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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

David M. Oshinsky

Other faculty Ph.D., 1971, Brandeis University

T C 357 • History Of American Medicine

43120 • Spring 2013
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CRD 007A
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Description:

This seminar will explore the immense historical importance of infectious disease, in particular, using it as a lens to confront larger issues in the changing world of medical practice and investigation. We will study the impact of disease at critical points in American history, focusing upon the great epidemics that devastated our nation, as well as the scientific breakthroughs in epidemiology, vaccines and antibiotics that tamed the scourge of cholera, polio, typhoid fever, and influenza, among other deadly diseases. We will see, as well, how the battle against disease revolutionized philanthropy and medical research in the United States. And we will see the impact of disease upon different segments of the American population.

 

Texts/Readings:

Steven Johnson, THE GHOST MAP

James Jones, BAD BLOOD

Gina Kolata, FLU

Paul Offit, AUTISM’S FALSE PROPHETS

David Oshinsky, POLIO: AN AMERICAN STORY

Judith Walzer Leavitt, TYPHOID MARY

 

Assignments:

Students will be required to lead one class discussion, write one book review, and write a term paper, approximately thirty pages in length, based largely on primary sources.  

 

About the Professor:

Professor Oshinsky specializes in 20th Century U.S. political and cultural history. He is a Distinguished Teaching Professor and holds the Jack S. Blanton Chair in History.  Professor Oshinsky was the Pulitzer Prize winner in 2006 in the History category for his recently published book, Polio: An American Story.  In 2009, he was awarded the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Dean’s Medal for significant contributions to the field of public health. In 2010, he won the Cartwright Prize from Columbia University Medical Center for his research into the history of polio.

 

T C 357 • History Of American Medicine

42965 • Spring 2012
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CRD 007A
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Description:

The course will focus on the theory and practice of medicine in the United States from the 17th century to the present.  Topics include our changing biological environment, the history of public health campaigns, the development of medical research, the role of the physician, and the impact of disease on American history.

 

Texts/Readings:

Laurie Garrett, The Coming Plague

Judith Leavitt, Typhoid Mary

David Oshinsky, Polio: An American Story

Charles Rosenberg, The Cholera Years

Paul Starr, The Transformation of American Medicine.

 

Assignments:

Students will be required to lead one class discussion, write one book review, and write a term paper, approximately thirty pages in length, based largely on primary sources.  

 

About the Professor:

Professor Oshinsky specializes in 20th Century U.S. political and cultural history. He was the Pulitzer Prize winner in 2006 in the History category for his recently published book, Polio: An American Story.

T C 357 • History Of American Medicine

43455 • Spring 2011
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CRD 007A
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Description:

The course will focus on the theory and practice of medicine in the United States from the 17th century to the present.  Topics include our changing biological environment, the history of public health campaigns, the development of medical research, the role of the physician, and the impact of disease on American history.

 

Texts/Readings:

Laurie Garrett, The Coming Plague

Judith Leavitt, Typhoid Mary

David Oshinsky, Polio: An American Story

Charles Rosenberg, The Cholera Years

Paul Starr, The Transformation of American Medicine.

 

Assignments:

Students will be required to lead one class discussion, write one book review, and write a term paper, approximately thirty pages in length, based largely on primary sources.  

 

About the Professor:

Professor Oshinsky specializes in 20th Century U.S. political and cultural history. He was the Pulitzer Prize winner in 2006 in the History category for his recently published book, Polio: An American Story.

 

T C 357 • History Of American Medicine

43585 • Spring 2010
Meets M 1200-300pm CRD 007B
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PLAN II HONORS SEMINAR: HISTORY OF AMERICAN MEDICINE
                                                TC 357

                                   Spring 2010, DAVID OSHINSKY
                                   Email: oshinsky@mail.utexas.edu
                                   Office: Garrison Hall, 3.504
                                   Office Hours: Monday 11:00-1145. 3:00-4:00
                                                           Tuesday 8:30-915
      
This seminar will focus on the ways in which American medicine and medical research have advanced over the past few centuries, shaped by dramatic scientific breakthroughs and sweeping cultural changes.  At the center of our study is the immense historical importance of infectious disease, from the first contact between Europeans and Native Americans to modern-day crises inflicted by influenza, tuberculosis, and AIDS.  We will study the impact of disease at critical points in American history, such as westward expansion, the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, and various waves of immigration.  We will discuss the great epidemics that devastated our nation, as well as the scientific advances in vaccines and antibiotics that tamed the scourge of smallpox, polio, and pneumonia, among other deadly diseases.  We will see, as well, how the battle against disease revolutionized philanthropy and medical research in the United States.             

GRADING:  As an honors seminar, this course will have a heavier workload than normal.   Students will be expected to keep up with the reading and to participate actively in class discussion.  Each student will help to lead one class meeting.  There will be one book review (800 words) and a term paper, based on original research (10,000  words ).  The 800-word review, from a book on the course reading list, must be handed in before that book is discussed in class and cannot be the book associated with the weekly discussion that the student has chosen to lead.   The term paper must be on a medical subject of historical and/or contemporary importance.  All paper topics must be cleared with Professor Oshinsky

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Steven Johnson, THE GHOST MAP
James Jones, BAD BLOOD
Gina Kolata, FLU
Howard Markel, WHEN GERMS TRAVEL
Paul Offit, AUTISM’S FALSE PROPHETS
David Oshinsky, POLIO: AN AMERICAN STORY
Judith Walzer Leavitt, TYPHOID MARY

CLASS SCHEDULE:

January 25:  GOSPEL OF GERMS,
                     Markel, 5-176

February 1:  CHOLERA YEARS,
                     Johnson (entire).

February 8:    QUARANTINE,  CULTURE, AD PUBLIC HEALTH
                      Walzer (entire)

February 15:  THE GREAT INFLUENZA
                        Kolata (entire)   
 
February 22:  RACE AND MEDICAL EXPERIMENTATION in AMERICA
                       Jones (entire)

March 1:       THE GREAT POLIO CRUSADE
                      Oshinsky (entire)

March 8:       THE VACCINATION CONTROVERSY
                      Offit (entire)

March 15:      SPRING BREAK

March 22:     FIRST INDIVIDUAL MEETING WITH PROF. OSHINSKY

     
      From March 22 to the end of the term, students will meet individually with Professor Oshinsky each Monday to discuss their progress in writing the term paper.  Six new pages of the draft will be required every week; the student and Professor Oshinsky will go over these pages, line by line, until the draft is transformed into a polished finished product.  Students will email their weekly pages to Professor Oshinsky no later than 4:00 p.m. each Friday.    

     The Final Paper is due no later than THURSDAY. MAY 6 at 4:00 p.m.  Late papers will not be accepted.

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