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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Steven Weinberg

Professor

Biography

Steven Weinberg holds the Josey Regental Chair in Science at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is a member of the Physics and Astronomy Departments. His research on elementary particles and cosmology has been honored with numerous prizes and awards, including in 1979 the Nobel Prize in Physics and in 1991 the National Medal of Science. In 2004 he received the Benjamin Franklin Medal of the American Philosophical Society, with a citation that said he is "considered by many to be the preeminent theoretical physicist alive in the world today." He has been elected to the US National Academy of Sciences and Britain's Royal Society, as well as to the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the author of over 300 articles on elementary particle physics. His books include Gravitation and Cosmology -- Principles and Applications of the General Theory of Relativity (1972); The First Three Minutes (1977); The Discovery of Subatomic Particles (1983, 2003); Elementary Particles and The Laws of Physics (with R.P. Feynman) (1987); Dreams of a Final Theory -- The Search for the Fundamental Laws of Nature (1993); a trilogy, The Quantum Theory of Fields (1995, 1996, 2000); Facing Up --- Science and its Cultural Adversaries (2002); Glory and Terror -- The Growing Nuclear Danger (2004); Cosmology (2008); and most recently Lake Views (2010). Articles of his on various subjects appear from time to time in The New York Review of Books and other periodicals. He has served as consultant at the U. S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, President of the Philosophical Society of Texas, and member of the Board of Editors of Daedalus magazine, the Council of Scholars of the Library of Congress, the JASON group of defense consultants, and many other boards and committees. Educated at Cornell, Copenhagen, and Princeton, he also holds honorary doctoral degrees from sixteen other universities, including Chicago, Columbia, McGill, Padua, Salamanca, and Yale. He taught at Columbia, Berkeley, M.I.T., and Harvard, where he was Higgins Professor of Physics, before coming to Texas in 1982.

Interests

Particle physics; unification of fundamental interactions; cosmology

T C 310 • Modes Of Reasoning

43070 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am RLM 7.104
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Modes of Reasoning: The Discovery of Science

Description:

The aim of the course is to describe how we learned how to learn about nature --- that is, how science became what it is now.  The topics to be covered are:

1  Greek astronomy

2  Greek physics

3  Arab science

4  Medieval science

5  The scientific revolution

6  Physics after Newton

7  Chemistry and Biology after Newton

8  Reductionism in the 20th Century

9  Is science still changing?

No scientific background is required.  Scientific discoveries will be explained using elementary algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, but not calculus.

Texts/Readings:

Kuhn "Copernican Revolution" Ed: 1 Yr: 1957 Pub: TRILIT

Matthews "Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy" ED: 1 Yr: 1989 Pub: HACK

Heath "Greek Astronomy" 1991 Pub: DOVER

Assignments:

Midterm Exam:           35%

Final Exam:    65%

About the Professor:

Steven Weinberg holds the Josey Regental Chair in Science at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is a member of the Physics and Astronomy Departments. His research on elementary particles and cosmology has been honored with numerous prizes and awards, including in 1979 the Nobel Prize in Physics and in 1991 the National Medal of Science. In 2004 he received the Benjamin Franklin Medal of the American Philosophical Society, with a citation that said he is "considered by many to be the preeminent theoretical physicist alive in the world today." He has been elected to the US National Academy of Sciences and Britain's Royal Society, as well as to the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Articles of his on various subjects appear from time to time in The New York Review of Books. He has served as consultant at the U. S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, President of the Philosophical Society of Texas, and member of the Board of Editors of Daedalus magazine, the Council of Scholars of the Library of Congress, the JASON group of defense consultants, and many other boards and committees. Educated at Cornell, Copenhagen, and Princeton, he also holds honorary doctoral degrees from sixteen other universities, including Chicago, Columbia, McGill, Padua, Salamanca, and Yale. He taught at Columbia, Berkeley, M.I.T., and Harvard, where he was Higgins Professor of Physics, before coming to Texas in 1982.

 

 

T C 310 • Modes Of Reasoning

42850 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am RLM 7.104
show description

Description:The aim of the course is to describe how we learned how to learn about nature --- that is, how science became what it is now.  The topics to be covered are:

1  Greek astronomy

2  Greek physics

3  Arab science

4  Medieval science

5  The scientific revolution

6  Physics after Newton

7  Chemistry and Biology after Newton

8  Reductionism in the 20th Century

9  Is science still changing?

No scientific background is required.  Scientific discoveries will be explained using elementary algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, but not calculus.

Texts/Readings:Kuhn "Copernican Revolution" Ed: 1 Yr: 1957 Pub: TRILITMatthews "Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy" ED: 1 Yr: 1989 Pub: HACKCourse Packet

Assignments:

Midterm Exam    35%

Final Exam        65%

About the Professor:

Steven Weinberg holds the Josey Regental Chair in Science at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is a member of the Physics and Astronomy Departments. His research on elementary particles and cosmology has been honored with numerous prizes and awards, including in 1979 the Nobel Prize in Physics and in 1991 the National Medal of Science. In 2004 he received the Benjamin Franklin Medal of the American Philosophical Society, with a citation that said he is "considered by many to be the preeminent theoretical physicist alive in the world today." He has been elected to the US National Academy of Sciences and Britain's Royal Society, as well as to the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Articles of his on various subjects appear from time to time in The New York Review of Books. He has served as consultant at the U. S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, President of the Philosophical Society of Texas, and member of the Board of Editors of Daedalus magazine, the Council of Scholars of the Library of Congress, the JASON group of defense consultants, and many other boards and committees. Educated at Cornell, Copenhagen, and Princeton, he also holds honorary doctoral degrees from sixteen other universities, including Chicago, Columbia, McGill, Padua, Salamanca, and Yale. He taught at Columbia, Berkeley, M.I.T., and Harvard, where he was Higgins Professor of Physics, before coming to Texas in 1982.

T C 310 • Modes Of Reasoning

43750 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 RLM 7.104
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TC 310 –- Modes of Reasoning: The Invention of Science
TTH 9:30-11:00 RLM 7.104 #43750
Steven Weinberg

Tentative Course Outline:
I.    Greek Physics
II.    Greek Astronomy
III.    The Arabs
IV.    The Middle Ages
V.    The Scientific Revolution
VI.    After Newton

The subject matter of the course will center on the gradual and difficult development of the modern idea of science.

There are no formal course prerequisites, but students should expect to be using elementary algebra to understand scientific discoveries.

My office hours are Tuesdays, 11am to noon, and otherwise by appointment.  My office is RLM 9.306A, telephone 471-4394, e-mail weinberg@physics.utexas.edu.  I greatly prefer questions about the course material to be asked in class, rather than after class.

The teaching assistant for this course is Joel Meyers, joelmeyers@mail.utexas.edu.  He will be in RLM 9.312 on Tuesdays 11:00am to 1:00pm; Thursday 11:00am to noon, and by appointment.  Notices regarding the course will be posted on the course web page, accessible at http://courses.utexas.edu.


Required books:
Course packet: Excerpts from Greek Astronomy, by T. L. Heath
Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy, by M. R. Matthews
The Copernican Revolution, by T. Kuhn

Other readings, and a list of books on reserve, will be distributed in class.

Grades will be based chiefly on a final exam on Friday December 11, 9:00am - 12 noon, and on an in-class midterm exam, date to be determined.  Attendance will not be taken in class, but active class participation may improve some grades.  Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the course.

I have been asked to add the following statement: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

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