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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Susan Deans-Smith

Associate Professor Ph.D., Cambridge University

Susan Deans-Smith

Contact

Biography

Research interests

My research and teaching interests include the history of Colonial Latin America and the Spanish Empire, with particular emphasis on Mexico and the Andean region, society and culture in 17th and 18th century Mexico and the Andes, the visual arts and material culture in Latin America, and comparative colonial history. 

Courses taught

Colonial Latin America; Rethinking the Conquest of Mexico, Historiography of Colonial Spanish America, Resistance, Rebellion, and Revolution in Colonial Mexico and the Andes

Awards/Honors

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, 2000-2001
Social Science Research Council/American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship, 1995-96
National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, 1988-1989
Herbert Eugene Bolton Memorial Prize, Honorable Mention, 1993, for Bureaucrats, Planters, and Workers - the Making of the Tobacco Monopoly in Bourbon Mexico(Austin: University of Texas Press, 1992)

T C 357 • Aztecs And Incas: 1420-1821

43465 • Fall 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm CRD 007A
show description

This course explores the Spanish invasion of the indigenous empires of the Aztecs and the Incas and the consolidation of Spanish imperial power and colonial rule. We will examine the ways in which indigenous societies in the viceroyalties of Mexico and Peru were transformed and how their structures, in turn, also shaped the expansion and limitation of Spanish rule. What transformations in their societies occur and how do we explain recognizable continuities. How do the post-conquest indigenous societies of Peru and Mexico differ in their responses to Spanish conquest? How do we explain, for example, the eruption of the largest anti-colonial rebellion in Peru in 1781 under the leadership of Tupac Amaru, but nothing comparable in scope and scale in Mexico? What can we say about relationships and interactions that emerge among Spaniards, Indians, Africans, and their multi-racial offspring? In what ways did indigenous communities shape the trajectories of the independence movements in Mexico and Peru? Particular attention will be paid to the question of what primary sources (written and visual) are available to historians and how we use them to reconstruct the indigenous experiences under Spanish colonial rule and alternative histories of conquest. We will also consider briefly the long-term legacies of colonialism for contemporary indigenous societies in Mexico and the Andean region.

 

Texts/Readings:

* Kenneth Andren, Andean Worlds

* Ida Altman, The History of Greater Mexico

* Camille Townsend, Malintzin's Choices

* Matthew Restall, Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest

* David Carrasco and Scott Sessions, Daily Life of the Aztecs

* Michael Andrew Malpass, Daily Life in the Inca Empire

* Class Reader - The reader will include primary sources such as excerpts from indigenous codices, accounts of conquest from indigenous perspectives, indigenous maps, wills and testaments, inquisition records, paintings, etc., as well as articles that deal with military, religious, economic, cultural, and political aspects of conquest and colonialism. All of the readings are designed to expose students not only to the different methodologies and interdisciplinarity of research on this topic but also to the current debates and disagreements among historians.

 

Assignments:

*Short weekly critical reviews (2 pages) of assigned readings that will address a combination of secondary and primary sources (for a total of 16 pages; 40%)

* A longer essay (15 pages) that addresses comparison of a specific aspect of Mexican and Andean indigenous societies (additional research beyond assigned readings is required) (draft, 15%; final 30%)

* Participation in seminar debate and oral presentation of one critical review (15%)

 

Biography:

Susan Deans-Smith earned her Ph.D. in 1984 from Cambridge University. Her research interests include the history of the Spanish Empire, the history of Mexico and the Andes, comparative colonial studies, and the history of material and visual culture in Latin America. She is the recipient of fellowships from the ACLS/SSRC and the NEH. Her most recent publication is Race and Classification. The Case of Mexican America (Stanford, 2009), co-edited with Ilona Katzew.

T C 357 • Aztecs And Incas: 1420-1821

42955 • Spring 2012
Meets W 300pm-600pm CRD 007A
show description

Description:

This course explores the Spanish invasion of the indigenous empires of the Aztecs and the Incas and the consolidation of Spanish imperial power and colonial rule. We will examine the ways in which indigenous societies in the viceroyalties of Mexico and Peru were transformed and how their structures, in turn, also shaped the expansion and limitation of Spanish rule. What transformations in their societies occur and how do we explain recognizable continuities. How do the post-conquest indigenous societies of Peru and Mexico differ in their responses to Spanish conquest? How do we explain, for example, the eruption of the largest anti-colonial rebellion in Peru in 1781 under the leadership of Tupac Amaru, but nothing comparable in scope and scale in Mexico? What can we say about relationships and interactions that emerge among Spaniards, Indians, Africans, and their multi-racial offspring? In what ways did indigenous communities shape the trajectories of the independence movements in Mexico and Peru? Particular attention will be paid to the question of what primary sources (written and visual) are available to historians and how we use them to reconstruct the indigenous experiences under Spanish colonial rule and alternative histories of conquest. We will also consider briefly the long-term legacies of colonialism for contemporary indigenous societies in Mexico and the Andean region.

 

Texts/Readings:

* Kenneth Andren, Andean Worlds

* Ida Altman, The History of Greater Mexico

* Camille Townsend, Malintzin's Choices

* Matthew Restall, Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest

* David Carrasco and Scott Sessions, Daily Life of the Aztecs

* Michael Andrew Malpass, Daily Life in the Inca Empire

* Class Reader - The reader will include primary sources such as excerpts from indigenous codices, accounts of conquest from indigenous perspectives, indigenous maps, wills and testaments, inquisition records, paintings, etc., as well as articles that deal with military, religious, economic, cultural, and political aspects of conquest and colonialism. All of the readings are designed to expose students not only to the different methodologies and interdisciplinarity of research on this topic but also to the current debates and disagreements among historians.

 

Assignments:

* Short weekly critical reviews (2 pages) of assigned readings that will address a combination of secondary and primary sources (for a total of 16 pages; 40%)

* A longer essay (15 pages) that addresses comparison of a specific aspect of Mexican and Andean indigenous societies (additional research beyond assigned readings is required) (draft, 15%; final 30%)

* Participation in seminar debate and oral presentation of one critical review (15%)

 

Biography:

Susan Deans-Smith earned her Ph.D. in 1984 from Cambridge University. Her research interests include the history of the Spanish Empire, the history of Mexico and the Andes, comparative colonial studies, and the history of material and visual culture in Latin America. She is the recipient of fellowships from the ACLS/SSRC and the NEH. Her most recent publication is Race and Classification. The Case of Mexican America (Stanford, 2009), co-edited with Ilona Katzew.

 

 

 

 

Publications

Book

Bureaucrats, Planters, and Workers - the Making of the Tobacco Monopoly in Bourbon Mexico (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1992).

Ilona Katzew and Susan Deans-Smith eds., Race and Classification. The Case of Mexican America (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009)

Susan Deans-Smith and Eric Van Young eds., Mexican Soundings: Essays In Honour of David A. Brading (London: Institute for the Study of the Americas, 2007)

Articles

    "'A Natural and Voluntary Dependence': The Royal Academy of San Carlos and the Cultural Politics of Art Education in Mexico City, 1786-1797." Bulletin of Latin American Research,  (2010)

    oSusan Deans-Smith and Ilona Katzew, "Introduction. The Alchemy of Race in Mexican America," in Ilona Katzew and Susan Deans-Smith eds., Race and Classification. The Case of Mexican America (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009): 1-24

"Dishonor in the Hands of Indians, Spaniards, and Blacks": Painters and the (Racial) Politics of Painting in Early Modern Mexico" in Ilona Katzew and Susan Deans-Smith eds., Race and Classification. The Case of Mexican America (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009): 43-72

"This Noble and Illustrious Art": Painters and the Politics of Guild Reform in Early Modern Mexico City." In Mexican Soundings: Essays In Honor of David A. Brading, eds., Susan Deans-Smith and Eric Van Young (London: Brookings Institute Press, 2007): 67-98

"Creating the Colonial Subject: Casta Paintings, Curiosities and Collectors in Eighteenth Century Mexico and Spain." Colonial Latin American Review, vol. 14 2 (December) 2005: 169-204

"Native Peoples of the Gulf Coast from the Colonial Period to the Present," in The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas (MesoAmerica) Vol. II, Part 2 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000): 274-302

"The Arena of Dispute," in Mexico's New Cultural History ¿Una Lucha Libre? eds. Susan Deans-Smith and Gil Joseph (Duke University Press, 1999): 203-208 (Special Issue of the Hispanic American Historical Review, 79, No. 2)

 "Gender, Morality and Work Discipline - the Working Poor, Public Order, and the Colonial State in Eighteenth Century Mexico," in Rituals of Rule, Rituals of Resistance: Public Celebrations and Popular Culture in Mexico, eds. William H. Beezely, Cheryl E. Martin, and William E. French (Scholarly Resources, Inc., 1994): 47-77

"Culture, Power, and Society in Colonial Mexico," Latin American Research Review 33, No. 1 (1998): 257-277

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