8) historical imagination and understanding, that is the ability to speculate and compare, alongside the possession of appropriate historical knowledge and the capacity to deploy it.

 

Texts:

Lytton Strachey's Eminent Victorians is required, then a choice of five other books from the list below plus six others to be decided upon in consultation with the instructor:

 

      Robert Blake, Disraeli

 

      Michael Holroyd, Lytton Strachey

 

      Hermione Lee, Virginia Woolf

 

      T. E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom

 

      Bernard Crick, George Orwell: A Life

 

      Judith M. Brown, Gandhi: Prisoner of Hope

T C 325 • British Hist, Lit, And Polit

42985 • Fall 2012
Meets F 300pm-400pm HRC 3.204
(also listed as HIS 366N, LAH 350 )
show description

This seminar is designed as a reading course in history, literature, and politics, and as a class in professional writing. Its scope will include not only the literature, history, and politics of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, but also the interaction of British and other societies throughout the world. One point of emphasis will be the history of the British Empire and Commonwealth in its Asian and African as well as early American dimensions. Another point will be a focus on historical, literary, and auto-biography (Disreali, Woolf, Lawrence, Orwell, Gandhi, etc.).

In a general way, the seminar upholds the principles of the Modern History Faculty at Oxford-to enhance (1) intellectual curiosity, (2) conceptual clarity; (3) flexibility, that is, the capacity to engage with alternative perspectives and new information; (4) accuracy and attention to detail; (5) critical engagement; (6) capacity for hard work (7) enthusiasm for history, literature, and politics; and (8) historical imagination and understanding, that is the ability to speculate and compare, alongside the possession of appropriate historical knowledge and the capacity to deploy it.

Texts

Lytton Strachey's Eminent Victorians is required, then a choice of five other books from the list below plus six others to be decided upon in consultation with the instructor:

      Robert Blake, Disraeli

      Michael Holroyd, Lytton Strachey 

      Hermione Lee, Virginia Woolf

      T. E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom

      Bernard Crick, George Orwell: A Life

      Judith M. Brown, Gandhi: Prisoner of Hope

About the Professor:

His teaching fields are the British Empire and Commonwealth and the comparative history of colonialism, Belgian, French, Dutch, German, and Portuguese; and the history, literature, and politics of nineteenth and twentieth-century Britain.

Professor Louis has recently published Ends of British Imperialism: the Scramble for Empire, Suez, and Decolonization (2006). He has written or edited more than thirty books including Imperialism at Bay (1977) and The British Empire in the Middle East (1984). His edited publications include The End of the Palestine Mandate (1986), The Transfers of Power in Africa (1988), Suez 1956 (1989), The Iraqi Revolution (1991), and Churchill (1993).

He is the past President of the American Historical Association and the present Director of the AHA's National History Center.  He is Editor-in-Chief of The Oxford History of the British Empire, and the former Chairman of the Historical Advisory Committee, U.S. Department of State (resigned on principle, 2008).

Awards/Honors

Selected by the 50,000 students at UT as Professor of the Year, 2009

Kluge Chair for the Library of Congress in 2010

Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2011

T C 325 • Tpcs In The Arts & Scis-Honors

42860 • Fall 2011
Meets F 300pm-400pm HRC 3.204
(also listed as HIS 366N, LAH 350 )
show description

 British History, Literature, and Politics

This seminar is designed as a reading course in history, literature, and politics, and as a class in professional writing.  In addition to the required reading listed below, each student draws up an individual reading list in consultation with the professor.The scope of the seminar includes not only the literature, history, and politics of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, but also the interaction of British and other societies throughout the world. One point of emphasis will be the history of the British Empire and Commonwealth in its Asian and African as well as early American dimensions. Another point will be a focus on historical and literary biography—and auto-biography—for example, not only Disreali, Virginia Woolf, T. E. Lawrence, and George Orwell, but also Gandhi.The seminar upholds the principles of the Modern History Faculty at Oxford—to enhance (1) intellectual curiosity; (2) conceptual clarity; (3) flexibility, that is, the capacity to engage with alternative perspectives and new information; (4) accuracy and attention to detail; (5) critical engagement; (6) capacity for hard work (7) enthusiasm for history, literature, and politics; and (8) historical imagination and understanding, that is the ability to speculate and compare, alongside the possession of appropriate historical knowledge and the capacity to deploy it.

Readings:The following books are required – plus ther books (one a week) to be decided upon in consultation with the instructor:Lytton Strachey, Eminent Victorians Hermione Lee, Virginia WoolfNorman Davies, The Isles

Requirements:The main requirements of the course are met by students reading a book or its equivalent each week and by submitting a weekly critique of the reading. Each of the weekly essays is circulated to all other members of the class who make annotated comments on style as well as substance. Revision is required. The class thus becomes as much a course in professional writing as one in which individual academic interests are pursued.Additionally, the class also meets together with the British Studies faculty seminar at three o'clock Friday afternoons. Attendance is mandatory.

About the Professor:Professor Roger Louis teaches in Oxford as well as the UT Department of History. He is the author or editor of some twenty books including Imperialism at Bay and a biographical study of Churchill. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Oxford History of the British Empire.

T C 325 • Tpcs In The Arts And Sciences

42810 • Fall 2010
Meets F 300pm-400pm HRC 3.204
(also listed as HIS 366N, LAH 350 )
show description

Description:

This seminar is designed as a reading course in history, literature, and politics, and as a class in professional writing.  In addition to the required reading listed below, each student draws up an individual reading list in consultation with the professor.

The scope of the seminar includes not only the literature, history, and politics of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, but also the interaction of British and other societies throughout the world. One point of emphasis will be the history of the British Empire and Commonwealth in its Asian and African as well as early American dimensions.

Another point will be a focus on historical and literary biography—and auto-biography—for example, not only Disreali, Virginia Woolf, T. E. Lawrence, and George Orwell, but also Gandhi.

The seminar upholds the principles of the Modern History Faculty at Oxford—to enhance (1) intellectual curiosity; (2) conceptual clarity; (3) flexibility, that is, the capacity to engage with alternative perspectives and new information; (4) accuracy and attention to detail; (5) critical engagement; (6) capacity for hard work (7) enthusiasm for history, literature, and politics; and (8) historical imagination and understanding, that is the ability to speculate and compare, alongside the possession of appropriate historical knowledge and the capacity to deploy it.

Readings:

The following books are required – plus ther books (one a week) to be decided upon in consultation with the instructor:

Lytton Strachey, Eminent Victorians

Hermione Lee, Virginia Woolf

Norman Davies, The Isles

Requirements:

The main requirements of the course are met by students reading a book or its equivalent each week and by submitting a weekly critique of the reading. Each of the weekly essays is circulated to all other members of the class who make annotated comments on style as well as substance. Revision is required. The class thus becomes as much a course in professional writing as one in which individual academic interests are pursued.

Additionally, the class also meets together with the British Studies faculty seminar at three o'clock Friday afternoons. Attendance is mandatory.

About the Professor:

Professor Roger Louis teaches in Oxford as well as the UT Department of History. He is the author or editor of some twenty books including Imperialism at Bay and a biographical study of Churchill. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Oxford History of the British Empire.

This course has a writing flag.

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