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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Nancy K. Stalker

Associate Professor Ph.D., 2002, Stanford University

Nancy K. Stalker

Contact

Biography

Research interests

Professor Stalker's scholarship examines the relationship between cultural and religious practice and national identity in modern Japan. Her first book, on new religious movements in the 1920s-30s, is entitled Prophet Motive: Deguchi Onisaburo, Oomoto and the Rise of New Religions in Imperial Japan. Her next monographic project will examine the role of ikebana, the art of flower arrangement, in constructing national and international Japanese identity in the twentieth century, especially focusing on its rapid expansion in postwar Japan from the 1950s-70s.  Other research interests include the conception of traditional Japanese cuisine and gender ideology. 

Courses taught

Introduction to Japan; Modern Japan; History of Japanese Religions; History of Religions of Asia; Religion and Rebellion in Modern East Asia;  War and Defeat in Japanese History and Memory; Imperial Japan; Readings in Modern East Asia;

Awards/Honors

Professor Stalker has won research fellowships from the Fullbright Association; the Japan Foundation, Yale University Council on East Asian Studies, Dartmouth College Humanities Institute, Stanford University Institute of International Studies (Stanford University), A.W. Mellon and Hosei University International scholars. 

Interests

20th-century cultural history, new religious movements, gender

T C 357 • Questionable Taste

43445 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CRD 007B
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Questionable Taste:  Food as History and Identity

Proposal For Plan II Junior Seminar

Submitted by:  Nancy Stalker, Dept of Asian Studies

 

Course Description: 

Why do we eat what we eat?  Where does our dinner come from?  How are our food choices shaped by politics, gender and national identity? This course provides an interdisciplinary exploration of food and eating that interrogates historical, cultural, economic, and geopolitical aspects of food, cooking and cuisine.  We will address both historical relationships between food, imperialism and colonialism and contemporary food-related globalization and identity issues.   We will read histories and ethnographies of different foods, analyze gender and class dimensions of food and examine food-centered autobiographies and travelogues.  

 

Sample Texts (in addition, many articles/chapters will be assigned): 

Daniel Bender & Jeffrey Pilcher, eds.,  Radical Foodways, (Duke University Press, 2011)

Caroline Korsmeyer, ed.  Taste Culture Reader: Experiencing Food and Drink (Berg, 2005)

Margaret Visser, Much Depends on Dinner, (Grove reprint, 2010)

Lizzie Collingham, Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors (Oxford, 2007)

Carol Off, Bitter Chocolate: The Dark Side of the World's Most Seductive Sweet (New Press, 2008)

M.F.K. Fisher, The Gastronomical Me (North Point Press, 1989)

Fuschia Dunlop, Shark’s Fin and Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet-Sour Memoir of Eating in China (W.W. Norton, 2008)

Theodore Bestor, Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World (University of California Press, 2004)

Raj Patel, Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World Food System (Melville House, 2008)

 

Requirements: 

• 30% Participation, Attendance and Presentation

Includes participation in weekly discussions and Blackboard forums, assigned presentations of class readings and an 8-10 minute presentation on their final project. 

• 30% Class Assignments -

--Eating Diary & Essay - For a designated period, students will keep a diary of the foods they eat and use this as material for a reflective and/or autobiographical essay of 3- 5 pages on food in their own lives

--Cookbook Analysis - Students will select one type of national cuisine, examine a variety of cookbooks on that type of cuisine and prepare a 3 - 5 page essay  analyzing what one can (and can’t) learn about the culture or nation through these works.

--Abstract & Preliminary Bibliography for Final Research Paper

Students will prepare a one-page abstract on plans for the research paper and a preliminary annotated bibliography of at least ten library sources.

• 40% Final Paper - Students will complete a research project and final paper of 12 - 15 pages related to food culture, politics or history.

T C 357 • Food As History And Identity

43765 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 2.124
show description

Course Description:

Why do we eat what we eat?  Where does our dinner come from?  How are our food choices shaped by politics, gender and national identity? This course provides an interdisciplinary exploration of food and eating that interrogates historical, cultural, economic, and geopolitical aspects of food, cooking and cuisine.  We will address both historical relationships between food, imperialism and colonialism and contemporary food-related globalization and identity issues.   We will read histories and ethnographies of different foods, analyze gender and class dimensions of food and examine food-centered autobiographies and travelogues.  

 

Sample Texts (in addition, many articles/chapters will be assigned): 

Sidney Mintz, Sweetness and Power:  The Place of Sugar in Modern History  (Penguin, 1986)

Jack Turner, Spice: The History of a Temptation (Vintage, 2005)

Priscilla Ferguson, Accounting for Taste: The Triumph of French Cuisine  (Chicago, 2004)

Rebecca L. Spang, The Invention of the Restaurant: Paris and Modern Gastronomic Culture         (Harvard, 2001)

Tom Standage, A History of the World in 6 Glasses (Walker, 2006)

Gabrielle Hamilton, Blood, Bones & Butter: The Inadvertent Education of a Reluctant Chef            (Random House, 2011)

Fuschia Dunlop, Shark’s Fin and Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet-Sour Memoir of Eating in China         (W.W. Norton, 2008)

Andrew Friedman, Knives at Dawn (Free Press, 2009)

Marion Nestle, Safe Food:  The Politics of Food Safety (California, 2010)

Theodore Bestor, Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World (California, 2004)

 

Requirements: 

• 30% Participation, Attendance and Presentation

Includes participation in weekly discussions and Blackboard forums, assigned presentations of class readings and an 8-10 minute presentation on their final project. 

• 30% Class Assignments -

--Eating Diary & Essay - For a designated period, students will keep a diary of the foods they eat and use this as material for a reflective and/or autobiographical essay of 3- 5 pages on food in their own lives

--Cookbook Analysis - Students will select one type of national cuisine, examine a variety of cookbooks on that type of cuisine and prepare a 3 - 5 page essay analyzing what one can (and can’t) learn about the culture or nation through these works.

--Abstract & Preliminary Bibliography for Final Research Paper

Students will prepare a one-page abstract on plans for the research paper and a preliminary annotated bibliography of at least ten library sources.

• 40% Final Paper - Students will complete a research project and final paper of 12 - 15 pages related to food culture, politics or history.

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