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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Rosa N Schnyer

Assistant Professor

Clinical Assistant Professor of Health Outcomes & Pharmacy Practice

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Biography

Depression and anxiety are complex, multifactorial and chronic disorders, with a significant burden to the individual and society. Major depressive disorder (MDD), for example predicts future suicide attempts, interpersonal problems, unemployment, and substance abuse and it is a leading cause of disability worldwide. A significant proportion of individuals with depression do not receive adequate treatment and many people do not receive treatment at all. In the United States, only half of those who experienced MDD in the past year received treatment for it, and only 21% of the cases, received adequate treatment. Despite the widespread use of marketed antidepressants, between 19-34% of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) still do not respond to acute antidepressant treatment, 29-46% may fail to achieve and sustain a full remission, and between 15-50% will have a recurrence of depression despite continuous antidepressant treatment. Although non-pharmacological treatment options such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) have been found to be effective, only 50 - 66% of patients who receive CBT respond to acute treatment.

Dr. Schnyer's research focuses on the use of complementary therapies, especially acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine in the management of stress, depression and anxiety disorders, present alone or as part of complex, chronic conditions. Specifically, Dr. Schnyer is interested in evaluating the effect of acupuncture and Chinese herbs on sympathetic and parasympathetic function, inflammatory markers, stress hormones and clinical symptoms in patients with depression and anxiety. Dr. Schnyer is interested in developing novel treatments that can be delivered to large populations at low cost and that encourage and support patients to participate in their own care.

T C 302 • Mind/Body Relatnshp In Mod Med

43415 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CRD 007B
show description

The Mind-Body Relationship in Modern Medicine

Description:

This course will explore the mind body relationship in sickness and health from an interdisciplinary perspective. The aim is to provide a contemporary critical overview of the many influences that shape our beliefs about what the role of belief and expectation in healing and the implications of these beliefs in health care access, delivery and choices.

Various perspectives from the fields of philosophy, neurobiology, anthropology, psychology, medicine and economics will be presented in this course.

A key goal in health care is to foster the ability of health professionals to critically appraise the best scientific evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. Although evidence is not limited to what we know through randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, at the end of the day, the buck stops with the question of efficacy: is a treatment effective above and beyond the patient’s belief that it will work? But what do we know so far about the mind-body relationship?  Is the elusive placebo a clinicians’ friend or a foe?  What are the implications of the emerging field of mind-body medicine in our interpretation of clinical research data? How does culture influence our beliefs on why we fall ill, and how do our beliefs influence the course and duration of our illness? How will we decide which benefits to include in The Affordable Care Act?

 

Texts/Readings:

Harrington, Ann. The Cure Within: A History of Mind Body Medicine

Additional readings will be posted on Blackboard.

Assignments:

There are a variety of assignments for this course. These assignments were chosen to provide you with the opportunity to learn some new skills and practice old ones that will be helpful for you as you begin your college career.  Please seek guidance early and often as you work on these assignments.

There are three main categories of assignments for the semester (Quizzes / Exams, Oral Presentations, and Written Assignments). You are encouraged to personalize the assignments to areas that are of interest to you. It is much interesting to hear how the material applies to your life and your interests! Participation and keeping up with the weekly readings are essential components of the course.  Specific assignments are subject to change and will be announced on the first day of class; overall grade distribution will remain the same.

Readings – (response and participation on blackboard and in class discussion) – 20%

Writing – (weekly journal entries, two personal reflections 250-500 words, paper 500-750 words, final assignment search/bibliography/thesis statement/abstract) - 25%

Oral – (two mini oral presentations, Debate/Discussion Argument presentation) - 25%

Quizzes – (two based on on-line tutorials) - 5%

Final Exam – 25%

About the Professor:

Rosa N. Schnyer is a Doctor of Chinese Medicine (DAOM) and a Clinical Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing where she teaches and introductory course on Botanicals and Nutriceuticals and a course on Complementary and Alternative Medicine. She conducts research on acupuncture. Dr. Schnyer serves is former co-president of the Society for Acupuncture Research and maintains a private practice in Austin, TX.

 

T C 302 • Mind/Body Relatnshp In Mod Med

42950 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CRD 007B
show description

This course will explore the mind body relationship in sickness and health from an interdisciplinary perspective. The aim is to provide a contemporary critical overview of the many influences that shape our beliefs about what the role of belief and expectation in healing and the implications of these beliefs in health care access, delivery and choices.

Various perspectives from the fields of philosophy, neurobiology, anthropology, psychology, medicine and economics will be presented in this course.

A key goal in health care is to foster the ability of health professionals to critically appraise the best scientific evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. Although evidence is not limited to what we know through randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, at the end of the day, the buck stops with the question of efficacy: is a treatment effective above and beyond the patient’s belief that it will work? But what do we know so far about the mind-body relationship? Is the elusive placebo a clinicians’ friend or a foe? What are the implications of the emerging field of mind-body medicine in our interpretation of clinical research data? How does culture influence our beliefs on why we fall ill, and how do our beliefs influence the course and duration of our illness? How will we decide which benefits to include in The Affordable Care Act?

Texts/Readings:

Harrington, Ann. The Cure Within: A History of Mind Body Medicine

Additional readings will be posted on Blackboard.

Assignments:

There are a variety of assignments for this course. These assignments were chosen to provide you with the opportunity to learn some new skills and practice old ones that will be helpful for you as you begin your college career.  Please seek guidance early and often as you work on these assignments.

There are three main categories of assignments for the semester (Quizzes / Exams, Oral Presentations, and Written Assignments). You are encouraged to personalize the assignments to areas that are of interest to you. It is much interesting to hear how the material applies to your life and your interests! Participation and keeping up with the weekly readings are essential components of the course. Specific assignments are subject to change and will be announced on the first day of class; overall grade distribution will remain the same.

Readings – (response and participation on blackboard and in class discussion) – 20%

Writing – (weekly journal entries, two personal reflections 250-500 words, paper 500-750 words, final                assignment search/bibliography/thesis statement/abstract) - 25%

Oral – (two mini oral presentations, Debate/Discussion Argument presentation) - 25%

Quizzes – (two based on on-line tutorials) - 5%

Final Exam – 25%

About the Professor:

Rosa N. Schnyer is a Doctor of Chinese Medicine (DAOM) and a Clinical Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing where she teaches and introductory course on Botanicals and Nutriceuticals and a course on Complementary and Alternative Medicine. She conducts research on acupuncture. Dr. Schnyer serves is former co-president of the Society for Acupuncture Research and maintains a private practice in Austin, TX.

 

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