Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
plan2 masthead
Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Hans Mark

Professor Ph.D, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Contact

Biography

John J. McKetta Centennial Energy Chair in Engineering

Research Area:
Orbital Mechanics

Email: hmark@mail.utexas.edu
Phone: (512) 471-5077, (512) 232-4427
Office: WRW 401B, MCC 4.714

Education:
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research Interests:

  • Tilt-rotor Aircraft Applications

  • Electromagnetic Railguns

  • Prevention of Nuclear Weapons Proliferation


Dr. Mark specializes in the study of spacecraft and aircraft design, electromagnetic rail guns, and national defense policy. He has served on the faculty of the Cockrell School of Engineering since 1988. He served as chancellor of The University of Texas System from 1984 to 1992. He previously taught at Boston University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Berkeley, and Stanford University.

Dr. Mark has served as director of the NASA-Ames Research Center, Secretary of the Air Force, deputy administrator of NASA and most recently, the Director of Defense Research and Engineering. He has published more than 180 technical reports and authored or edited eight books. Dr. Mark is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and an Honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He is the recipient of the 1999 Joe J. King Engineering Achievement Award and the 1999 George E. Haddaway Medal for Achievement in Aviation. He holds six honorary doctorates.

His Administrative Associate is Therese Larson, (512) 471-5077.

Interests

Tilt-rotor Aircraft Applications, Electromagnetic Railguns, Prevention of Nuclear Weapons Proliferation

T C 325 • Amer Tech/Victory Cold War

43390 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CRD 007A
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

Instructor: Hans Mark, John J. McKetta Centennial Energy Chair in Engineering, Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Cockrell School of Engineering

 

Description:

A good case can be made that one of the vital factors in bringing about the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, and the communist ideology on which it was based, was the consistent superiority of American technology for the forty-six year duration of the “Cold War”. It is the purpose of this course to examine this proposition. Many of these technologies had their origins during World War II when they were developed on a “crash” basis because of the exigencies of war. The institutions that developed these technologies were then converted to new work of a military nature that turned out to be important during the Cold War. Thus, the course will start with a discussion of the situation as World War II ended in the summer of 1945.

A number of examples of American technological developments will be presented, and the effect that they had on Soviet-American relations will be evaluated. One of the first was the Berlin Airlift, which broke the Soviet blockade of the city in 1949. We astonished the Soviets with our technological capability to supply a city of three million people with aircraft alone. It was the first “peaceful victory” in the Cold War. Next was the use of U-2 aircraft to gather credible information about the deployment of Soviet missiles in Cuba. The high-resolution U-2 pictures permitted President Kennedy to persuade a skeptical public that the Soviets were indeed doing just that. The development of the technology for defense against ballistic missiles was another important element. President Reagan’s refusal to trade away the work on missile defense at the Reikjavik summit meeting with President Gorbachev in 1986 was one of the critical turning points in U.S.-Soviet relations during the Cold War. The meeting persuaded Gorbachev that we were serious, and some believe he lost his nerve at that point. Gorbachev himself has actually said so. The continuing work on cryptology and other information systems were also a decisive element in winning the Cold War. This work was an extension of what was started in World War II and profoundly influenced computer development. Perhaps even more important, the unclassified work on information technology, transistor radios, Xerox machines, FAX machines and VCR technology made it impossible for the Soviets to operate the closed society that the communist philosophy demanded. The lectures will be presented roughly in chronological order of events during the Cold War. There will also be some discussions of how the legacy of the Cold War affects current events.

 

Text/Readings:

Course packet of articles about the Cold War

Supplemental readings for term paper (guided by the professor)

 

Requirements

The course consists of twenty-four lecture sessions supported by video presentations. There will be a mid-term and a required term paper. The students’ grades will be determined by their performance on these assignments.

 

T C 325 • Amer Tech/Victory Cold War

43440 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WRW 401E
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

A good case can be made that one of the vital factors in bringing about the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, and the communist ideology on which it was based, was the consistent superiority of American technology for the forty-six year duration of the “Cold War”. It is the purpose of this course to examine this proposition. Many of these technologies had their origins during World War II when they were developed on a “crash” basis because of the exigencies of war. The institutions that developed these technologies were then converted to new work of a military nature that turned out to be important during the Cold War. Thus, the course will start with a discussion of the situation as World War II ended in the summer of 1945.

A number of examples of American technological developments will be presented, and the effect that they had on Soviet-American relations will be evaluated. One of the first was the Berlin Airlift, which broke the Soviet blockade of the city in 1949. We astonished the Soviets with our technological capability to supply a city of three million people with aircraft alone. It was the first “peaceful victory” in the Cold War. Next was the use of U-2 aircraft to gather credible information about the deployment of Soviet missiles in Cuba. The high-resolution U-2 pictures permitted President Kennedy to persuade a skeptical public that the Soviets were indeed doing just that. The development of the technology for defense against ballistic missiles was another important element. President Reagan’s refusal to trade away the work on missile defense at the Reikjavik summit meeting with President Gorbachev in 1986 was one of the critical turning points in U.S.-Soviet relations during the Cold War. The meeting persuaded Gorbachev that we were serious, and some believe he lost his nerve at that point. Gorbachev himself has actually said so. The continuing work on cryptology and other information systems were also a decisive element in winning the Cold War. This work was an extension of what was started in World War II and profoundly influenced computer development. Perhaps even more important, the unclassified work on information technology, transistor radios, Xerox machines, FAX machines and VCR technology made it impossible for the Soviets to operate the closed society that the communist philosophy demanded. The lectures will be presented roughly in chronological order of events during the Cold War. There will also be some discussions of how the legacy of the Cold War affects current events.

Text/Readings:

Course packet of articles about the Cold War

Supplemental readings for term paper (guided by the professor)

Requirements:

The course consists of twenty-four lecture sessions supported by video presentations. There will be a mid-term and a required term paper. The students’ grades will be determined by their performance on these assignments.

About the Professor:

Dr. Hans Mark is a member of the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, specializing in the study of spacecraft and aircraft design, electromagnetic railguns, and national defense policy. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1954. Dr. Mark served as director of the NASA-Ames Research Center (1969-77) and Secretary of the Air Force (1979-81). While working for the U.S. Air Force, he created a space command center in Colorado which is still operational. During this time he was also the director of the National Reconnaissance Office, where he was responsible for managing the U.S. satellite reconnaissance program. In 1981, Mark was appointed deputy administrator of NASA. During his three years in the position, he supervised the first 14 space shuttle flights and beginnings of the United States involvement in the International Space Station program. He served as chancellor of The University of Texas System from 1984 to 1992 and on the faculty of the Cockrell School of Engineering since 1988. After working at the university for several years, Mark was named director of Defense Research and Engineering for the Department of Defense in 1998 and serviced until 2001.  He previously taught at Boston University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Berkeley, and Stanford University. Dr. Mark returned to teaching and researching at the University of Texas in 2001. He has published more than 180 technical reports and authored or edited eight books. Dr. Mark is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.  He has been awarded five Distinguished Service medals, two from the Department of Defense; two from NASA and one from the US Navy.  Dr. Mark holds six honorary doctorates.   

 

T C 325 • Amer Tech/Victory Cold War

42980 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WRW 401E
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

A good case can be made that one of the vital factors in bringing about the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, and the communist ideology on which it was based, was the consistent superiority of American technology for the forty-six year duration of the “Cold War”. It is the purpose of this course to examine this proposition. Many of these technologies had their origins during World War II when they were developed on a “crash” basis because of the exigencies of war. The institutions that developed these technologies were then converted to new work of a military nature that turned out to be important during the Cold War. Thus, the course will start with a discussion of the situation as World War II ended in the summer of 1945.

A number of examples of American technological developments will be presented, and the effect that they had on Soviet-American relations will be evaluated. One of the first was the Berlin Airlift, which broke the Soviet blockade of the city in 1949. We astonished the Soviets with our technological capability to supply a city of three million people with aircraft alone. It was the first “peaceful victory” in the Cold War. Next was the use of U-2 aircraft to gather credible information about the deployment of Soviet missiles in Cuba. The high-resolution U-2 pictures permitted President Kennedy to persuade a skeptical public that the Soviets were indeed doing just that. The development of the technology for defense against ballistic missiles was another important element. President Reagan’s refusal to trade away the work on missile defense at the Reikjavik summit meeting with President Gorbachev in 1986 was one of the critical turning points in U.S.-Soviet relations during the Cold War. The meeting persuaded Gorbachev that we were serious, and some believe he lost his nerve at that point. Gorbachev himself has actually said so. The continuing work on cryptology and other information systems were also a decisive element in winning the Cold War. This work was an extension of what was started in World War II and profoundly influenced computer development. Perhaps even more important, the unclassified work on information technology, transistor radios, Xerox machines, FAX machines and VCR technology made it impossible for the Soviets to operate the closed society that the communist philosophy demanded. The lectures will be presented roughly in chronological order of events during the Cold War. There will also be some discussions of how the legacy of the Cold War affects current events.

Text/Readings:

Course packet of articles about the Cold War

Supplemental readings for term paper (guided by the professor)

Requirements:

The course consists of twenty-four lecture sessions supported by video presentations. There will be a mid-term and a required term paper. The students’ grades will be determined by their performance on these assignments.

About the Professor:

Dr. Hans Mark is a member of the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, specializing in the study of spacecraft and aircraft design, electromagnetic railguns, and national defense policy. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1954. Dr. Mark served as director of the NASA-Ames Research Center (1969-77) and Secretary of the Air Force (1979-81). While working for the U.S. Air Force, he created a space command center in Colorado which is still operational. During this time he was also the director of the National Reconnaissance Office, where he was responsible for managing the U.S. satellite reconnaissance program. In 1981, Mark was appointed deputy administrator of NASA. During his three years in the position, he supervised the first 14 space shuttle flights and beginnings of the United States involvement in the International Space Station program. He served as chancellor of The University of Texas System from 1984 to 1992 and on the faculty of the Cockrell School of Engineering since 1988. After working at the university for several years, Mark was named director of Defense Research and Engineering for the Department of Defense in 1998 and serviced until 2001.  He previously taught at Boston University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Berkeley, and Stanford University. Dr. Mark returned to teaching and researching at the University of Texas in 2001. He has published more than 180 technical reports and authored or edited eight books. Dr. Mark is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.  He has been awarded five Distinguished Service medals, two from the Department of Defense; two from NASA and one from the US Navy.  Dr. Mark holds six honorary doctorates.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T C 325 • Tpcs In The Arts And Sciences

42870 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WRW 401E
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

Course Number: LAH 350

Title:  American Technology and Victory in the Cold War

Instructor: Hans Mark

Description:A good case can be made that one of the vital factors in bringing about the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, and the communist ideology on which it was based, was the consistent superiority of American technology for the forty-six year duration of the “Cold War”. It is the purpose of this course to examine this proposition. Many of these technologies had their origins during World War II when they were developed on a “crash” basis because of the exigencies of war. The institutions that developed these technologies were then converted to new work of a military nature that turned out to be important during the Cold War. Thus, the course will start with a discussion of the situation as World War II ended in the summer of 1945.    A number of examples of American technological developments will be presented, and the effect that they had on Soviet-American relations will be evaluated. One of the first was the Berlin Airlift, which broke the Soviet blockade of the city in 1949. We astonished the Soviets with our technological capability to supply a city of three million people with aircraft alone. It was the first “peaceful victory” in the Cold War. Next was the use of U-2 aircraft to gather credible information about the deployment of Soviet missiles in Cuba. The high-resolution U-2 pictures permitted President Kennedy to persuade a skeptical public that the Soviets were indeed doing just that. The development of the technology for defense against ballistic missiles was another important element. President Reagan’s refusal to trade away the work on missile defense at the Reikjavik summit meeting with President Gorbachev in 1986 was one of the critical turning points in U.S.-Soviet relations during the Cold War. The meeting persuaded Gorbachev that we were serious, and some believe he lost his nerve at that point. Gorbachev himself has actually said so. The continuing work on cryptology and other information systems were also a decisive element in winning the Cold War. This work was an extension of what was started in World War II and profoundly influenced computer development. Perhaps even more important, the unclassified work on information technology, transistor radios, Xerox machines, FAX machines and VCR technology made it impossible for the Soviets to operate the closed society that the communist philosophy demanded. The lectures will be presented roughly in chronological order of events during the Cold War. There will also be some discussions of how the legacy of the Cold War affects current events.

Text/Readings:Course packet of articles about the Cold War Supplemental readings for term paper (guided by the professor)

Requirements

The course consists of twenty-four lecture sessions supported by video presentations. There will be a mid-term and a required term paper. The students’ grades will be determined by their performance on these assignments.

About the Professor

Hans Mark is a Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at UT-Austin. He has been associated with The University's Institute for Advanced Technology as a Senior Research Engineer since 1990. In that capacity he works on advanced weapons systems for the U.S. Army. Dr. Mark was Chancellor of the UT System from 1984 to 1992. He was Deputy Administrator of NASA until 1984, appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1981. In 1977 he was appointed Undersecretary of the Air Force and Director of the National Reconnaissance Office by President Jimmy Carter. He is author or co-author of more than 180 scholarly articles and numerous books.

T C 325 • Tpcs In The Arts And Sciences

42805 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WRW 401E
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

Description:

A good case can be made that one of the vital factors in bringing about the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, and the communist ideology on which it was based, was the consistent superiority of American technology for the forty-six year duration of the “Cold War”. It is the purpose of this course to examine this proposition. Many of these technologies had their origins during World War II when they were developed on a “crash” basis because of the exigencies of war. The institutions that developed these technologies were then converted to new work of a military nature that turned out to be important during the Cold War. Thus, the course will start with a discussion of the situation as World War II ended in the summer of 1945.

A number of examples of American technological developments will be presented, and the effect that they had on Soviet-American relations will be evaluated. One of the first was the Berlin Airlift, which broke the Soviet blockade of the city in 1949. We astonished the Soviets with our technological capability to supply a city of three million people with aircraft alone. It was the first “peaceful victory” in the Cold War. Next was the use of U-2 aircraft to gather credible information about the deployment of Soviet missiles in Cuba. The high-resolution U-2 pictures permitted President Kennedy to persuade a skeptical public that the Soviets were indeed doing just that. The development of the technology for defense against ballistic missiles was another important element. President Reagan’s refusal to trade away the work on missile defense at the Reikjavik summit meeting with President Gorbachev in 1986 was one of the critical turning points in U.S.-Soviet relations during the Cold War. The meeting persuaded Gorbachev that we were serious, and some believe he lost his nerve at that point. Gorbachev himself has actually said so. The continuing work on cryptology and other information systems were also a decisive element in winning the Cold War. This work was an extension of what was started in World War II and profoundly influenced computer development. Perhaps even more important, the unclassified work on information technology, transistor radios, Xerox machines, FAX machines and VCR technology made it impossible for the Soviets to operate the closed society that the communist philosophy demanded. The lectures will be presented roughly in chronological order of events during the Cold War. There will also be some discussions of how the legacy of the Cold War affects current events.

 

Text/Readings:

Course packet of articles about the Cold War

Supplemental readings for term paper (guided by the professor)

 

Requirements:

The course consists of twenty-four lecture sessions supported by video presentations. There will be a mid-term and a required term paper. The students’ grades will be determined by their performance on these assignments.

 

About the Professor:

Hans Mark is a Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at UT-Austin. He has been associated with The University's Institute for Advanced Technology as a Senior Research Engineer since 1990. In that capacity he works on advanced weapons systems for the U.S. Army. Dr. Mark was Chancellor of the UT System from 1984 to 1992. He was Deputy Administrator of NASA until 1984, appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1981. In 1977 he was appointed Undersecretary of the Air Force and Director of the National Reconnaissance Office by President Jimmy Carter. He is author or co-author of more than 180 scholarly articles and numerous books.

T C 325 • Tpcs In The Arts And Sciences

43755 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WRW 401E
show description

American Technology and Victory in the Cold War



TC-325/LAH-350
Unique Numbers 43755/29680


Fall Semester 2009
Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:00-3:30PM
Room 401E   Woolrich Laboratories




Instructor:  Hans Mark
Room 401B  Woolrich Laboratories
512-471-5077
hmark@mail.utexas.edu
Office Hours:  T,TH 5:00-6:00PM




Administrative Assistant:  Therese Larson
Room 401C  Woolrich Laboratories
512-471-5077
tclarson@mail.utexas.edu
6:30AM to 3:30PM M-F





Important Dates:
Monday, August 31   Last day of the official add/drop period.
Friday, September 11  Twelfth class day.  Last day to drop a course for possible refund.  Last day to add a course.
Wednesday, September 23   Last day to drop a course without possible academic penalty.
Wednesday, October 21   Last day to withdraw or drop a course with approval from the dean.  Last day to change to/from pass/fail basis.



The Class Outline

The course consists of twenty-four lecture sessions supported by some video presentations.  Supporting handouts will be given at each session.

                    Homework Policy

There is no "homework" per se but it is expected that soon after the semester begins students will start on their term paper.

                    Attendance

It is expected that the students will attend all the lectures.  Important ideas or concepts can be missed if not in attendance.

                    Grading

There will be a term paper required in lieu of a final exam.  The due date of the final payment will be determined at a later date.  The TENTATIVE date is December 7th at 5pm.  The midterm will be an oral synopsis of the term paper topic.  The final grade in this course will depend upon the quality of the oral presentation of the student's topic and the actual term paper.  Absenteeism will be noted.  Standard grading (A,B,C..etc) will be used.  

                    Textbook

There is no textbook required.  A supplemental reading list will be given to the students that they can use to learn more about a particular topic that interests them.

                    Class Outcome

It is hoped that the students learn about the era of the Cold War from 1945 to 1991 and about the technological developments during that time.

                    Special Note

Student with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.







American Technology and the Victory in the Cold War
Course Description
Hans Mark
The University of Texas at Austin

    A good case can be made that one of the vital factors in bringing about the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the communist ideology on which it was based, was the consistent superiority of American technology for the forty-six year duration of the “Cold War”.  It is the purpose of this course to examine this proposition.  Many of these technologies had their origins during World War II when they were developed on a “crash” basis because of the exigencies of war.  The institutions that were built during the war to do these technology developments were converted to new work of a military nature that turned out to be important during the “Cold War”.  Thus, the course will start with a discussion of the situation as World War II ended in the summer of 1945.

    A number of examples of American technology developments will be presented and the effect that they had on Soviet-American relations will be evaluated.  One of the first was the Berlin Airlift which broke the Soviet blockade of the city in 1949.  We astonished the Soviets with our technological capability to supply a city of three million people with aircraft alone.  It was the first “peaceful victory” in the “Cold War”.  Next was the use of U-2 aircraft to gather credible information about the deployment of Soviet missiles in Cuba.  The high-resolution U-2 pictures permitted President Kennedy to persuade a skeptical public that the Soviets were indeed doing just that.  The development of the technology for defense against ballistic missiles was another important element.  President Reagan’s refusal to trade away the work on missile defense at the Reikjavik summit meeting with President Gorbachev in 1986 was one of the critical turning points in U.S. - Soviet relations during the “Cold War”.  The meeting persuaded Gorbachev that we were serious and some believe he lost his nerve at that point.  Gorbachev, himself, has actually said so.  The continuing work on cryptology and other information systems were also a decisive element in winning the “Cold War”.  This work was an extension of what was started in World War II and profoundly influenced computer development.  Perhaps even more important, the unclassified work on information technology, transistor radios, Xerox machines, FAX machines and VCR technology made it impossible for the Soviets to operate the closed society that the communist philosophy demanded.  The lectures will be presented roughly in the chronological order of events during the cold war as they occurred.  There will also be some discussions of how the legacy of the “Cold War” affects current events.

    I participated personally in many of the events that are described in these lecture notes. Therefore I cannot really pretend to take a “balanced” view of what happened during the past fifty years.  We will have to leave that to historians fifty years from now.  My hope is that I will be able to communicate some of the excitement of this period in our history, some of the risks we had to take and finally the satisfaction of living long enough to see us prevail over our adversaries.  In the dozen plus years since the collapse of the Soviet Empire, weapons developed during the “Cold War” have been used in a decisive way in various conflicts around the world.  This important legacy from the “Cold War” will also be discussed.

    The course consists of twenty-four lecture sessions supported by video presentations.  There will be a required term paper (the final) and a midterm review of the term paper topics.  The student’s grade will be determined by the performance of these assignments.  The course is intended for undergraduate students in the Colleges of Liberal Arts, Natural Sciences and first year graduate students in the LBJ School.  Qualified students in other university units might also be interested in the subject matter and would be welcome to attend. 
 
Table of Contents (Lecture Schedule)


Lecture #1.  The Origins of the “Cold War” and the Development of Nuclear Weapons.  The growth of science and technology in Europe.  The European ideological wars, World War I, World War II and the Cold War.  The development of nuclear weapons in the United States 1939 to 1945.

Lecture #2.  The Decision to Use Nuclear Weapons Against Japan in 1945.  Alternatives to use of the atomic bomb.  Demonstration at sea or over unpopulated region.  Debate within U.S. leadership as to what should be done.  Final decision to use the bomb by President Truman and the surrender of Japan.  Video:  “The Bomb” from “The World War” Vol. 24.

Lecture #3.  The “Cold War” Begins.  The failure of “four power” role in Berlin.  The Soviet blockade of Berlin and the airlift.  The first shot in the cold war.  The first Soviet retreat forced by the application of technology.  The creation of NATO as a result.  Video:  “The Berlin Airlift.”

Lecture #4.  The Soviet Atomic Bomb (“Joe One”), The U.S. Hydrogen Bomb and the Soviet Hydrogen Bomb.  The role of espionage in the development of Soviet nuclear weapons.  The development of thermonuclear weapons (Hydrogen bombs) by the U.S. and the USSR.  Conflict in the U.S. over the development of thermonuclear weapons and the case of J. Robert Oppenheimer

Lecture #5.  The Development of Large Rockets and Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs).  The delivery of nuclear weapons by ICBMs. The first Earth orbiting satellites.  Technology and political prestige – the Soviet Sputnik I.  The initiation of the space program and the creation of NASA as the American response.

Lecture #6.  Admiral Rickover and the Nuclear Propelled Submarines.  The development of nuclear reactors to drive submarines and the creation of the first true submersible ship.  Weapons for submarines and the “invulnerable” basing of nuclear weapons.  The leadership role of Hyman George Rickover.   Soviet response and technical problems with Soviet nuclear submarines.

Lecture #7.  Reconnaissance Aircraft and Spy Satellites.  The “Corona” satellite program.  The importance of satellite intelligence data for decision making during the “Cold War”.  The Lockheed SR-71 and U-2 reconnaissance aircraft and Clarence A. (Kelly) Johnson’s technology.

Lecture #8.  The Korean War.  The origin of the Korean War.  The first “hot” war during the “Cold War.”  The role of Stalin and Kim IL Sung.  Outcome of the Korean War and political consequences.  The role of General Douglas Macarthur and the intervention by the Chinese.  Video:  “World War II in the Pacific.  Vol. 6



Lecture #9.  The Cuban Missile Crisis (1962).  The most serious confrontation between the U.S. and the USSR during the “Cold War.”  The “Bay of Pigs” invasion of Cuba fails in April 1961.  The issue of Berlin is still important and Khrushchev seeks ways of pushing the western powers out of Berlin.  Decides to deploy nuclear armed missiles in Cuba.  U.S. responds by imposing a “quarantine” around the island.  U.S. warships stop Soviet cargo ships at sea.  Soviets eventually retreat because of U.S. naval superiority.

Lecture #10.  The Space Race I.  Early Soviet activities.  Yuri Gagarin’s first orbital flight. U.S. responses.  Similarities and differences between the U.S. and the Soviet Space Programs.  The formation of NASA.  The trip to the Moon, the Apollo program and the failure of the Soviet lunar program.  Video:  “Apollo 11” (NASA).

Lecture #11.  The Technology of Cryptology, and the Relationship to Communications Command, Control and Intelligence.  The importance of coding and decoding in the World War II and the “Cold War.”  The relationship to the development of high speed computers.  Bletchley Park and the breaking of the “Enigma” code.  The victories at the battles of Midway and in the Atlantic.  Command and control of military forces during the cold war and some results.  Important civilian applications.   Video:  “Still Secret” Vol. 3 “The Secret War.”

Lecture #12.  The Development of Radar and Advent of Electronic Warfare.  History of the German and British programs in World War II.  Application during the Battle of Britain in 1940 and 1941.  Radar and Naval superiority of the U.S.  Radar and electronic fire control during the “Cold War.”   Smart weapons and the use of the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) system for targeting.  Video:  “To See 100 Miles” Vol. 1 “The Secret War.”

Lecture #13.  The War in Vietnam I.  The longest “hot” war during the “Cold War.”  Origin of the war.  French colonialism.  Japanese occupation of Vietnam during World War II.  The battle for Dien Bien Phu in 1954 and the decisive defeat of the French by the Vietnamese.  The U.S. slowly takes over the French position in Vietnam.  Video:  PBS “The War in Vietnam” Vol. 1.

Lecture #14.  The War in Vietnam II.  President Kennedy’s support of the coup against Ngo Dinh Diem.  The decision to send 10,000 U.S. combat troops.  The fighting in Vietnam between U.S. troops and the North Vietnamese Army.  The commitment of 500,000 U.S. troops by President Johnson.  The decision to leave Vietnam by President Nixon in 1969.  Domestic political consequences.  The final withdrawal from Vietnam in 1974.  Video:  PBS “The War in Vietnam” Vol. 6.

Lecture #15.  Arms Control During the Cold War.  Control of Nuclear Weapons.  Atmospheric Test Ban 1963, SALT I 1972, Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty 1972, the failure of SALT II 1979, START Treaties, Treaties to “control” chemical and biological weapons.  The use of Earth orbiting satellites to monitor arms control treaties.  Effectiveness of arms control.  The doctrine of “Mutually Assured Destruction” (MAD) and “stability” during the cold war.

Lecture #16.  Combat Aircraft Development During the Cold War and the Strategic Triad.  The concept of “Global Reach, Global Power.”  The Boeing B-52 (1952), the Rockwell B-1B (1975) and the Northrop B-2 (1994).  “Stealth” technology.  Range-payload relations.  “Smart” weapons, laser designators and targeting using “Global Positioning Satellites” (GPS).

Lecture #17.  Transport Aircraft Development During the Cold War.  The use of U.S. transport aircraft to support military and humanitarian missions around the world.  The delivery of tanks to Israel in 1973 and food to Africa (Sahel, Somalia, Rwanda, etc.)  The Lockheed C-5A and the McDonnell-Douglas C-17.  Development of the MV-22 “Osprey” tiltrotor transport.

Lecture #18.  The Space Race II.  The development of the Space Shuttle and the Space Station.  President Carter’s support of the space shuttle, President Reagan’s space station, initiative.  The space station as an international enterprise in 1984 – the London Economic Summit.  The Soviet MIR space station.  Recent activities on the International Space Station.

Lecture #19.  The War Over the Falkland Islands (1982).  Relationship to “Cold War” policies.  Conflict between the Monroe Doctrine and the “special relationship” with Great Britain.  The first “modern” war with the use of high tech weapons by both Argentina and Great Britain.  Video:  “The Falklands War.”

Lecture #20.  The Development of Laser Weapons.  Gas Dynamic and Chemical Lasers provide the capability to produce high intensity continuous laser beams in the megawatt power regime.  The Airborne Laser laboratory (ALL) demonstrated the capability of shooting down air-to-air missiles at ranges up to 5 km in 1983.  The Tactical High Energy Laser (THEL) tested successfully in September 2000 at WMSR.  Video:  THEL Tests at the White Sands Missile Range.

Lecture #21.    Defense Against Ballistic Missiles.  Long history of work on ballistic missile defense starting in 1958, ABM Treaty in 1972.  President Reagan’s speech on “strategic defense” in March 1983.  Description of successful ABM intercept tests, 1998-2001.  Video:  ABM Test results for various systems.

Lecture #22.    The Middle East and the Cold War.  The Middle East was a major theatre of conflict during the Cold War.  Israel was created in 1948 as a result of persecution of Jews by the Nazis, which triggered a bitter continuing conflict between Israel and her Arab neighbors.  Israel became a client state of the U.S. and several Arab nations (Syria, Iraq and sometimes Egypt) became client states of the Soviet Union.  The end of the Cold War has intensified the conflict because one million Russian Jews immigrated to Israel.  All of this has put the U.S. in a much more difficult position in the region than during the Cold War.  The future is bleak and uncertain.

Lecture #23.    Energy and the Cold War.  There is a direct correlation between prosperity and the availability of cheap and convenient sources of energy.  Nations with the highest standard of living also consume the most energy.  For example, the United States – the largest nation with a high standard of living - has about five percent of the world’s population and accounts for about twenty five percent of the world’s energy consumption.  About sixty five percent of the world’s energy comes from oil and gas and therein lies the real problem.  Two thirds of the world’s oil resource and much of the gas is located in the Persian Gulf area.  Thus, the availability of this resource is affected by the political problems that are endemic to the region as explained in Lecture #22. These were important during the Cold War and to a large extent shaped our policies toward the Middle East. They are even more important now.  There are technical solutions to the heavy dependence of the industrial world on oil and gas from the Middle East but these would require time to implement and very substantial investments.  These include nuclear fission and various renewable concepts that are discussed here in the proper context.

Lecture #24.  The Collapse of the Soviet Union.  Mikhail Gorbachev becomes the Soviet leader in 1985.  Reikjavik summit meeting in October 1986 fails over the issue of missile defense.  Berlin Wall comes down in 1989 and Warsaw pact nations (Poland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary) leave Soviet orbit.  Coup by hard line communists against Gorbachev in August 1991 fails.  Gorbachev finally removed from office under pressure from Russian President Boris Yeltsin.  The red flag over the Kremlin is hauled down on December 25, 1991.  Victory in the "Cold War" is achieved.

bottom border